Women on Liberty

About this Collection

Many women authors have contributed to our understanding of the nature of individual liberty and limited government through their writings about history, economics, and political philosophy.

Key People

Titles & Essays

A – Z List

Communities. Classes. Races

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History Of Scholarship And Learning. The Humanities

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Language And Literature

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Russia. Soviet Union. Former Soviet Republics.

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United States

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Not Categorized

LIBERTY MATTERS

Feminist Economics: The Conversation

Giandomenica Becchio (contributor)

The Conversation

Giandomenica Becchio,Response

Mikayla Novak, Response

Arnold Kling, Response

Jayme Lemke,Are there better ways to understand gender norms?

Giandomenica Becchio, Final Response:Do we need feminist...

LIBERTY MATTERS

We do need feminist economics, one that engages with Austrian economics

Mikayla Novak (contributor)

Read Giandomenica Becchio's Lead Essay.

LIBERTY MATTERS

Yes, the Feminist Perspective is Still Undervalued in Economics

Jayme Lemke (contributor)

Read Giandomenica Becchio's Lead Essay.

Read Mikayla Novak's response.

Read Arnold Kling's response.

LIBERTY MATTERS

Yes, the Feminist Perspective is Still Undervalued in Economics

By: Jayme Lemke

Read Giandomenica Becchio's Lead Essay.

Read Mikayla Novak's response.

Read Arnold Kling's response.

Quotes

Women’s Rights

Harriet Taylor wants to see “freedom and admissibility” in all areas of human activity replace the system of “privilege and exclusion” (1847)

Harriet Taylor

Presidents, Kings, Tyrants, & Despots

Madame de Staël argues that Napoleon was able to create a tyrannical government by pandering to men’s interests, corrupting public opinion, and waging constant war (1817)

Germaine de Staël

Liberty

Madame de Staël on how liberty is ancient and despotism is modern (1818)

Germaine de Staël

Presidents, Kings, Tyrants, & Despots

Madame de Staël on the tyrant Napoleon (1818)

Germaine de Staël

Women’s Rights

Mary Wollstonecraft believes that women are no more naturally subservient than men and nobody, male or female, values freedom unless they have had to struggle to attain it (1792)

Mary Wollstonecraft

Women’s Rights

Mary Wollstonecraft likens the situation of soldiers under a tyrant king to women under a tyrant husband (1792)

Mary Wollstonecraft

Women’s Rights

Mary Wollstonecraft’s “I have a dream” speech from 1792

Mary Wollstonecraft

Politics & Liberty

Mercy Otis Warren asks why people are so willing to obey the government and answers that it is supineness, fear of resisting, and the long habit of obedience (1805)

Mercy Otis Warren

Revolution

Mercy Otis Warren on Civil and Religious Rights and Tyranny

Mercy Otis Warren

Women’s Rights

The Women of Seneca Falls and William Blackstone

Sir William Blackstone