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Sumner: A Bibliography

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Source: In Sumner's The Forgotten Man and Other Essays, ed. Albert Galloway Keller (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1918).

BIBLIOGRAPHY

bibliographical note

The following bibliography is as nearly exhaustive as we have been able to make it. There are doubtless other articles which have not come under our notice; and there are certainly a number of contributions to the press, signed and unsigned, to which we have no clue. The distribution of those which we have found will indicate the task of any one who should aim at exhaustiveness.

It has seemed best to us to include the titles of certain unpublished writings, especially where these are to be made accessible to students by the deposit of the manuscripts with the Yale University Library (under Sumner Estate). Summer had a way of writing something out very carefully, perhaps as a lecture, and then laying it away with apparently no thought of publishing it; a number of such manuscripts have been printed for the first time in this series of volumes. There are also a few of Sumner's printed utterances which we possessed in the form of clippings, but could not locate; the titles of such have been included as accessible at the Yale Library.

There is a good deal of Sumner's writing in the reports of the Connecticut State Board of Education. We have been informed that his services to that Board, extending over twenty years, included much committee work and many carefully written reports. As these are of a somewhat special nature, we refer simply to the documents of the Board.

It is the intention of the publishers to make of the volumes now in print under uniform style a set of four, to be numbered in the order of their appearance. For the sake of brevity, then, War and Other Essays is referred to below as Vol. I; Earth Hunger and Other Essays, as Vol. II; The Challenge of Facts and Other Essays, as Vol. III; and The Forgotten Man and Other Essays, as Vol. IV.

There are in these volumes a few numbers not written by Sumner, but about him, such as the Memorial Addresses in Vol. III.

A. G. K.

M. R. D.

  • 1872. The Books of the Kings, by K. C. W. F. Bahr. Translated, Enlarged, and Edited . . . Book 2, by W. G. Sumner, in Lange, J. P., A commentary on the Holy Scripture . . . New York, Scribner, Armstrong & Co., 1866–1882, 26 vols., VI, 312 pp.
  • The Church's Law of The Interpretation of Scripture. Unpublished manuscript on scientific criticism of the Bible. April 3. 61 pp. (Sumner Estate.)
  • Memorial Day Address. Delivered at Morristown, May 30. Printed for the first time in Vol. III, pp. 347362.

  • 1873. The Solidarity of the Human Race. Unpublished manuscript of an address on the influence of ideas and events in one country on conditions in other countries, delivered at the Sheffield Scientific School, January 11. 40 pp. (Sumner Estate.)
  • Relation of Physical to Moral Good. An address. Unpublished manuscript probably of this date, 35 pp. (Sumner Estate.)
  • Introductory Lecture to Courses in Political and Social Science. Printed for the first time in Vol. III, pp. 391–403.
  • History of Paper Money. Paper money in China, England, Austria, Russia, and the American Colonies. Unpublished manuscript, 109 pp. (Sumner Estate.)
  • Socialism. Three unpublished manuscripts written between 1873 and 1880 which appear to be preliminary sketches to the essay entitled The Challenge of Facts. 38, 12, and 31 pp. respectively.

  • 1874. A History of American Currency, with chapters on the English Bank Restriction and Austrian Paper Money, to which is appended “The Bullion Report.” New York, H. Holt & Co., iv, 391 pp., twofold diagram.
  • The Lesson of the Panic (of 1873). Unpublished manuscript advocating a return to a sound currency, 20 pp. (Sumner Estate.)
  • Have we had Enough? Unpublished manuscript on the evils of paper money, written soon after the panic of 1873, 15 pp. (Sumner Estate.)
  • Political Economy. From 300 to 400 pp. of lecture notes for classroom use. (Sumner Estate.)

  • 1874. Taxation. What it is, what its relation to other departments of political economy is, and what are the general principles by which it must be controlled. Unpublished manuscript probably of this date, 24 pp. (Sumner Estate.)

  • 1875. American Finance. Boston, Williams.
  • The Currency Question. An address delivered about this time opposing the issue of irredeemable paper money. Unpublished manuscript, 96 pp. (Sumner Estate.)

