Online Library of Liberty

A collection of scholarly works about individual liberty and free markets. A project of Liberty Fund, Inc.

Advanced Search

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Mozart’s Opera Marriage of Figaro, containing the Italian text, with an English translation, and the Music of all of the Principal Airs [1786]

1398_tp
Title Page

Edition used:

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Mozart’s Opera Marriage of Figaro, containing the Italian text, with an English translation, and the Music of all of the Principal Airs (Boston: Oliver Ditson Co., 1888). http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2219

Available in the following formats:
Facsimile PDF 2.7 MB This is a facsimile or image-based PDF made from scans of the original book.
Kindle 1.75 MB This is an E-book formatted for Amazon Kindle devices.
EBook PDF 3.03 MB This text-based PDF or EBook was created from the HTML version of this book and is part of the Portable Library of Liberty.
HTML 426 KB This version has been converted from the original text. Every effort has been taken to translate the unique features of the printed book into the HTML medium.
Simplified HTML 426 KB This is a simplifed HTML format, intended for screen readers and other limited-function browsers.

About this Title:

One of Mozart’s most popular operas, with a libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte, based upon the notorious play by Beaumarchais. The play had been banned in 1786 because it questioned the legitimacy and rationality of the aristocracy by making fun of it through the eyes of a common servant, Figaro. This version is a side-by-side Italian and English edition.

Copyright information:

The text is in the public domain.

Fair use statement:

This material is put online to further the educational goals of Liberty Fund, Inc. Unless otherwise stated in the Copyright Information section above, this material may be used freely for educational and academic purposes. It may not be used in any way for profit.

Table of Contents:

Edition: current; Page: [1]
MOZART’S OPERA MARRIAGE OF FIGARO,
CONTAINING THE ITALIAN TEXT, WITH AN ENGLISH TRANSLATION, AND The Music of all the Principal Airs.
BOSTON:
OLIVER DITSON COMPANY.
new york:
C. H. Ditson & Co.
chicago:
Lyon & Healy.
Copyright, 1860, by Oliver Ditson & Co.
philadelphia:
J. E. Ditson & Co.
boston:
John C. Haynes & Co.
Copyright, 1888, by Oliver Ditson & Co.
Edition: current; Page: [2] Edition: current; Page: [3]

DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.

COUNT ALMAVIVA. Grand Corregidor of Andalusia. BARITONE.
FIGARO. His valet-de-chambre, and major-domo of the chateau. BASS.
DOCTOR BARTOLO. A Physician of Seville. BASS.
DON BASILIO. Music-master to the Countess. TENOR.
CHERUBINO. The Count’s head-page. SOPRANO.
ANTONIO. Gardener to the Chateau, uncle to Susanna, and father to Barbarina. BASS.
DON CURZIO. Counsellor-at-law. TENOR.
COUNTESS ALMAVIVA. SOPRANO.
SUSANNA. Her head waiting-woman, affianced to Figaro. SOPRANO.
MARCELLINA. A duenna. SOPRANO.
BARBARINA. Daughter of Antonio. SOPRANO.

Peasants, male and female; Officers of Court, Valets, Bravos, &c. &c.

the scene is laid at the chateau of agnas frescas, three leagues from seville.

first performed at vienna, in 1786

Edition: current; Page: [4]

ARGUMENT.

Count Almaviva, the well-known hero of Rossini’s Barber of Seville, after the romantic marriage with Rosina, the ward of Doctor Bartolo, of which that Opera treats, had settled down quietly upon his estates. Figaro, the barber, had been awarded the post of major domo of the castle by the Count, in payment for past services. Figaro, while in his new station, had conceived a passion for Susanna, the pretty and cunning waiting-woman of the Countess, and they were shortly to be married. Unfortunately for the gay ex-barber, he had, while in a state of less prosperity, given a written promise to an old, but rich spinster, Marcellina, to marry her on a certain day, upon which promise he had been furnished with various snug sums by the would be Mrs. Figaro. When fortune smiled upon him, however, he forgot his old attachment entirely, and, by an ill choice, fixed the date of his union with Susanna on the same day, on which he was to have married Marcellina. This venerable dame, with the assistance of Doctor Bartolo, who owed Figaro an old grudge on account of his ward Rosina, who had been snatched from him principally through the instrumentality of the barber, made secret preparations to interrupt the nuptial festivities with a tremendous thunder shower.

The Count Almaviva, since he enjoyed the quiet possession of his most excellent wife, began to bestow more attentions on the female portion of his household, particularly on Susanna, than were absolutely necessary, evincing at the same time an unreasonably jealous disposition towards the Countess. The Count had in his service a lad, by the name of Cherubino, a young scapegrace, passionately fond of the other sex, always in love, in truth, a Don Giovanni in embryo. This Cherubino was, when our story opens, under orders to leave for the army immediately, in punishment for a misdemeanor, which he had been guilty of.

Figaro, who was extremely annoyed by his master’s behavior towards Susanna, and truly sorry for his groundless jealousy towards the Countess, bethought himself of a plan to bring the Count back into the bounds of propriety. In the first place he sent a letter to the Count, informing him that the Countess had made an appointment to meet somebody at the evening’s ball. Arousing thus the Count’s suspicion, and disturbing his peace of mind, Figaro calculated better to prepare him for the snare which was to be laid. Susanna was to get a message to the Count that she would meet him in the garden, that night. Cherubino, kept back in the castle against the Count’s orders, was to act Susanna’s part, and the Countess to surprise the frail husband with the supposed Susanna.

In order to effect the necessary transformation for his new character, Cherubino was admitted to the room of the Countess, where Susanna, under the Superintendence of the Countess, began to make the change of wardrobe necessary. While this was going on, and Susanna had just stepped out into her room—to the left—to take away the page’s coat and fetch him one of her dresses, the Count tried to gain access by the principal—middle—entrance, and finding this locked—an occurrence against all precedents—he began to knock vehemently. Cherubino quickly fled into the chamber of the Countess—to the right—and the Countess opened the door. The Count, who had just received Figaro’s anonymous letter, could not help noticing the confusion of the Countess. He had heard voices in the room, when he approached it. The Countess protested she had been talking to herself. The Count showed her Figaro’s letter. Here unfortunately Cherubino in the adjoining chamber upset a chair. Up started the Count, demanding who was in there. Nobody but Susanna, insisted the Countess. The Count called to Susanna to come out; his wife commanded her to stay in. But Susanna was listening from the door opposite to these strange proceedings, and, of course, came not, nor the frightened page. At last the Count went out, to get a crowbar, with which to open the door of the cabinet, the Countess accompanying him. He securely fastened the middle door after their exit.

Now Susanna quickly released the page, got him his coat, made him jump out of the window which opened upon the garden, and then went herself into the chamber just quitted by Cherubino. When the Count and Countess returned, and the Count had wrung from his wife the confession that the page was there, half undressed, the sudden appearance of Susanna in the door of the apartment took both completely by surprise. But the Countess quickly gained her composure, and the two women now turned the tables upon the Count, who ruefully asked his wife’s forgiveness for his unjust suspicions. The Countess granted it in good grace. Figaro came in, to accompany Susanna to the wedding. A little while after him, as his unlucky stars would have it, Antonio, the gardener, half intoxicated, carrying a couple of broken flower-pots, made his appearance in the room. He insisted he must see his master. He wanted to lodge a complaint against some one who had jumped out of the window from the Countess’ room, broken some of his flower-pots, and escaped through the garden. Figaro with great difficulty quieted the Count’s newly arisen suspicions, by avowing himself the culprit. At this moment Marcellina, duly accompanied by her counsel, appeared and lodged a complaint with the Count against Figaro for breach of promise. Almaviva, inwardly rejoicing at the turn affairs took, and thinking to profit by it, evinced great interest in the case. When it came to the trial, however, it was discovered that Figaro was the child of Marcellina and Doctor Bartolo, by which timely discovery every obstacle to Figaro’s and Susanna’s union was removed.

Accordingly the festivals took then course. In the meanwhile Susanna, upon the advice of the Countess, and without the knowledge of her betrothed, carried on the intrigue originally plotted by Figaro. She sought an interview with the Count, and expressed her willingness to conform to his wishes. Afterwards she wrote a note to him—dictated by the Countess—appointing time and place of a meeting. Of this appointment Figaro—through the simplicity of a peasant girl, entrusted with the Count’s answer to Susanna—got wind, and forthwith collected a number of stout villagers, who were to administer to the Count a sound cudgeling under cover of the darkness.

