Rights of Women

About this Collection

During the French Revolution a number of men and women began to argue in favor of granting women full civic and legal rights. In France this was taken up by Condorcet and Olympes de Gouge; in Britain by Mary Wollstonecraft. During the nineteenth century, whilst a Member of Parliament, John Stuart Mill, argued for the same thing.

Key People

Titles & Essays

A – Z List

English Literature

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France Andorra Monaco

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History Of Scholarship And Learning. The Humanities

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Language And Literature

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Philosophy, Psychology, And Religion

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Political Theory

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Russia. Soviet Union. Former Soviet Republics.

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Social History And Conditions. Social Problems. Social Reform

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The Family. Marriage. Women

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United States

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Not Categorized

BOLL 33: Mary Wollstonecraft, “A Vindication of the Rights of Woman” (1792)

Mary Wollstonecraft (author)

This is part of “The Best of the Online Library of Liberty” which is a collection of some of the most important material in the OLL. A thematic list…

BOLL 50: Condorcet and Olympe de Gouges, “The Rights of Women” (1790-91)

Marie-Jean-Antoine-Nicolas Caritat, Marquis de Condorcet (author)

This is part of “The Best of the Online Library of Liberty” which is a collection of some of the most important material in the OLL. A thematic list…

Quotes

Women’s Rights

Frederick Douglass on Women’s Right to Vote

Frederick Douglass

Women’s Rights

Harriet Taylor wants to see “freedom and admissibility” in all areas of human activity replace the system of “privilege and exclusion” (1847)

Harriet Taylor

Women’s Rights

J.S. Mill denounced the legal subjection of women as “wrong in itself” and as “one of the chief hindrances to human improvement” (1869)

John Stuart Mill

Women’s Rights

J.S. Mill in “The Subjection of Women” argued that every form of oppression seems perfectly natural to those who live under it (1869)

John Stuart Mill

Women’s Rights

J.S. Mill on the wife as the “actual bondservant of her husband” in the 19th century (1869)

John Stuart Mill

Women’s Rights

J.S. Mill spoke in Parliament in favour of granting women the right to vote, to have “a voice in determining who shall be their rulers” (1866)

John Stuart Mill

Property Rights

J.S. Mill’s great principle was that “over himself, over his own body and mind, the individual is sovereign” (1859)

John Stuart Mill

Women’s Rights

James Mill on Women and Representative Government

James Mill

Women’s Rights

John Stuart Mill uses an analogy with the removal of protective duties and bounties in trade to urge a similar “Free Trade” between the sexes (1869)

John Stuart Mill

Women’s Rights

Mary Wollstonecraft believes that women are no more naturally subservient than men and nobody, male or female, values freedom unless they have had to struggle to attain it (1792)

Mary Wollstonecraft

Women’s Rights

Mary Wollstonecraft likens the situation of soldiers under a tyrant king to women under a tyrant husband (1792)

Mary Wollstonecraft

Women’s Rights

Mary Wollstonecraft on Women’s Education

Mary Wollstonecraft

Women’s Rights

Mary Wollstonecraft’s “I have a dream” speech from 1792

Mary Wollstonecraft

Women’s Rights

The Women of Seneca Falls and William Blackstone

Sir William Blackstone