  • 1876. Monetary Development. (In Woolsey, T. D., and others, First Century of the Republic. New York, Harper & Bros.)
  • Politics in America, 1776–1876. North American Review, January, Vol. CXXII, Centennial number, pp. 47–87. Reprinted in Vol. IV, pp. 285–333.
  • Shall the “Hard Times” Continue? A review of the address of Professor Sumner before the New Haven Chamber of Commerce. The Woonsocket Patriot, May 19.
  • Bourbonism. “Real Issues of the Day.” New York World, May 19.
  • Free Pig-iron. Letter to the New York Mercantile Journal, June 3.
  • For President? New Haven Palladium, September 12. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 365–379.
  • Is The War Over? “Real Issues of the Day.” New York World, October 9.
  • Fears of a Solid South. “Real Issues of the Day.” New York World, October 10.
  • Political Status of the Southern States. Letter to the New York World, October 16.
  • What Has Become of Reform? “Real Issues of the Day.” New York World, October 23.
  • The Democratic Reply. To the visiting Republicans in New Orleans who refused to enter into a conference upon the subject of the counting of the election returns. New York Tribune, November 17.
  • “Professor Sumner on Louisiana.” Letter to the New York World, November 21, in answer to Governor Ingersoll's request to express his views on the political situation in that state after his visit to New Orleans.

  • 1876. Impressions in New Orleans. Letter to the New York Herald, November 22.

  • 1877. Lectures on the History of Protection in the United States. Delivered before the International Free-trade Alliance. Reprinted from “The New Century.” Published for the International Free-trade Alliance by G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, 64 pp. Contents: The National Idea and the American System, Broad Principles Underlying the Tariff Controversy, The Origin of Protection in this Country, The Establishment of Protection in this Country, Vacillation of the Protective Policy in this Country.
  • Republican Government. The Chicago Tribune, January 1. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 223–240.
  • Protection and Pig-iron. Letter to the Courier, February 12.
  • Democracy and Responsible Government. Address at Providence, R. I., June 20, before the Phi Beta Kappa Society of Brown University. The Providence Evening Press, June 21. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 243–286.
  • Silver. Address before the Senior Class of Yale University. The New Haven Union, December 12.
  • The Silver Question. What it is and how it should be dealt with. New York World, December 12.
  • The Commercial Crisis of 1837. Written in 1877 or 1878. (There are indications on the manuscript that it was once printed, but efforts to find where have failed.) Published, probably for the first time, in Vol. IV, pp. 371–398.

  • 1878. Our Revenue System, by A. L. Earle. Preface by W. G. Sumner. New York, published for the New York Free-trade Club by G. P. Putnam's Sons, 47 pp. (Economic Monograph No. V.)
  • Money and its Laws. International Review, January and February, Vol. V, pp. 75–81.
  • What is Free Trade? Chicago News, January 7.
  • Silver. Address in Chicago. The Chicago Tribune, January 9.
  • The Silver Question. Lecture before the Manhattan Club of New York City, January 25, on the disastrous

  • 1878 results of remonetization. The New York World, January 26.
  • A Few Plain Answers. Letter to the New Haven Register, February 28, on the tariff.
  • Protection and Revenue in 1877. Lecture delivered before the New York Free-trade Club, April 18. New York, published for the New York Free-trade Club by G. P. Putnam's Sons. (Economic Monograph No. VIII.)
  • Socialism. Seribner's Monthly, October, Vol. XVI, No. 6, pp. 887–893.
  • Relation of Legislation to Currency. Unpublished manuscript written about this time dealing with the nature of money, coining, paper money, legal tender acts, the monetary experience of England and France, etc., and opposing the abuses of legislation in regard to currency. 45 pp. (Sumner Estate.)
  • A Concurrent Circulation of Gold and Silver. Printed for the first time in Vol. IV, pp. 183–210.

  • 1879. Bimetallism. Princeton Review, November, pp. 546–578.
  • Amortization of Public Debts. Unpublished manu script, chiefly historical, written about this time. 35 pp. (Sumner Estate.)
  • The Influence of Commercial Crises on Opinions about Economic Doctrines. An address probably of this date. Printed for the first time in Vol. IV, pp. 213–235.
  • The Co-operative Commonwealth. Written in the seventies or eighties. Extracts printed for the first time in Vol. IV, pp. 441–462.

  • 1880. What Our Boys are Reading. Combined with “Books and Reading for the Young,” by J. H. Smart. Chas. Scribner's Sons. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 367–377.
  • The True Aim of Life. Address to the Seniors in Yale University. The New Haven Register, February 1. (Not in form for reprinting.)
  • The Theory and Practice of Elections. Princeton Review, March, pp. 262–286, and July, pp. 24–41.
  • Two Letters to the New York Times, April 3 and 4, giving his reasons for using Speneer's “Study of Sociology” as a text-book.

  • 1880. The Administration of Andrew Jackson. Address before the Kent Club of the Yale Law School, briefly reported in the New York Tribune, April 29. Printed in full for the first time in Vol. IV, pp. 337–367.
  • The Revival of Ocean Commerce. k free-trade letter to the American Railroad Journal, September 10.
  • Professor Sumner's views respecting the tariff question. Letters to the New Haven Register, October 9,12, and 14.
  • The Financial Questions now before Us. Unpublished manuscript written about this time, 8 pp. (Sumner Estate.)