When evening came round, the two ladies—the Countess dressed as Susanna, and Susanna as the Countess—repaired to the spot appointed in the letter, a secluded part of the park with a pavilion on either side. Figaro lay already in waiting, of which the ladies were well aware. Susanna then withdrew into the shade of the thicket, leaving her mistress alone waiting for the Count. Suddenly Cherubino came in, who, it seems, had made an appointment with Barbarina, the gardener’s daughter, on the same spot. Mistaking the Countess for Susanna, he dallied with her, kissing her much against her will, till at last the Count interfered, when the boy ran into the pavilion to the left, where Barbarina was already waiting for him. The Countess now received graciously the passionate words of her husband, intended for Susanna. Figaro, who was duped as much as the Count, then made a noise, and the Count sent the supposed Susanna into the pavilion on the right, expecting to join her ere long. Susanna managed to meet Figaro. But the cunning barber soon looked through her disguise, and then took an active part in the joke, by addressing her as the Countess, in passionate language. This was well done; for the Count overheard him, and seized him by the collar. Susanna ran into the pavilion on the left. The Count then, without releasing his hold on Figaro, called his servants and guests, who came in large numbers with lights and torches, and bade them to be witnesses of his dishonor. After disposing of Cherubino and Barbarina, who were also in the left hand pavilion, he dragged out the supposed Countess, who fell down on her knees before him, imploring his forgiveness. But the Count acted the enraged husband in good earnest. Suddenly the real Countess appeared from the pavilion on the right. Before the Count could fully realize his awkward position, the Countess, with the assistance of Susanna and Figaro, hushed matters up, and hurried the witnesses of this most extraordinary denouement off to the festivities in honor of Figaro’s marriage, which were going on in the castle. The Count must be supposed to be forever healed from his jealousy, and become more faithfully attached than ever before to his Rosina.

Edition: current; Page: [5]

LE NOZZE DI FIGARO.
(THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO.)

ATTO I.

ACT I.

SCENA I.—: Camera quasi smobiliata con un seggiolone nel mezzo. Figaro sta misurando con una canna il pavimento per lungo e per largo. Susanna si aggiusta davanti uno specchio, un capellino della Contessa in testa.

SCENE I.—: A Room only half furnished; near the centre a large arm-chair. Figaro is discovered, measuring out a space with a rule, while Susanna stands before a large glass, trying on the Countess’s hat, and admiring herself.

Susanna e Figaro.

Fig.
  • Cinque—dieci—venti—trenta—
  • Trentasei—quarantatre.
Sus.
  • Ora sì ch’io son contenta,
  • Sembra fatto in ver per me.
Fig.
  • Cinque.
Sus.
  • Guarda un pò, mio caro Figaro.
Fig.
  • Dieci.
Sus.
  • Guarda un pòmio, caro Figaro.
Fig.
  • Venti.
Sus.
  • Guarda un pò.
Fig.
  • Trenta.
Sus.
  • Guarda un pò, guarda adesso il mio capello.
Fig.
  • Trentasei.
Sus.
  • Guarda adesso il mio capello.
Fig.
  • Quarantatre.
Sus.
  • Guarda un pò, mio caro Figaro!
  • Guarda adesso, il mio capello.
Fig.
  • Sì mio core or è più bello,—
  • Sembra fatto in ver per me.
  • Ah! il mattino alle nozze vicino,
Sus. {
  • Quanto è dolce al miotuo tenero sposo,
Fig. {
  • Questo bel cappellino vezzoso—
  • “Che Susanna, ella stessa si fè!”
Sus.
  • Cosa stai misurando.
  • Caro il mio Figaretto?
Fig.
  • Io guardo se quel letto,
  • Che ci destina il Conte,
  • Farà buona figura in questo loco.
Sus.
  • In questa stanza?
Fig.
  • Certo, a noi la cede.
  • Generoso il padrone.
Sus.
  • Io per me te la dono.
Fig.
  • Io non capisco.
  • Perchè tanto ti spiace.
  • La più comoda stanza del palazzo.
Sus.
  • Perch’io son la Susanna,
  • E tu sei pazzo.
Fig.
  • Grazie, non tanti elogi!
  • Guarda un poco, se potria.
  • Meglio stare in altro loco.

Susanna and Figaro.

Fig.
  • Fourteen—sixteen—twenty—thirty.
  • Six-and-thirty—yes, yes, ’twill do.
Sus.
  • Ah! the mirror tells me clearly,
  • That the hat becomes me, too.
Fig.
  • Fourteen.
Sus.
  • Pray admire it, dearest Figaro.
Fig.
  • Sixteen.
Sus.
  • Pray admire it, dearest Figaro.
Fig.
  • Twenty.
Sus.
  • Pray admire.
Fig.
  • Thirty.
Sus.
  • Pray admire; it gives me pleasure.
Fig.
  • Six-and-thirty.
Sus.
  • Pray admire; it gives me pleasure.
Fig.
  • Yes, yes, ’twill do.
Sus.
  • Only see this hat, dear Figaro!
  • Pray admire; it gives me pleasure.
Fig.
  • Yes, I see it plain, my treasure,—
  • How the hat sits well on you.
Sus. {
  • Oh! the happy and beautiful morning,
  • When the heart with delight is beating,
Fig. {
  • At the altar of love repeating—
  • “Dearest one, I am ever now thine.”
Sus.
  • What makes you there so busy measuring,
  • Dear Figaretto?
Fig.
  • I’m seeing if the couch, love,
  • The Count intends to give us,
  • Is suited well to stand in this same corner.
Sus.
  • In this apartment?
Fig.
  • Truly, his Lordship gives the room.
  • To us, dear Susanna.
Sus.
  • I’ll have naught to do with it.
Fig.
  • I do not understand.
  • Why you should thus object.
  • To the pleasantest chamber in the palace.
Sus.
  • Why, because I’m Susanna,
  • And you’re a booby.
Fig.
  • Thank you; but spare your flattery;
  • See, now, if you can discover.
  • A better situation.

Duetto.—Susanna e Figaro.

Fig.
  • Se a caso madama
  • La notte ti chiama;
  • Din, din! In due passi,
  • Da quella puoi gir.
  • Vien poi l’occasione,
  • Che vuolmi il padrone,
  • Don, don! in tre salti,
  • Lo vado a servir.
Sus.
  • Così; se il mattino,
  • [Ironica.
  • Il caro Contino,
  • Din, din!
  • E ti manda tre miglia lontan,
  • Din, din! Don, don!
  • A mia porta il diavolo porta,
  • Ed ecco in tre salti—
Fig.
  • Susanna, pian pian.
Sus.
  • Ascolta, in tre salti,
  • Din, din! Don, don!
  • Ascolta—
Fig.
  • Fa presto.
Sus.
  • Se udir brami il resto;
  • Discaccia i sospetti che torto mi fan.
Fig.
  • Udir bramo il resto;
  • I dubbj, i sospetti gelare mi fan.
Sus.
  • Discaccia i sospetti, i sospetti.
Fig.
  • I dubbj, i sospetti gelare mi fan.
Sus.
  • Or bene, ascolta, e taci.
Fig.
  • Parla, che c’è di nuovo?
Sus.
  • Il Signor Conte,
  • Stanco d’andar, cacciando le straniere
  • Bellezze forestiere:—vuole ancor
  • Nel castello, ritentar la sua sorte.
  • N’è già di sua consorte,
  • Bada bene, appetito gli viene!
Fig.
  • E di chi dunque?
Sus.
  • Della tua Susannetta.
Fig.
  • Di te?
Sus.
  • Di me, medesma. E tucredevi,
  • Che fosse la mia dote
  • Merto del tuo bel muso!
Fig.
  • Menèria lusingato.
  • [Suona un campanello.
  • Che suona?—La Contessa.
Sus.
  • Addio—addio—addio—
  • Figaro bello.
Fig.
  • Cotaggio; mio tesoro.
Sus.
  • E tu cervello.
  • [Susanna parte.
Fig.
  • [Al se stesso] Bravo, Signor Padrone!
  • Ora incomincio a capir il mistero;
  • E a veder schietto,
  • Tutto il vostro progetto.
  • A Londra è vero? voi ministro—
  • Io corriero—e la Susanna
  • Secreta ambasciatrice.
  • Non sarà—non sarà—
  • Figaro il dice!
Edition: current; Page: [6]

Duet.—Susanna and Figaro.

Fig.
  • By night, if my lady
  • Should want you, you’re ready;
  • Ding, dong! a few paces,
  • And you’re close at hand.
  • Or, if that the case be,
  • His lordship should need me,
  • Ding, dong! in three paces
  • Before him I stand.
Sus.
  • No doubt; and some morning,
  • [Ironically.
  • Without any warning,
  • Ding, dong!
  • And his lordship will send you o’er sea,
  • Ding, dong!
  • Then the devil will lead him to me
  • In less than three paces.
Fig.
  • Susanna, enough.
Sus.
  • But hear me. In a minute,
  • Ding, dong!
  • But hear me—
Fig.
  • Make haste, then.
Sus.
  • Well! mark, now, what follows;
  • And leave me by evil suspicions unvex’d.
Fig.
  • Let’s hear, then, the sequel;
  • And yet I cannot get me rid of these doubts.
Sus.
  • Abandon your doubtings, abandon misgivings.
Fig.
  • I cannot get free from suspicion and doubt.
Sus.
  • But now, sir, attend, and mark me.
Fig.
  • Speak, then; I’m all attention.
Sus.
  • It seems his lordship,
  • Weaty of roaming forth in search of beauty,
  • Has come to this conclusion:—it were better
  • To seek it at home, in his castle.
  • His wife is out of question;
  • Only guess, then, who has now caught his fancy?
Fig.
  • It passes guessing.
Sus.
  • Why, your own Susannetta.
Fig.
  • Not you?
Sus.
  • Yes, I, so please you. Do you believe now,
  • That his lordship gives my dowry
  • Merely to pay your service!
Fig.
  • I really did suppose it.
  • [A bell rings.
  • Who rings there? ’Tis the Countess.
Sus.
  • Farewell—farewell—farewell—
  • Farewell, Figaro dearest.
Fig.
  • Fear nothing; be of courage.
Sus.
  • And you too, madcap.
  • [Exit Susanna.
Fig.
  • [To himself.] Bravo, my lord and master.
  • I do begin, sir, to perceive your purpose;
  • I’m blind no longer,
  • But see through all your plottings.
  • You go to London with despatches—
  • I’m your courier—and our Susanna
  • Ambassadress in secret.
  • It shan’t be—it shan’t be:
  • Figaro defies you!
lf1398_figure_001.jpg
Edition: current; Page: [7]
lf1398_figure_002.jpg

SE VUOL BALLARE—HAPLY YOUR LORDSHIP. Figaro.

  • Saprò, saprò, saprò, saprò, saprò;—
  • Ma piano, piano, piano, piano, piano, piano, piano.
  • Meglio ogni arcano,
  • Dissimulando,
  • Scoprir potrò.
  • L’arte schermando,
  • L’arte adoprando,
  • Di quà pugnando,
  • Di là scherzando,
  • Tutto le macchine
  • Rovescierò,—rovescierò.

Entrano Bartolo e Marcellina, con un contratto in mano, sequiti da Susanna, che ascolta al fondo.

Bart.

Ed aspettate il giorno fissato per le nozze, a parlarmi di questo?

Mar.

Io non mi perdo, dottor mio, di corraggio; per romper der sponsali più avanzati di questo—bastò spesso un pretesto; ed egli ha mecò, oltre questo contratto certi impegni—so io—basta! Convien con arte impunti, gliarla a rifiutare il Conte, egli per vendicarsi, prenderà il mio partito, e Figaro così fia mio marito.

Bart.

Bene, io tutto farò! Senza riserva, tutto a me palesate. [A parte.] Avrei pur gusto di dar in moglie la mia serva antica, a chi mi fece un dì rapir l’amica!

  • I know, I know, I know, I know, I know;—
  • But piano, piano, piano, piano, piano, piano, piano.
  • I shall learn better,
  • All to the letter,
  • If I am still.
  • Jesting and laughing,
  • Feasting and quaffing,
  • Singing and playing,
  • Compliments paying,
  • All his close stratagems
  • I shall find out,—yes, I’ll find out.

Enter Bartolo and Marcellina, with a Contract in her hand, followed by Susanna, who listens at the back.

Bart.

But why have you awaited the day fixed for the marriage ere you mention this matter?

Mar.

’Tis of the latest, doctor—that must be granted; and yet what signifies it? I have broken a marriage much more advanced than this is; for slander often, if well aimed, can work wonders. Know, this contract is not all—basta! Let’s first get the bride into disgrace. Were she but once persuaded to scorn Almaviva’s love-approaches, he then, from disappointment, would assist me, I’m certain, and Figaro compel to be my husband.

Bart.

Bravo, good Marcellina; I’ll be your second, but from me you’ll keep nothing. [Aside.] What pleasure shall I find in foisting our cross antique duenna upon the knave who robbed me of my mistress.

Aria—Bartolo.

  • La vendetta! O, la vendetta!
  • E un piacer serbato ai saggi,
  • Obbliar l’onte gl’oltraggi.
  • Obbliar l’onte gl’oltraggi,
  • E bassezza è ognor viltà.
  • Coll’ astuzia, coll’ arguzia,
  • Col giudizio, col criterio,
  • Si potrebbe, si potrebbe,
  • Il fatto è serio,
  • Ma credete si sarà.
  • Se tutto il codice dovessi volgere,
  • Se tutto l’indice dovessi leggere,
  • Con un equivico, con un sinonimo,
  • Qualche garbuglio si troverà.
  • Tutta Siviglia conosce Bartolo—
  • Il birbo Figaro vinto sarò.
  • [Bartolo parte.
Mar.

[Sola.] Tutto ancor non ho perso; mi resta la speranza. Ma Susanna si avanza. [Susanna appare indietro, con una cuffia da notte, un nastro, ed una vesta da camera in mano.] Io vò provarmi—fingiam di non vederla. E quella buona perla lo vorebbe sposar.

Sus.

Di mi favella.

Mar.

Ma da Figaro al fine, non può meglio sperarsi?—“L’argent fait tout.”

Sus.

[Avvanzandosi.] Che lingua! Manco male ch’ognun sa quanto vale.

Mar.

Brava! questo è giudizio!—con quegl’ occhi modesti!—con quell’ aria pietosa! E poi—

Sus.

Meglio è partir.

Mar.

[Ironica.] Che cara sposa!

Air—Bartolo.

  • Vengeance glorious! oh, vengeance glorious!
  • There is nothing half so pleasant,
  • In the past or for the present;
  • None but folks of little merit
  • Tamely suffer a wrong from man.
  • Mask’d and smiling,
  • All beguiling,
  • I can manage greater matters,
  • Than the fool who idly chatters,
  • In my sure and quiet way.
  • I’ll stop at nothing my purpose to carry,
  • And break down the hope of the fools who would marry.
  • With tricks and finesse all their projects defeating,
  • And laugh, in the end, at what people say.
  • Soon shall we see, then, who’ll victor be, then;
  • Bartolo—Figaro—I, sir, or you.
  • [Exit Bartolo.
Mar.

[Alone.] Things look fairer than ever; I yet hope to defeat them. But Susanna is coming. [Susanna appears behind, with a ribbon, robe and head-dress in her hands.] Now, then, to try her—pretend I don’t observe her. Ah! what a priceless treasure Figaro now will wed.

Sus.

Of me she’s speaking.

Edition: current; Page: [8]
Mar.

After all, he’s a barber, and what else could be hoped for?—“L’argent fait tout.”

Sus.

[Advancing.] The serpent! Really, madam, you grow worse than ever.

Mar.

Bravo! how mighty civil!—with that air so affected!—that assumption of virtue! In truth, Ma’am—

Sus.

Better to go.

Mar.

[Ironically.] What a nice wife!

Duetto.—Marcellina e Susanna.

Mar.
  • Via resti servita, madama brillante!
Sus.
  • Non sono si ardita—madama piccante.
Mar.
  • No; prima a lei tocca.
Sus.
  • No, no’ tocc’ a lei.
Mar.
  • Io so i dover miei;
Sus.
  • Non fo incivilità.
Mar.
  • La sposa novella!
Sus.
  • La dama d’onore!
Mar.
  • Del Conte la bella!
Sus.
  • Di Spagna l’amore!
Mar.
  • I meriti!
Sus.
  • L’abito!
Mar.
  • Il posto!
Sus.
  • L’eta!
Mar.
  • Per Bacco precipita.
  • Se ancor, se ancor resto quà—
Sus.
  • Sibilla decrepita,
  • Da rider mi fà.
Mar.
  • Via resti, &c.
Sus.
  • L’età, l’età, l’età!
  • Da rider, da rider mi fà.
  • [Marcellina parte.
  • Va là, vecchia pedante! dottoressa arrogante!
  • [Getta la vesta sul la seggiolone.