  • 1881. Elections And Civil Service Reform. Princeton Review, January, pp. 129–148.
  • Panic without Cause. Lecture in Brothers' Hall, New Haven, on the recent panic in Wall Street. New Haven Register, January 14.
  • The Argument Against Protective Taxes. Princeton Review, March, pp. 241–259.
  • Shall Americans Own Ships? North American Review, June, Vol. 132, No. CCXCV, pp. 559–566. Reprinted in Vol. IV, pp. 273–282.
  • Fortunes Made In Thread. Letter to the New York Times, June 5, on the peculiar protection given to the manufacturers of thread.
  • Sociology. Princeton Review, November, pp. 303–323. Reprinted in Vol. I, pp. 167–192.

  • 1882. Andrew Jackson as a Public Man. What he was, what chances he had, and what he did with them. Boston, New York, Houghton Miitlin Company. vi, 402 pp. (American Statesmen Series.)
  • Political Economy and Political Science. Comp. by W. G. Sumner, D. A. Wells, W. E. Foster, R. L. Dugdale, and G. H. Putnam. New York Society for Political Education. Cover title, 36 pp. Economic Tracts No. 2.
  • Protective Taxes and Wages. Philadelphia Tariff Commission, 21 pp. Caption title.
  • Bank Checks and Blankets. A free-trade letter to the New Haven Register, June 2.
  • The “American System.” A letter to the American Free-trade League, June.

  • 1882. Why should the Men of Iowa Levy Taxes on Themselves to Benefit Pennsylvania? Iowa State Leader, September 4.
  • The Free Play of Economic Forces. Letter to the Nation regarding Jevons's “State in Relation to Labor,” September 30.
  • Limber Prices. Letter to the Northwestern Lumberman, October 14. Professor Sumner's speech before the Tariff Commission, reviewed by George Basil Dixwell, Cambridge, J. Wilson & Son, 43 pp.
  • Professor Sumner's “Argument against Protective Taxes,” reviewed by George Basil Dixwell, Cambridge, J. Wilson & Son, 13 pp.
  • Wages. Princeton Review, November, pp. 241–262.

  • 1883. The Forgotten Man. The original lecture on this subject, delivered in New Haven February 8 or 9. 28 typewritten pp. Printed for the first time in Vol. IV, pp. 465–495.
  • What Social Classes Owe to each Other. First appeared in Harper's Weekly, February-May, Vol. XXVII, NOR. 1366–1376. New York, Harper & Brothers, 169 pp.
  • On the Case of a Certain Man who is never Thought Of. Reprinted in Vol. I, pp. 247–253, from “What Social Classes Owe to Each Other,” pp. 123–133.
  • The Case of the Forgotten Man Further Considered. Reprinted in Vol. I, pp. 257–268, from “What Social Classes Owe to Each Other,” pp. 134–152.
  • Best Public Opinion. Letter to the Gazette and Free Press, January 12, in reply to T. K. Bcecher.
  • Let Commercial Relations Alone. Letter to W. H. Knight in the Gazette and Free Press, January 16.
  • Letter to Mr. Earle of the American Free-trade League regarding a speech of Mr. Evarts's. Printed in the New York Times, February 6.
  • “Professor Sumner On Monetary Science.” Letter to the editor of Bradstreet's in which he disagrees with the theory of H. C. Adams that money laws in economics are dependent on the nation's sentiment as expressed in its legislative enactments. February 10.

  • 1883. “Professor Sumner Replies.” Letter to the New Haven Register, February 10, referring to his remarks about the protective tax on thread in his lecture on the “Forgotten Man.”
  • “Professor Sumiver's Presumption.” A defense of his letter to Mr. Earle regarding a speech of Mr. Evarts's. New York Times, February 14.
  • Willimantic Linen Mills. Letter to the New York Times, February 16, defending his position as taken against the protective tax on thread.
  • Some Facts about Thread. Unpublished manuscript, 14 pp., referring to the controversy with the Willimantic Linen Co. (Sumner Estate.)
  • A Theorist Answered. A free-trade letter to the New Haven Register, February 26, in reply to a letter signed “Hardpan.”
  • The Gain to the Country by Protection. Letter to the New York Times, February 27.
  • “Professor Sumner Instructs His Critics.” A free-trade letter to the New York Times, March 1.
  • That Census Puzzle. New York Times, March 2.
  • Protective Taxes and Wages. North American Review, March, Vol. 136, No. CCCXVI, pp. 270–276.
  • A Course of Reading in Political Economy. Prepared for The Critic, March, 4 pp.
  • The Tariff On Thread. Letter to the New York Times, March 8.
  • Thread. Letter to the Boston Transcript, April 25, regarding the Willimantic Linen Co.
  • Thread At Three Cents a Spool. Letter to the New York Times, April 28.
  • The Willimantic Mills' Profit. Letter to the Boston Transcript, April 30.
  • Letter to the Palladium (New Haven), April 30, regarding the controversy with the Willimantic Linen Co.
  • “Professor Sumner's Views.” Letter to the New Haven Register, May 26, in answer to Mr. Barrows of the Willimantic Linen Co.
  • The Philosophy of Strikes. Harper's Weekly, September 15, Vol. XXVII, No. 1395, p. 586. Reprinted in Vol. IV, pp. 239–246.