Entra Cherubino.

Che.

Susanetta, sei tu?

Sus.

Son io; cosa volete?

Che.

Ah, cor mio!—che accidente!

Sus.

Cor vostro! Cosa avvenne?

Che.

Il Conte ieri, perchè trovommi sol con Barbarina, il congedo mi diede; e se la Contessina, la mia bella comare, grazia non m’intercede, io vado via, io non ti vedo più, Susanna mia.

Sus.

Non vedete più me? Bravo! ma dunque non più, per la Contessa segretamente il vostro cor sospira?

[Cherubino sospira.

Che.

Cos’ hai lì? dimmi un poco.

Sus.

[Satiricamente.] Ah, il vago nastro e la notturna cuffia di comare si bella.

Che.

Deh, dammelo, Sorella; dammelo per pietà.

[Glielo strappa il nastro di mano.

Sus.

Presto quel nastro!

Che.

O caro!—O bello, O fortunato nastro! Io non tel rendero che colla vita!

Sus.

Cos’ è quest’ insolenza.

Che.

Eh, via! sta cheta, In ricompensa, poi, questa mia canzonetta io ti vò dare.

Sus.

E che ne debbo fare?

Che.

Leggila alla Padrona—leggila tu, medesma—leggila a Barbarina, a Marcellina—leggila ad ogni donna del palazzo.

Sus.

Povero Cherubino, siete voi pazzo?

Duet.—Marcellina and Susanna.

Mar.
  • Go first, I entreat you, Miss, model of beauty!
Sus.
  • Respect to the aged, Ma’am—I know my duty.
Mar.
  • No; first, if you please, Miss.
Sus.
  • I could not, indeed.
Mar.
  • I well know good manners;
Sus.
  • And pray you, proceed.
Mar.
  • Of maidens the fairest!
Sus.
  • Of old ones the rarest!
Mar.
  • His Lordship’s Susanna!
Sus.
  • So polished in manner!
Mar.
  • So lovely!
Sus.
  • So noble!
Mar.
  • So graceful!
Sus.
  • A form!
Mar.
  • I burst with vexation;
  • If here I longer should stay—
Sus.
  • My dearest old woman,
  • Don’t vex yourself, pray!
Mar.
  • Go first, &c.
Sus.
  • Ha, ha, ha! ha, ha!
  • Don’t vex yourself, vex yourself, pray.
  • [Exit Marcellina
  • Farewell, spiteful old pedant—arrogant old doctor.
  • [She throws the dress across the arm-chair.

Enter Cherubino.

Che.

Susanna, is it you?

Sus.

Yes, I; but what’s the matter?

Che.

Ah, Susanna!—how unlucky!

Sus.

Unlucky! What has happened?

Che.

His lordship found me alone this morning with our Barbarina, and dismissed me his service. Unless the gracious Countess, my beloved protectress, grants me her intercession, I’m lost for ever, and ne’er again shall see my own Susanna.

Sus.

You will see me no more? Bravo! then no more you burn, sir, for the Countess? You breathe no longer your sighs for her in secret?

[Cherubino sighs.

Che.

What hast there? pray, now, tell me.

Sus.

[Sarcastically.] Only the ribbon and cap that in the night time binds the head you respect so.

Che.

Ah, give it me, Susanna; in pity give it me.

[Snatching the ribbon from her.

Sus.

Restore the ribbon.

Che.

Dear ribbon!—oh lovely, oh happy, happy ribbon! ne’er will I give thee back; no, not for millions!

Sus.

Upon my word, you urchin!

Che.

Oh, be contented. In recompense, my dearest, I will give you this song of my composing.

Sus.

And how am I to use it?

Che.

Read it unto the Countess—read it yourself, Susanna—read it to every damsel in the palace.

Sus.

Poor Cherubino, you have lost your senses.

lf1398_figure_003.jpg
Edition: current; Page: [9]
lf1398_figure_004.jpg

NON SO PIU COSA SON—AH, WHAT FEELINGS. Air. Cherubino.

  • Parlo d’amor vegliando,
  • Parlo d’amor sognando,
  • All’ acqua, all’ ombra, ai monti,
  • Ai fiori, all’ erbe, ai fonti,
  • All’ acqua, all ombra,
  • Ai monti, ai fiora,
  • All’ eco—all’ aria—a venti,
  • Che il suon de vani accenti,
  • Portano via con se.
  • E se non ho chi m’oda.
  • Parlo d’amor con me.
Sus.

Taci! vien gente! [Cherubino si nasconde dietro il seggiolone.] Il Conte?—Oh! me meschina!

Entra il Conte Almaviva.

Il C.

Susanna! tu mi sembri agitata e confusa.

[Siede.

Sus.

Signor, io chiedo scusa. Ma se mai quì sorpresa—per carità, partite!

Il C.

Un momento, e ti lascio. Odi.

Sus.

Non odo nulla.

Il C.

Due parole. Tu sai che ambasciatore a Londra, il Re mi dichiarò, di condur meco Figaro destinai.

Sus.

Signor, se ossassi—

Il C.

Parla, parla, mia cara! E con quel dritto ch’oggi prendi su me, finche tu vivi, chiedi, imponi, presclivi.

Sus.

Lasciate mi, Signor; dritti non prendo, non me vò, non ne intendo. Oh me, infelice!

Il C.

Ah nò, Susanna, io ti vò far felice. Tu ben sai quanto io t’amo; a te Basilio tutti già disse. Or senti: se per pochi momenti, meco in giardin, sull’ imbrunir del giorno, ah per questo favore io pagherei.

Bas.

[Fuori.] E’ uscito poco fa.

Il C.

Chi parla?

Sus.

O, Dei!

Il C.

Esci; ed alcun non entri.

Sus.

Ch’io vi lasci quì solo.

[Turbata.

Bas.

[Fuori.] Da madama sarà, vado a cercarlo.

Il C.

Quì, dietro mi porro?

Sus.

Non vi celate.

Il C.

Taci—e cerca, ch’ei parta.

Sus.

Ohimè! che fate!

[Il Conte va a celarsi dietro il seggiolone, ma Susanna si pone destramente avanti di lui; e fa cenni a Cherubino il quale gira lestamente quasi carpone e si getta rannichiato nel seggiolone. Susanna lo copre colla vesta, che ha recata.

Entra Basilio.

Bas.

Susanna, il ciel vi salvi! Avreste a caso veduto il Conte?

Sus.

E cosa deve far meco il Conte?—animò, uscite.

Bas.

Aspettate; sentite! Figaro di lui cerca.

Sus.

Oh cielo! [Aparte.] Ei cercha chi, dopo voi, più l’odia.

Il C.

[Aparte, dietro il seggiolone.] Vediam come mi serve.

Bas.

Io non ho mai nella moral sentito, ch’uno ch’ami la moglie odii il marito. Per dir che il Conte v’ama!

Sus.

Sortite! vil ministro de l’altrui sfrenatezza, io non ho d’uopo della vostra morale, del Conte, del suo amor.

Bas.

Non c’è alcun male: ha ciascun i suoi gusti. Io mi crede a che preferir doveste per amante, come fan tutte quante un signor liberal, prudente, e saggio, a’ un giovinastro, a un paggio.

Sus.

A Cherubino?

Bas.

A Cherubino—Cherubin d’amore—ch’oggi sul far del giorno passeggiava quì intorno per entrar.

Sus.

Uom maligno, un impostura è questa.

Bas.

E un maligno con voi ch’ ha gli occhi in testa? E quella canzonetta!—ditemi in confidenza. [Confidente.] Io sono amico—ed altrui nulla dico. E per voi, per Madama?

Sus.

[Aparte.] Chi diavol gliel’ ha detto?

Bas.

A proposito, figlia, instruitelo meglio. Egli la guarda a tavola si spesso—e con tale immodestía, che s’il Conte s’accorge, e sul tal punto—sapete—egli è una bestia.

Sus.

Scellerato!—e perche andate voi tai menzogne spargendo?

Bas.

Io! che ingiustizia! quel che compro vendo! a quel che tutti dicono io non aggiungo un pelo.

[Il Conte si leva, turbato.

Il C.

[Avvanzandosi.] Come; che dicon tutti?

Bas.

[Aparte.] Oh bella!

Sus.

Oh Cielo!

  • Whatsoe’er I am doing,
  • Whatsoe’er I’m pursuing,
  • In sunshine or in showers,
  • At home, or midst the flowers,
  • In noontide bowers,
  • Midst April flowers,
  • I sigh—I pant—I languish,
  • In bliss that throbs like anguish,
  • Waking through night and day.
  • Alas! I die with pleasure,
  • Dreaming my life away.
Sus.

Silence! there’s some one. [Cherubino hides behind the chair.] His lordship?—Oh me, unlucky!

Enter Count Almaviva.

Count.

Susanna! whence this terror? why this sudden confusion? [Seats himself.

Sus.

[Agitated.] My lord, I pray excuse me. But suppose we are surprised now—for goodness’ sake away, away, sir.

Count.

But a moment, Susanna. Hear me.

Sus.

I’ve ears for nothing.

Count.

Don’t be silly. I’m made ambassador to London, by the royal grace, and intend taking Figaro thither with me.

Sus.

Might I presume, sir—

Count.

Surely, surely, my charmer! My greatest pleasure is to grant your requests, what form soever taking. Then speak them, my dearest!

Sus.

Pray leave me to myself; favor I ask not, nor have I claims upon you. Ah me, unhappy!

Count.

No, no, Susanna. I wish to make you happy. You well know how I love you; surely. Basilio of this has told you. Now, mark me: say you’ll meet me, my dearest, when day is o’er, within the orange bower, and your kindness shan’t go without reward.

Bas.

[Without.] He’s out, then?—never mind.

Count.

Who speaks there?

Edition: current; Page: [10]
Sus.

Oh, Heavens!

Count.

Quickly; give none admission.

Sus.

Shall I leave you alone, sir?

[Troubled.

Bas.

[Without.] With my lady, perhaps; there will I seek him.

Count.

Now, where to hide myself?

Sus.

Pray, no concealment.

Count.

Silence—and send him off quickly.

Sus.

Ah me! I’m ruined!

[The Count attempts to conceal himself behind the armchair, when Susanna interposes, and in the meanwhile Cherubino slips round and glides into it. Susanna then throws the dress over the latter.

Enter Basilio.

Bas.

Susanna, I salute you. Pray, have you met with my lord this morning?

Sus.

And what have I to do, then, with his lordship?—leave me, you booby.

Bas.

Yes, directly; but learn that Figaro seeks him also.

Sus.

Indeed, sir! [Aside.] He seeks his greatest foe, then, poor fellow.

Count.

[Aside, behind the chair.] I’ll see now how he serves me.

Bas.

There you are wrong; it follows not in logic that he who loves the wife is foe to the husband. And how his lordship loves you!

Sus.

Away, thou odious pander to the vice of another, for I despise you; preach your morals and logic to people like yourself.

Bas.

No anger, beauty; we’ve all our fancies. I took for granted that you’d your sex’s likings and impressions, and would prefer for lover one of birth, in the prime of life and manhood, to beardless pages and striplings.

Sus.

To Cherubino?

Bas.

Yes, Cherubino—cherubim of goodness—who was observed this morning slily lurking in the passage to this room.

Sus.

You malicious wretch! ’tis the grossest slander.

Bas.

Is’t slander, then, with you to use one’s senses? And then our page’s song, too. [Speaking in confidence.] Come, let me share the secret. You know my friendship—I would never reveal it. Was’t for you or the Countess?

Sus.

[Aside.] Who told him that, I wonder?

Bas.

Apropos of the Page, now; he is much too incautious. Often at table his looks betray his passion—understand, for the Countess. Should his lordship observe it—he’s suspicious—you know him—he’d play the devil.

Sus.

Wretched sland’rer!—tell me what delight you find in spreading such gross falsehood.

Bas.

Nay, what injustice! I but say as others; nor do I add a syllable to what is talked on all sides.

[The Count rises with a troubled look.

Count.

[Coming forward.] Well, sir; what’s talked on all sides?

Bas.

[Aside.] Delightful!

Sus.

Oh heavens!

Terzetto.—Conte, Susanna, e Basilio.

Il C.

Cosa sento?—Tosto, andate.

E scacciate il seduttor!

Bas.

[Aparte.] In qual punto son quì giunto.

Perdonate, O mio Signor.

Sus.

[Aparte.] Che ruina! me meschina!

Son oppressa dal dolor.

[Vacilla fingendo.

Il C.

Ah! già svien la Poverino!

Come, o Dio, le batte il cor.

[La sostengono.

Bas.

Pian, pianin su questo seggio.

[La vuol porre a sedere.

Sus.

[Lo rispinge con forza.]

Dove sono? Cosa veggio!

Che insolenza—andate fuor!

Bas. }

Siamo quì, per ajutarti,

Il C. }

E sicuro il vostro onor.

Bas.

Ah! del paggio quel che ho detto

Era solo un mio sospetto.

Sus.

E un’ insidia!—Una perfidia!

Non credete a l’impostor.

Il C.

Parta, parta, il damerino.

Sus. }

Poverino! poverino!

Bas. }
Il C.

[Ironico.] Poverino! poverino!

Ma da me sorpreso ancor—

Sus.

Come?

Bas.

Che?

Il C.

Da tua cugina,

L’uscio jer trovai rinchiuso;

Picchio, m’apre Barbarina

Paurosa fuor dell’ uso,

Io dal muso insospettito,

Guardo, cerco in ogni sito,

Ed alzando, plan, pianino

Il tappeto al tavolino,

Vedo il paggio.

[Alza, in imitazione, la vesta che copre il seggiolone, e scopre Cherubino.

Ah, cosa veggio!

Sus.

Ah, crude stelle!

Bas.

Ah, meglio ancora!

Il C.

Onestissima Signora!

Sus.

Accader non può di peggio.

Il C.

Or capisco come và.

Sus.

Giusti Dei, che mai sarà?

Bas.

Così fan tutte le belle,

Non c’è alcuna novità.

[Cherubino ch’ è fin quì rimaso rannichiato nel seggiolone, si leva su, quasi a sedere.

Il C.

Basilio, in traccia tosto di Figaro volate: Io vò che veda—

Sus.

Ed io che senta. Andate.

[Con sicurezza.

Il C.

[A Basilio.] Restate. [A Susanna.] Che badanza! e quale scusa, se la colpa è evidente?

Sus.

Non ha è uopo di scusa un’innocente.

Il C.

Ma costui quando venne?

Sus.

Egli era meco quando voi quì giungeste; e mi chiedea d’ impegnar la Padrona a interceder gli grazia, il vostro arrivo in scompiglio lo posse; ed allor in quel loco si nascose.

Il C.

Ma s’io stesso m’assisi, quando in camera entrai?

Che.

Ed allora di dietro io mi celai.

Il C.

E quando ic là mi posi?

Che.

Allor io pian mi volsi, e qui m’ascosi.

Il C.

Oh cielo! dunque hai sentito quello ch’io ti dicea.

Che.

Feci per non sentir, quanto potea.

Il C.

[A Susanna.] Oh! perfidia!

Bas.

[Arrestandolo.] Frenatevi;—vien gente.

Entra Figaro.

Il C.

[Prende per uno braccio Cherubino, e lo mette in piede.] E voi restate quì, picciol serpente.

  • Coro.

    • Giovani liete,
    • Fiori spargete,
    • Davanti al nobile,
    • Nostro Signor:
    • Il suo gran core
    • Vi serba intatto,
    • D’un più bel fiore
    • L’almo candor.
    • [A segno dal Conte, partono Coro, e Barbarina. Susanna, Cherubino, Basilio, Figaro e Il Conte, restano.
Fig. }
Sus. }

Evviva! evviva! evviva!

Bas. }
Fig.

[A Cherubino, che sta afflitto.] E voi non applaudite?

Sus.

E’afflitto, poveretto, perche il padron lo scaccia dal castello.

Fig.

[Al Conte.] Ah! in un giorno si bello?

Sus.

[Al Conte.] In un giorno di nozze?

Fig.

[Al Conte.] Quando ognuno v’ammira?

Che.

[S’ inginocchia.] Perdon, mio Signor.

Il C.

Nol meritate.

Sus.

Egli è ancora fanciullo.

Il C.

Men di quel che tu credi.

Che.

E ver mancai; ma dal mio labbro alfine—

Il C.

Ben, bene, io vi perdono; Anzi farò di più; vacante è un posto d’uffizial nel reggimento mio; io scelgo voi. Partite tosto, Addio.