  • 1883. Letter to the New Haven Register, October 18, regarding the development of our industries.
  • “Professor Sumner's Views Respecting the Tariff Question.” New Haven Register, October 19.
  • “Mixed up Mr. Sheldon.” Letter to the New Haven Register, October 30, showing Mr. Sheldon's ignorance of tariff laws.
  • The Science Of Sociology. A Speech at the Farewell Banquet to Herbert Spencer. Delivered November 9, 1882, published in “Herbert Spencer on the Americans and the Americans on Herbert Spencer,” pp. 35–40. New York, D. Appleton & Company, 96 pp. Reprinted in Vol. IV, pp. 401–405.
  • Suggestions on Social Subjects. Passages selected from “What Social Classes owe to Each Other,” in the Popular Science Monthly, December, Vol. XXIV, pp. 160–169.
  • An American Criticism of British Protectionist Theories. A criticism of Professor Sidgwick's doctrine that protective taxes come out of the foreigner. The London Economist, December 1, Vol. XLI, No. 2,101, pp. 1397–1398.
  • The Democratic Theory of Public Offices. Address before the Civil Service Reform Association, Rochester, N. Y. Reasons for reform in the manner of selecting public officers. What would be gained by the change. Printed in the Rochester newspapers of the time. (Sumner Estate.)

  • 1884. Problems in Political Economy. New York, le mo., 125 pp. H. Holt & Co.
  • Our Colleges before the Country. Princeton Review, March, pp. 127–140. Reprinted in Vol. I, pp. 355–373.
  • Sociological Fallacies. North American Review, June, Vol. 138, No. CCCXXXI, pp. 574–579. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 357–364.
  • Evils Of The Tariff System. North American Review, September, Vol. 139, No. CCCXXXIV, pp. 293–299.

  • 1885. Protectionsm. The -Ism which Teaches that Waste makes Wealth. New York, H. Holt & Company, October, 12mo., 170 pp. Reprinted in Vol. IV, pp. 9–111.

  • 1885. Collected Essays in Political and Social Science. New York, H. Holt & Company, 173 pp. Contents: Bimetallism, Wages, The Argument against Protective Taxes, Sociology, Theory and Practice of Elections, Presidential Elections and Civil Service Reform, Our Colleges Before the Country.
  • Our Currency for the Last Twenty-five Years. Harper's Weekly, January 10- February 7, Vol. XXIX, Nos. 1464–1468.
  • Shall Silver be Demonetized? North American Review, June, Vol. 140, No. CCCXLIII, pp. 485–489.

  • 1886. Regulation of Contracts. How far have modern improvements in production and transportation changed the principle that men should be left free to make their own bargains? Science, March 5, Vol. VII, No. 161, pp. 225–228.
  • What is Free Trade? In Good Cheer for April, p. 7. Reprinted in Vol. IV, pp. 123–127.
  • Can Protection Increase the Wealth of the Country? The Tax-gatherer, May 22, No. 19.
  • Industrial War. Forum, September, Vol. II, pp. 1–8. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 93–102.
  • Mr. Blaine on the Tariff. North American Review, October, Vol. 143, No. CCCLIX, pp. 398–405.
  • What is the “Proletariat”? The Independent, October 28. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 161–165.
  • Who Win by Progress? The Independent, November 25. Reprinted iu Vol. III, pp. 169–174.
  • The New Social Issue. The Independent, December 23. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 207–212.
  • Subjects for Theses And Compositions. Prepared with notes and references attached to the subjects for Senior and Junior Classes, Yale College. I. Honor Theses in Political Science. II. Subjects for Required Compositions. 9 pp. (Sumner Estate.)
  • History of the United States of America, 1824–1876. Notes taken by J. C. Schwab, 1886–1887. MS 17½ x 25½ cm. Yale University Library.
  • Political Economy. Notes of lectures taken by J. C. Schwab, 1886–1887. MS 17½ x 25½ cm. Yale University Library.