Sus. }

Ah! fin domani sol.

Fig. }
Il C.

No; parta tosto.

Che.

A ubbidirvi, Signor, son già disposto.

Il C.

[Ironico a Cherubino.] Via, per l’ultima volta la Susanna abbracciate. [Aparte a Basilio.] Inaspettato è il colpo.

[Partono Il Conte e Basilio.

Fig.

[Interrompendo Cherubino, chi va per baciare Susanna.] Ehi, capitano; a me pure la mano. Io vo parlarti pria che tu parti. [Con gioia finta] Addio, picciolo Cherubino; come cangia in un punto il tuo destino!

Terzetto—Count, Susanna, and Basilio.

Count.

How! what hear I?—no delay, then!

Go and drive him, the rascal, hence!

No delay, then, but drive him quick from hence!

Bas.

[Aside.] Let Basilio mercy pray, then;

Youth excuses such light offence.

Sus.

[Aside.] What misfortune! how unlucky!

Surely we are at the worst.

[Pretends to be fainting

Edition: current; Page: [11]
Count.

Ah! poor girl, she’s really fainting;

Her bosom throbs as if ’twould burst.

[Supporting her.

Bas.

Gently, gently; sit you down there.

[Endcavoring to place her in a chair.

Sus.

[Repulsing them.]

Heav’ns! where am I? what presumption!

Have you dat’d—but hence, away!

Bas. }

Trust me, we are come to help you;

Count. }

Do, Susanna, be quiet, pray.

Bas.

What I hinted of the page here

Turns out nothing, I now engage, dear.

Sus.

Oh! insidious!—oh! man perfidious!

Don’t believe what he can say.

Count.

No, he goes; in vain you clamor.

Sus. }

Poor young fellow!

Bas. }
Count.

[Ironically.] Poor young fellow!

Yesterday, I caught the knave—

Sus.

How, then?

Bas.

How?

Count.

Why, at your cousin’s.

Yes; the door was locked and bolted.

Gently then I knock’d, when Barbarina

Most unwilling open’d.

This awak’d suspicion sleeping,—

All around me I go peeping,—

Then I gently raise the cover

From the table, and there discover—

[In saying this, he imitates the action described by lifting the dress from the arm-chair, when he discovers the Page.

Cherubino!

I’m all amazement!

Sus.

We’re lost for ever!

Bas.

Well, sure, I never!

Count.

So, my modest, chaste Signora!

Sus.

Everything to-day goes crossly.

Count.

Now I understand, my friend.

Sus.

Gracious pow’rs! how will it end!

Bas.

That is still the way with women,

Ever faithless, full of wiles.

[Cherubino, who has till now remained crouched in the chair, raises himself up, as if seated therein.

Count.

Basilio, now hasten; say to our Figaro I want him.

I’d have him witness—

Sus.

[With a confident air.] And so would I, too. Away, then.

Count.

[To Basilio.] Remain, sir. [To Susanna.] What excuse now? or what evasions, when the proofs are so pregnant?

Sus.

Oh, sir, innocence needs not an evasion.

Count.

But how, then, came he hither?

Sus.

Why, he was here already, ere you appeared, sir; and came to beg me to solicit my lady’s friendly intercession, when your approach confus’d and alarm’d him. In his terror he hid then where you found him.

Count.

I myself sate me down there when I enter’d the chamber.

Che.

Gliding quick from behind, I then conceal’d me.

Count.

And when I came round there, too?

Che.

I slipp’d back then unnotic’d, and hid again, sir.

Count.

You scanip! it seems, then, you listen’d to all that I was saying.

Che.

Really, I did my best, sir, not to listen.

Count.

[To Susanna.] Oh! you traitress.

Bas.

[Interrupting him.] Restrain yourself;—our bride groom.

Enter Figaro.

Count.

[Pushing Cherubino out of the chair, and seating him self.] Don’t dare to move a step, you little serpent

Edition: current; Page: [12]
  • Chorus.

    • Greet him with flowers,
    • Torn from May bowers,
    • Wet with the summer show’rs,
    • Children of Spring;
    • Freely he gives you
    • Blossoms much dearer,
    • Ev’ry heart nearer—
    • Dance, then, and sing.
    • [At a sign from the Count, Barbarina and the Chorus go off, while Susanna, Cherubino, Basilio, Figaro, and the Count remain.
Fig. }
Sus. }

Evviva! evviva! evviva!

Bas. }
Fig.

[To Cherubino, who looks sad.] And why don’t you applaud, sir?

Sus.

Poor fellow, he is grieving because his lordship bids him quit the castle.

Fig.

[To the Count.] How! on a morning like this, too?

Sus.

[To the Count.] On the morning of our wedding?

Fig.

[To the Count.] When all join in your praises?

Che.

[Kneeling.] Your pardon, good my lord.

Count.

You don’t deserve it.

Sus.

He is yet a mere stripling.

Count.

Not so young as you fancy.

Che.

I own my fault, sir,—pray hear my now protesting.

Count.

Well, well, you are forgiven. Nay, more than that I’ll do: a post is vacant in my own regiment—the post of ensign—’tis yours, my friend. Away, and quickly. Adieu.

Sus. }

Give till to-morrow, sir.

Fig. }
Count.

No; off directly.

Che.

To obey you, my lord, I’m ever ready.

Count.

[Ironically, to Cherubino.] Come—now, then, for the last time, embrace your dear Susanna. [Apart, to Basilio.] This blow was unexpected.

[Exeunt Count and Basilio.

Fig.

[Intercepting Cherubino, as he goes to kiss Susanna.] Hold, gallant captain; to me, now, pray address you. I wish to give a word of advice, sir. [With feigned joy.] Farewell, my excellent Cherubino; What a change a moment makes in all your fortunes!

lf1398_figure_005.jpg
Edition: current; Page: [13]
lf1398_figure_006.jpg

NON PIU ANDRAI—PLAY NO MORE. Air. Figaro.

SCENA II.—: Magnifica Camera con alcova da letto al fondo. Allato alt’ alcova, alla sinistra degli attori porta pratticabile di un gabinetto; dalla parte opposta fineetra pratticabile. A sinistra, alla quinta di mezzo, porta di entrata; dal lato opposto, all’ ultima quinta, porta di un gabinetto. Varie sedie.

SCENE II.—: A magnificent Chamber, with an alcove. At the side of the alcove, on the right hand, an outer door leading to a cabinet; on the left, a window; at the upper end, a door which leads to an inner chamber; on the opposite side, the door of a cabinet. Various seats.

Edition: current; Page: [14]
lf1398_figure_007.jpg

PORGI AMOR—LOVE, THOU HOLY. Air. Countess.

Entra Susanna.

La C.

[Siede.] Vieni, cara Susanna, finiscimi l’istoria.

Sus.

E già finita.

La C.

Dunque volle sedurti?

Sus.

O, il Signor Conte non fa tai complimenti colle donne mie pari; egli venne a contratto di danari.

La C.

Ah, il crudel più non m’ama!

Sus.

E come poi è geloso di voi?

La C.

Come lo sono i moderni mariti. Per sistema infedeli, per genio capricciosi, e per orgoglio, poi tutti gelosi. Ma se Figaro t’ama, ei sol pria.—

Entra Figaro, cantante.

Fig.

La, la, la, la, la, la!

Sus.

Eccolo. Vicni, amico—madama è impaziente.

Fig.

A voi non tocca, stare in pena per questo! Alfin di che si tratta? Al Signor Conte piace la sposa mia.

Sus.

Ed hai coraggio di trattar scherzando un negozio si serio?

Fig.

Non vi basta, che scherzando io ci pensi? Ecco il progetto. Per Basilio un biglietto io gli fo capitar, che l’ avvertisca di certo appuntamento, che per l’ora del ballo a un’ amante voi deste.

La C.

O ciel! che sento! ad un uom si geloso!

Fig.

Ancora meglio, cosi potrem più presto imbarazzarlo, confonderlo, imbrogliarlo, rovesciargli i progetti.

Sus.

E ver, ma in di lui vece s’ opporra Marcellina.

Fig.

Aspetta; al Conte farai subito dir, che verso sera attendati in giardino; il picciol Cherubino, per mio consiglio non ancor partito, da femmina vestito, faremo che in sua vece ivi sen vada. Questa è l’ unica strada, onde monsù, sorpreso da madama, sia costretto a far poi quel che si brama.

La C.