  • 1887. Whxt Makes the Rich Richer and the Poor Poorer? Popular Science Monthly, January, Vol. XXX, pp. 289–296. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 65–77.
  • Socialism. Speech before the Massachusetts Reform Club, Boston, January 8. Boston Sunday Record, January 9.
  • Federal Legislation on Railroads. The Independent, January 20. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 177–182.
  • Legislation by Clamor. The Independent, February 24. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 185–190.
  • The Shifting Of Responsmility. The Independent, March 24. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 193–198.
  • Some Points In The New Social Creed. The Independent, April 21. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 207–211.
  • The Indians in 1887. Forum, May, Vol. HI, pp. 254–262.
  • Speculative Legislation. The Independent, May 19. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 215–219.
  • Unrestricted Commerce. Chautauquan, June.
  • The Banquet of Life. The Independent, June 28. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 217–221.
  • Some Natural Rights. The Independent, July 28. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 222–227.
  • Strikes and the Industrial Organrization. Popular Science News, July, Vol. XXI, No. 7, pp. 93–94. Reprinted in Vol. IV, pp. 249–253.
  • State Interference. North American Review, August, Vol. 145, No. CCCLXIX, pp. 109–119. Reprinted in Vol. I, pp. 213–226.
  • The Abolition of Poverty. The Independent, August 25. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 228–232.
  • The State as an “Ethical Person.” The Independent, October 6. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 201–204.
  • The Boon Of Nature. The Independent, October 27. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 233–238.
  • Civil Service Reform. Chautauquan, November, pp. 78–80.
  • Is Liberty a Lost Blessing? The Independent, November 24. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 131–135.
  • Advantages of Free Trade. The Christian Secretary. (Sumner Estate.)

  • 1888. Land Monopoly. The Independent, January 12. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 239–244.
  • A Group Of Natural Monopolies. The Independent, February 16. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 245–248.
  • The Fall in Silver and International Competition. Rand MeNally's Banker's Monthly, February, pp. 47–48.
  • The First Steps towards a Millennium. Cosmopolitan, March, pp. 32–36. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 93–105.
  • Another Chapter on Monopoly. The Independent, March 15. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 249–253.
  • Trusts and Trades-unions. The Independent, April 19. Reprinted in Vol. IV, pp. 257–262.
  • The Family Monopoly. The Independent, May 10. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 254–258.
  • The Family and Property. The Independent, June 14 and July 19. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 259–269.
  • Tariff Reform. The Independent, August 16. Reprinted in Vol. IV, pp. 115–120.
  • The State and Monopoly. The Independent, September 13 and October 11. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 270–279.
  • “A Condition not a Theory.” Free trade. Belford's Monthly Magazine, October, Vol. I, No. 5.
  • Democracy and Plutocracy. The Independent, November 15. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 283–289.
  • Definitions of Democracy and Plutocracy. The Independent, December 20. Reprinted in Vol II, pp. 290–295.

  • 1889. The Conflict of Plutocracy and Democracy. The Independent, January 10. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 296–300.
  • Peasant Emancipation in Denmark. Based on a review of Stavnsbaands-1øsningen og landboreformerne. Set fra nationaløkonomiens Standpunkt. Af V. Falbe Hansen, Copenhagen: Gad. 1888. The Nation, February 7, No. 1232, pp. 123–124.
  • Peasants and Land Tenure in Scandinavia. Unpublished manuscript, 20 typewritten pages, written in 1889 or later, covering the period from the earliest times to the eighteenth century. (Sumner Estate.)

  • 1889. Separation of State and Market. The Independent, February 14. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 306–311.
  • Democracy and Modern Problems. The Independent, March 28. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 301–305.
  • Social War In Democracy. The Independent, April 11. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 312–317,
  • An Examination of a Noble Sentiment. The Independent, May 16. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 212–216.
  • Sketch of William Graham Sumner. The Popular Science Monthly, June, Vol. XXXV, pp. 261–268. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 3–13.
  • An Old “Trust.” The Independent, June 13. Reprinted in Vol. IV, pp. 265–269.
  • What is Civil Liberty? The Popular Science Monthly, July, Vol. XXXV, pp. 289–303. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 109–130.
  • Who Is Free? Is It The Savage? The Independent, July 18. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 136–140.
  • Who Is Free? Is It The Civilized Man? The Independent, August 15. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 140–145.
  • Who Is Free? Is It The Millionaire? The Independent, September 12. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 145–150.
  • Who Is Free? Is It The Tramp? The Independent, October 17. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 159–155.
  • Liberty and Responsibility. The Independent, November 21. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 156–160.
  • Liberty and Law. The Independent, December 26. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 161–166.
  • DO We Want Industrial Peace? Forum, December, Vol. VIII, pp. 406–416. Reprinted in Vol. I, pp. 229–243.
  • Free Trade. Unpublished manuscript of about this date. I. Definitions of Protection and Protectionism. II. The Medieval Doctrine of Commerce. III. The Sixteenth Century. IV. The Dynastic States. V. Mercantilism and the Colonial System. VI. The New Doctrine. VII. Smithianismus. VIII. Protection in the United States. IX. Nineteenth-century Protectionism. X. The Present Situation. About 64 typewritten pages. (Sumner Estate.)

  • 1889. The Strikes. Unpublished manuscript written sometime in the eighties, 21 typewritten pages. A general survey of the “labor question.” (Sumner Estate.)
  • A Parable. Written in the eighties. Printed for the first time in Vol. IH, pp. 105–107.
  • The Sphere of Academical Instruction. Address delivered at the celebration of a school anniversary. To judge “what an academy is, what it ought to do, and how it ought to do it; and to judge of its achievements by true standards.” Unpublished manuscript of the eighties, 27 pages. (Sumner Estate.)
  • Integrity in Education. An address delivered in Hartford probably in the eighties. Printed for the first time in Vol. IV, pp. 409–419.
  • Discipline. Probably in the eighties. Printed for the first time in Vol. IV, pp. 423–438.
  • The Challenge of Facts. Written sometime in the eighties. Original title was Socialism. Printed for the first time in Vol. III, pp. 17–52.

  • 1890. Alexander Hamilton. (“Makers of America.”) New York, 12mo., 280 pp., Dodd, Mead & Co.
  • Liberty and Discipline. The Independent, January 16. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 166–171.
  • Does Labor Brutalize? The Independent, February 20. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 187–193.
  • Liberty and Property. The Independent, March 27. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 171–176.
  • Liberty and Opportunity. The Independent, April 24. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 176–181.
  • Why I Am a Free Trader. Twentieth Century, April 24, pp. 8–10.
  • Can We Get More Money? Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, May 3, Vol. LXX, No. 1807.
  • Liberty And Labor. The Independent, May 22. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 181–187.
  • Proposed Silver Legislation. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, May 24, Vol. LXX, No. 1810, p. 330.
  • Liberty and Machinery. The Independent, June 12. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 193–198.
  • The Disappointment of Liberty. The Independent, July 17. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 198–203.

  • 1890. What Emancipates. The Independent, August 14. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 137–142.
  • The Demand for Men. The Independent, September 11. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 111–116.
  • The Significance of the Demand for Men. The Independent, October 16. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 119–123.
  • What the “Social Question” Is. The Independent, November 20. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 127–133.

  • 1891. The Financier and the Finances Of the American Revolution. New York, 2 vols., 8vo., 309 and 330 pp.
  • Liberté des ÉChanges. Nouveau Dictionnaire d'Économie Politique, vol. 2, pp. 138–166, Guillaumin et Cie., Paris.
  • Power and Progress. The Independent, January 15. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 145–150.
  • Consequences of Increased Social Power. The Independent, August 13. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 153–158.

  • 1892. Robert Mopmis (“Makers of America”). New York, 12mo., 172 pp.

  • 1893. Proposed Classification of the Social Sciences. A chart printed for distribution to the classes in Social Science in Yale University. “Not published.”

  • 1894. The Absurd Effort to Make the World Over. Forum, March, Vol. XVII, pp. 92–102. Reprinted in Vol. I, pp. 195–210.

  • 1895. The Venezuela Message. Letter to the New York Times, December 18.

  • 1896. History of Banking in the United States. XV, 485 pp. Being Vol. I of A History of Banking in all the Leading Nations.
  • “Professor Sumner on Yale.” Letter to The Yale News, January 20. Learning is more appreciated here now than thirty years ago.
  • The Currency Crisis. A course of six lectures given at the house of Mr. John E. Parsons, 30 East 36th St., New York City, February 13 and 27 and March 5, 12, 19, and 26. What the lecturer said, as well as the questions and answers at the end of his lectures, was taken down in shorthand and typewritten. Mr. Herbert