[A Susanna.] Che ti par?

Sus.

Non c’ è mal.

La C.

Nel nostro caso—

Sus.

Quand’ egli è persuaso—e dove è il tempo?

Fig.

Ito è il Conte alcaccia e per qualch ’ora non sarà di ritorno; io vado, e tosto Cherubino vi mando; lascio a voi la cura di vestirlo.

Sus.

E poi?

Fig.

E poi? [Cantante.]

Se vuol ballare, signor Contino,

Il chitarrino le suoneiò—

Si, le suonerò.

[Parte Figaro.

La C.

Quanto duolmi, Susanna, che questo giovinetto abbia del Conte le stravaganze udito! Ah! tu non sai—ma per quel causa mai da me stessa ei non venne? Dov’ è la canzonetta?

Sus.

Eccola appunto, facciam che si la canti. Zitto—vien gente—è desso!

Entra Cherubino.

Avanti, avanti, Signor uffiziale!

Che.

Ah! non chiamarmi con nome si fatale; ei mi rammenta, che abbandonar degg’ io comare tanto buona.

Sus.

E tanto bella?

Che.

[Contraffacendolo.] Ah! sì!—certo!

Sus.

[Contraffacendolo.] Ah! sì!—certo. Ipocritone! Via presio la canzone, che stamane a me deste—a madama cantate.

La C.

Chi n’ è l’autor?

Sus.

Guardate! egli ha due braccia di rossor sulla faccia!

La C.

Prendi la mia chitaria, e l’accompagna.

Che.

Io sono si tremante!—ma se Madama vuole—

Sus.

[Contraffacendolo.] Lo vuolesi!—lo vuol; manco parole.

Enter Susanna.

Countess.

[Seating herself] Hither, my good Susanna, and finish now your story.

Sus.

’Tis told already.

Countess.

He sought, then, to seduce you?

Sus.

Oh, no; his lordship would ne’er confer such favors on the lowly and simple: but he means to be present at our marriage.

Countess.

Ah, he loves me no longer!

Sus.

Then whence his jealousy, always on the watch?

Countess.

Your modern husbands all act in this fashion. They are on system faithless, changeful from disposition, while from their pride, child, they are no less jealous. But, if Figaro loves thee, by his assistance—

Enter Figaro, singing.

Fig.

La, la, la, la, la, la!

Sus.

Here he is. Now, my dearest—my lady’s impatient.

Fig.

There’s no occasion—no, not the least, my jewel! But let’s discuss the matter. His gracious lordship is pleas’d to love Susanna.

Sus.

And you’ve the courage to go on joking with a matter so serious?

Fig.

Never mind me; ’tis my nature to be joking. But mark my project: through Basil’, I sent my lord a letter, in which I gave him notice of a certain assignation made by you for the ball of this evening.

Countess.

Good Heavens! what madness!—to one who’s still so jealous!

Fig.

’Tis all the better; for thus we hope the sooner to confound him, embarrass him, and delude him.

Sus.

’Tis well; but in my lady’s stead send old Marcellina.

Fig.

Contented; so be it. Meanwhile, then, I’ll tell my lord that at nightfall you’ll meet him in the garden; and little Cherubino, my ready pupil, putting Edition: current; Page: [15] off his journey, and mask’d in female habit, shall in your place go thither, dearest Susanna. Trust me, there is no better way. Once surpris’d and caught in his misdoings, he’ll be glad to comply with all our wishes.

Countess.

[To Susanna.] What think you?

Sus.

Not amiss.

Countess.

Perplex’d as we are—

Sus.

If we can persuade him—the time for action?

Fig.

Why, the Count is gone hunting, and until nightfall will scarce think of returning. I’m off now, and quickly Cherubino will send you; for to you I leave it to disguise him.

Sus.

And what next?

Fig.

Why, then—[Singing.]

If you’re for dancing, trust me, good master,

I’ll to your prancing play up a tune—

Yes, play up a tune, sir—

[Exit Figaro.

Countess.

How it pains me, Susanna, to think that Cherubino should have o’erheard the Count thus himself exposing. I wonder wherefore our Page comes not to seek me; he’s full of youthful fancies. But where’s his canzonetta?

Sus.

Here it is; and, when he appears, I’ll make him sing it. Gently—a footstep—he’s coming!

Enter Cherubino.

Approach, approach now, most chivalrous commander!

Che.

Ah, never give me that title so detested; it still reminds me that I must needs abandon my dear and kind protectress.

Sus.

And one so lovely.

Che.

[Sighing.] Oh yes!—surely!

Sus.

[Mocking him.] Oh yes!—surely! Ah, you deluder! But now, sir, for the ballad which this morning you gave me—sing it, pray, to the Countess.

Countess.

Who wrote the song?

Sus.

Oh, look, now, my lady! only see how page-like he blushes!

Countess.

Take my guitar, and play to our minstrel’s singing.

Che.

I’m all in such a tremble!—but, if madam commands it—

Sus.

[Mocking him.] Poor little boy!—Oh yes, my lady wills it.

lf1398_figure_008.jpg
Edition: current; Page: [16]
lf1398_figure_009.jpg

VOI CHE SAPETE—WHAT IS THIS FEELING. Air. Cherubino.

Sus.

Presto a noi, bel soldato; Figaro v’informò—

Che.

Tutto mi disse.

Sus.

Lasciatemi veder. [Osservando Cherubino.] Siam d’eguale statura. Giù quel manto.

[Gli leva il manto.

La C.

Che fai?

Sus.

Niente paura!

La C.

E se qualcuno entrasse?

Sus.

Entri, che mal facciamo? La porta chiuderò. [Va a chiudere la porta.] Ma [Editor: illegible word] poi acconciargli i capelli?

La C.

Una mi cuffia prendi nel gabinetto—presto. [A Cherubino, come Susanna entra nel gabinetto.] Che carta è quella?

Che.

La patente—

La C.

Che sollecita gente!

Che.

L’ ebbi or da Basilio.

La C.

Della fietta obbliato hanno il sigillo.

[Rende la patente a Cherubino.

Sus.

[Con una cuffia.] Il sigillo di che?

La C.

Della patente.

Sus.

Cospetto! che premura! Ecco la cuffia!

La C.

Spicciati!—Va bene; miserabili noi, se il Conte viene.

[Susanna siede vicino alla Contessa; Cherubino se le inginocchia davanti, e Susanna gli mette la cuffia.

Sus.

Come you hither, my soldier; Figaro has told you—

Che.

Every thing, Susan.

Sus.

That’s well. Now let me see. [Standing back to back with Cherubino.] ’Twill do to a nicety. We are equal in stature. Doff your mantle.

[Takes off his cloak.

Countess.

What mean you?

Sus.

Oh, don’t be frightened.

Countess.

If any one should enter?

Sus.

Well, ma’am, what does it matter? I’ll fasten, though, the door. [Goes to shut the door.] But how to trim up our lady with ringlets?

Countess.

Why, you can take a head-dress of mine from yonder closet [To Cherubino, as Susanna goes to the cabinet.] What paper’s that, sir?

Che.

My commission—

Countess.

They’re in a marvellous hurry.

Che.

From Basitio, this moment—

Countess.

In their haste, too, they have quite forgot to seal it.

[Giving it back to him.

Sus.

[Re-entering.] Have forgot to seal what?

Countess.

Why, the commission.

Sus.

Cospetto!—But no matter. Here is the head-dress.

Countess.

Behold it!—be speedy; if the Count find him here, he’ll ne’er forgive us.

[Susanna takes a seat by the Countess; Cherubino kneels before her, and Susanna places the cap on his head.

Aria.—Susanna.

  • Venite, inginocehiatevi,
  • Restate fermo lì;
  • Pian, piano or via giratevi;
  • Bravo! va ben così.
  • La faecia ora volgetemi;
  • Olà! quegli occhi a me;
  • Drittissimo, guardatemi.
  • Madama quì non è.
  • Restate fermo lì.
  • Più alto quel colletto—
  • Quel ciglio un pò più basso;
  • Le mani sotto il petto,
  • Vediemo poscia il passo?
  • Quando sarete in piè;
  • Vedremo poscia il passo!
  • [Alla Conte.
  • Mirate il bricconcello,
  • Mirate quanto è bello!
  • Che furba guardatura!
  • Che vezzo, che figura!
  • Se l’amane le femmine,
  • Han certo il lor perchè.
La C.

Finiam le ragazzate; or quelle maniche oltre il gomito gli alza, onde più agitatamente l’abito gli si adatti.