  • 1896. Parsons has the transcript in bound form, and the Yale University Library also has a copy. (Sumner Estate.)
  • The Treasury as a Bank Of Issue and a Silver Warehouse. The Bond Record, March, Vol. IV, No. 2, pp. 87–89.
  • An Answer to Mr. Tighe's Letter on Yale's Veneozuelan Attitude. Letter to the Yale Alumni Weekly, May 20, Vol. V, No. 30, pp. 1–2.
  • The Fallacy of Territorial Extension. Forum, June, Vol. XXI, pp. 416–419. Reprinted in Vol. I, pp. 285–293.
  • A Few Words. Short address as member of the State Board of Education at the graduating exercises of the New Haven Normal School, June 18. (Sumner Estate.)
  • The Policy Of Debasement. “The Battle of the Standards.” New York Journal, July 29.
  • The Proposed Dual Organization Of Mankind. Popular Science Monthly, August, Vol. XLIX, pp. 433–439. Reprinted in Vol. I, pp. 271–281.
  • Prosperity Strangled by Gold. Leslie's Weekly, August 20. Reprinted in Vol. IV, pp. 141–145.
  • Cause And Cure of Hard Times. Leslie's Weekly, September 3. Reprinted in Vol. IV, pp. 149–153.
  • The Free-coinage Scheme Is Impracticable at Every Point. Leslie's Weekly, September 10. Reprinted in Vol. IV, pp. 157–162.
  • Delusion Of the Debtors. Leslie's Weekly, September 17. Reprinted in Vol. IV, pp. 165–170.
  • The Crime Of 1873. Leslie's Weekly, September 24. Reprinted in Vol. IV, pp. 173–180.
  • The Single Gold Standard. Chautauquan, October, Vol. XXIV, pp. 72–77.
  • Banks of Issue in the United States. Forum, October, Vol. XXII, pp. 182–191.
  • Earth Hunger or the Philosophy of Land Grabbing. Printed for the first time in Vol. II, pp. 31–64.
  • A Free Coinage Catechism. Reprinted from The Evening Post, The Evening Post Publishing Co., New York, 16 pp.
  • Lectures On American History, Yale University, 1896–1897. Notes taken by J. C. Schwab. MS. 13 x 21 cm. Yale University Library.

  • 1896. Advancing Social and Political Organization in the United States. 1896 or 1897. Printed for the first time in Vol. III, pp. 289–344.

  • 1897. The Teacher's Unconscious Success. Address given at a dinner held in honor of Mr. Henry Barnard, at Jewel Hall, Hartford, January 25. Printed for the first time in Vol. II, pp. 9–13.
  • Money And Currency. A course of four lectures delivered in Boston. I. The Anxiety Lest there be not Money Enough. II. How We Resumed Specie Payments in 1879. What We Did Not Do. III. The Single Gold Standard - A Beneficent and Accomplished Fact. IV. Where we now Stand and what we have to Do. Syllabus.
  • Sociology. A course of six lectures given in Albany, February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 27, and April 3. Introduction. Individuality and Sociality. Property. Industrialism and Militarism. Population. Mental Reaction on Experience. Suggested Books for a Course of Reading. Syllabus.
  • The Orgin of the Dollar. Paper read at meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science at Toronto, August 19–25. (Sumner Estate.)
  • Outline of a Proposed Curriculum (for Yale College). 4 pages typewritten manuscript. (Sumner Estate.)

  • 1898. The Spanish Dollxr and the Colonial Shilling. American Historical Review, Vol. III, No. 4, pp. 607–619.
  • Syllabus of six lectures given during January and February in Plainfield, N. J. I. What is a Free Man and a Free State? II. What is Democracy? III. Aggregations of Wealth and Plutocracy. IV. The Rich and the Poor. V. Woman. VI. Immigration.
  • Leiter has been a Hero. Letter to The World, New York, June 15, on the Joseph Leiter deal.
  • The Coin Shilling of Massachusetts Bay. Yale Review, November, Vol. VII, pp. 247–264, and February, 1899, Vol. VII, pp. 405–420.

  • 1899. The Conquest of the United States by Spain. A lecture before the Phi Beta Kappa Society of Yale University, January 16. Yale Law Journal, Vol. VIII,

  • 1899. No. 4, pp. 168–193. Boston, D. Estes & Co., 82 pp. 23 cm. Reprinted in Vol. I, pp. 297–334.
  • The Power and Beneficence of Capital. Proceedings of the Sixth Annual Convention of The Savings Banks Association of the State of New York, held at the Rooms of the Chamber of Commerce, 32 Nassau Street, New York, May 10; pp. 77–95. J. S. Babcock, New York, printer. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 337–353.

  • 1900. First Fruits of Expansion. New York Evening Post, April 14, p. 13.
  • The Predicament of Sociological Study. Printed for the first time in Vol. III, pp. 415–425. Original title of manuscript was “Sociology.” Written about 1900.
  • Purposes and Consequences. Printed for the first time in Vol. II, pp. 67–75. Written sometime between 1900 and 1906.
  • Rigrts. Printed for the first time in Vol. II, pp. 79–83. Written sometime between 1900 and 1906.
  • Equality. Printed for the first time in Vol. II, pp. 87–89. Written sometime between 1900 and 1906.

  • 1901. The Anthracite Coal Industry, by Peter Roberts. Introduction by W. G. Sumner. New York, London, Macmillan Co., 261 pp. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 387–388.
  • Specimens Of Investment Securities for Class Room Use. New Haven, The E. P. Judd Co., 32 pp., 27 x 35½ cm. Verbatim reprints of a large number of shares, certificates, bonds, and other evidences of ownership of debt, without independent text or comment: collected for use in college instruction.
  • Trusts. Journal of Commerce, June 24.
  • The Predominant Issue. Burlington, Vt. Reprinted from the International Monthly, November, Vol. 2, pp. 496–509. Reprinted in Vol. I, pp. 337–352.
  • The Yakuts. Abridged from the Russian of Sieroshevski. Journal of the Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, Vol. 31, pp. 65–110.
  • 1905. Suicidal Fanaticism in Russia. The Popular Science Monthly, March, Vol. LX, pp. 442–447.
  • The Concentration of Wealth: Its Economic Justification. The Independent, April-June. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 81–90.

  • 1903. Autobiographical Sketch of William Graham Sumner. A History of the Class of 1863, Yale College, pp. 165–167. New Haven, The Turtle, Morehouse & Taylor Co., 1905. Reprinted in Vol. II, pp. 3–5.
  • War. Printed for the first time in Vol. I, pp. 3–40.

  • 1904. Reply to a Socialist (The Fallacies of Socialism). Collier's Weekly, October 29, pp. 12–13. Reprinted in Vol. HI, pp. 55–62.

  • 1905. Lynch-law, by James Elbert Cutler. Foreword by W. G. Sumner. New York, Longmans, Green, and Co., v, 287 pp. Reprinted in Vol. III, pp. 383–384.
  • Economics Xnd Politics. Printed for the first time in Vol. II, pp. 318–333.
  • The Scientific Attitude of Mind. Address to initiates of the Sigma Xi Society, Yale University, on March 4. Printed for the first time in Vol. II, pp. 17–28.

  • 1906. Protectionism Twenty Years After. (Title given by editor.) Address at a dinner of the Committee on Tariff Reform of the Tariff Reform Club in the City of New York, June 2. Published by the Reform Club Committee on Tariff Reform, 42 Broadway, New York, N. Y. Series 1906, No. 4, 7 pp., August 15. Reprinted in Vol. IV, pp. 131–138.

  • 1907. Folkways: A Study of the Sociological Importance of Usages, Manners, Customs, Mores, and Morals. Bos ton, Ginn & Co., v, 692 pp.
  • Sociology as a College Subject. American Journal of Sociology, March, Vol. 12, No. 5, pp. 597–599. Re printed in Vol. III, pp. 407–411.

  • 1908. Decline Of Confidence. Annual Financial and Commercial Review, New York Herald, January 2.

  • 1909. What is Sane Tariff Reform? Annual Financial and Commercial Review, New York Herald, January 4.
  • The Family and Social Change. American Journal of Sociology, March, Vol. 14, No. 5, pp. 577–591. Reprinted in Vol. I, pp. 43–61.
  • Witchcraft. Forum, May, Vol. XLI, pp. 410–423. Reprinted in Vol. I, pp. 105–126.
  • Autobiography and List of Books Published. Facsimile of letter and photograph in The Yale Courant, May, Vol. XLV, No. 7, on occasion of Sumner's retirement.

  • 1909. The Status of Women in Chaldea, Egypt, India, Judea, and Greece to the Time of Christ. Forum, August, Vol. XLII, pp. 113–136. Reprinted in Vol. I, pp. 65–102.
  • The Mores of the Present and the Future. Yale Review, November, Vol. XVHI, pp. 233–245. Reprinted in Vol. I, pp. 149–164.

  • 1910. Relmion and the Mores. American Journal of Sociology, Murch, Vol. 15, No. 5, pp. 577–591. Reprinted in Vol. I, pp. 129–146.
  • Comment On William Graham Sumner. (Died April 12.) The Pioneer, Henry W. Farman. The Teacher, J. C. Schwab. The Inspirer, Irving Fisher. The Idealist, Clive Day. The Man, Albert G. Keller. The Veteran, Richard T. Ely. Yale Review, May, Vol. XIX, pp. 1–12.
  • Memorial Addresses. Delivered June 19, in Lampson Lyceum, Yale University, by Otto T. Bannard, Henry De Forest Baldwin, and Albert Galloway Keller. Printed in Vol. III, pp. 429–450.

posthumous

  • 1911. War. Yale Review (New Series), October, Vol. I, No. 1, pp. 1–27. Printed in Vol. I, pp. 3–40.
  • War and Other Essays. New Haven, Yale University Press, 381 pp.
  • 1913. Earth Hunger or the Philosophy Of Land Grabbing. Yale Review (New Series), October, Vol. III, No. 1, pp. 3–32. Printed in Vol. II, pp. 31–64.
  • Earth Hunger And Other Essays. New Haven, Yale University Press, 377 pp.
  • 1914. The Challenge of Facts and Other Essays. New Haven, Yale University Press, 450 pp.
  • 1918. The Forgotten Man and Other Essays. New Haven, Yale University Press, 559 pp.

Last modified April 13, 2016