Sus.

Ecco.

[Susanna eseguisce.

La C.

Più indietro così. Che nastro è quello?

[Cherubino lo ha legato al braccio.

Sus.

E quel ch’ esso involommi.

[Parte Susanna col manto di Cherubino.

Che.

Allorche un nastro legò la chioma, ovver toccò le pelle—d’ oggetto.

La C.

Son sola—Ah sì son sola.

[Si piechia fuori.

Il C.

[Di fuori.] Perchè chiusa?

La C.

Il mio sposo—[Si alzano agitati.] Oh Dei! Son morta! Voi quì senza mantello—in questo stato!—un ricevuto foglio—la sua gran gelosia!

Il C.

[Di fuori.] Cosa indugiate?

La C.

Son sola—Ah sì son sola.

Il C.

A chi parlate?

La C.

A voi certo, a voi stesso.

[Confusa.

Che.

Dopo quel ch’è successo—il suo furore! Non trovo altro consiglio.

[Corre a celarsi nel gabinetto.

La C.

Ah! mi defenda il cielo in tal periglio!

[Leva la chiave dal gabinetto, e corre ad aprire il Conte, che entra.

Il C.

Che novità? Non fu mai vostra uzanza di rinchiudervi in stanza.

La C.

E’ver! ma io—io stava quì mettendo—

Il C.

Via mettendo?

La C.

Certe robe. Era meco la Susanna—che in sua camera è andata.

Il C.

Ad ogni modo voi non siete tranquilla. [Esaminandola, e mostrandola una lettera da Figaro.] Guardate questo foglio.

La C.

Numi! è il foglio, che Figaro gli scrisse.

[Si fa rumore nel gabinetto don’ è Cherubino.

Il C.

Cos’ è cotesto strepito? In gabinetto qualche cosa e caduta.

La C.

[Più confusa.] Io non intesi niente.

Il C.

Convien che abbiate i gran pensieri in mente.

La C.

Di che?

Il C.

La v’e qualcuno.

La C.

Chi volete che sia?

Il C.

Lo chiedo a voi, io vengo in questo punto.

La C.

Ah si! Susanna appunto—

Il C.

Che passò, mi diceste, alla sua stanza.

La C.

Alla sua stanza, o quì—non vidi bene.

Il C.

Susanna?—e d’onde viene che siete si turbata?

La C.

Per la mia cameriera.

Il C.

Io non so nulla, ma turbata senz’ altro.

La C.

Ah, quella serva, più che non turba me, turba voi stesso.

Il C.

E’ vero, è vero. E la vedrete adesso.

Susanna esce dalla sua camera [Editor: illegible word] una vesta, ed ascolta indietre

Il C.
  • Susanna, or via sortite;
  • Sortite così vò.
La C.
  • Fermatevi—sentite!
  • Sortire ella non può.
Il C.

[Alla porta.] Dunque parlate almeno.

La C.

Non vo’, tacete.

Il C.

Dunque voi non aprite?

La C.

E perche deggio le mie camere aprir?

Il C.

Ebben Iasciate; l’aprirem senza chiavi. [Irritamente.] Ehi gente!

La C.

Come! porreste a repentaglio d’una dama l’onore.

Il C.

E vero; io sbaglio. Voi la condiscendenza di venir meco avrete—Madama, eccovi il braccio. Andiamo.

La C.

Andiamo.

Il C.

[Alzando la voce.] Susanna stara quì fin che torniamo.

[Partono—Susanna esce e va alla porta del gabinetto.

Aria.—Susanna.

  • Come hither, page, and kneel you down,
  • And look me in the face;
  • But keep you still—you’d better, sir,—
  • Bravo! he mends apace.
  • Once more I’d have you look at me;
  • Come, this way turn your head;
  • You little rogue, we’ll drive you hence,
  • Unless you mind what’s said.
  • Still, I advise you, sir—bravo!
  • Now let me view you nearer.
  • This cap shows off your graces;
  • But, when you move, remember
  • To moderate your paces.
  • Now rise and walk about;
  • The rogue looks so demurely.
  • [To the Countess
  • He’ll win each maiden surely,
  • His eyes so full of lustre!
  • Smile that never misses,
  • Edition: current; Page: [17]
  • And lips all made for kisses,—
  • So lovingly they pout.
Countess.

Complete his transformation. Tuck up his sleeves, now, above his elbows, I play you, so that the dress may sit upon him with grace and lightness.

Sus.

Yes, Ma’am.

[Susanna does as desired.

Countess.

A little higher. [Sees a ribbon round his arm.] What ribbon’s that, sir?

Sus.

The one he stole from me, sure.

[Susanna goes off with Cherubino’s mantle.

Che.

Oh, when a ribbon has bound the hair up, or only touch’d the skin of—of some one.

Countess.

This is folly; I request you’ll give over.

[A knocking.

Count.

[Without.] Why shut in thus?

Countess.

My husband! [They come forward, flurried.] Good heavens! I’m ruin’d—you here, stripp’d of your mantle—in such condition—that most unlucky letter—he so prone to suspicion.

Count.

[Knocking.] Why don’t you open?

Countess.

What is it? I’m by myself here.

Count.

You spoke to some one?

Countess.

To you, sir—only to yourself, sir.

[Affecting composure.

Che.

Oh, his rage will be dreadful—what’s to be done now? This way alone is left me.

[Cherubino runs to hide himself in the cabinet.

Countess.

Into what peril has my folly run me!

[Takes the key out of the cabinet, and goes to open the door to the Count.

Count.

[Entering.] What fancy’s this? you were not used till now, Ma’am, thus to lock yourself in here.

Countess.

’Tis true; but then I was busy, sir, arranging.

Count.

Arranging what?

Countess.

Certain dresses. And Susanna was assisting—she’s now gone to her chamber.

Count.

And yet it seems, Ma’am, you do not feel too easy. [Eyeing her keenly, and giving her Figaro’s letter.] I pray you read that letter.

Countess.

Heavens! the letter that Figaro would send him.

[Cherubino upsets a chair in the cabinet.

Count.

What noise is that in yonder room? I’m sure a table, chair, or something has fallen.

Countess.

[More confused] Fallen, sir?—I did not hear it.

Count.

You must be thinking most profoundly, Madam.

Countess.

Of what?

Count.

Him that is yonder.

Countess.

May I ask who it is, sir?

Count.

That you must answer, since I have just now entered.

Countess.

Oh yes; why not, sir?—Susanna—

Count.

Who, you told me, went this moment to her chamber.

Countess.

Yes, her own chamber, or that—I can’t be certain.

Count.

Susanna!—and why, then, seem you in such perturbation?

Countess.

’Tis for her I’m flurried.

Count.

I’m in the dark still. But ’tis plain you’re confounded.

Countess.

Truly, it seems that my maid disturbs you more than she does me, sir.

Count.

You’re right, precisely. And now this question to settle.

Enter Susanna, with a dress over her arm, who listens at the back of the stage, and observes what is passing.

Count.
  • Come forth, come forth, Susanna;
  • Come forth, I say again.
Edition: current; Page: [18]
Countess.
  • No, stay within—for shame, sir,—
  • You call for her in vain.
Count.

Then speak, at least.

[At the door

Countess.

I will not—hush!

Count.

Then, it seems, you won’t open?

Countess.

And wherefore should I do a thing so absurd?

Count.

I ask no longer; I can do without you. [Angrily.] Who waits there?

Countess.

How, sir? you will not surely take a freedom so indecorous?

Count.

You’re right, ma’am; I own it. Pray be so condescending as to come with me a moment; my arm is quite at your service. Let’s go, ma’am.

Countess.

Let’s go, sir.

Count.

[Raising his voice.] Susanna here will wait for our returning.

[Exeunt—Susanna goes to the door of the cabinet.

Duetto.—Susanna e Cherubino.

Sus.
  • Aprite, presto aprite,
  • A prite, è la Susanna;
  • Sortite, sortite, sortite,
  • Via sortite,
  • Andate via di quà.
Che.
  • Ahime! che scene orribile!
  • Che gran fatalità!
Sus.
  • Partite, non tardate!
  • Le porte son serrate.
Che. }
  • Le porte son serrate.
Sus. }
  • Che mar sarà.
Che.
  • Quì perdersi non giova.
Sus.
  • V’uccide, se vi trova.
Che.
  • M’uccide, se mi trova.
  • Veggiamo un po quì fuori!
  • [Andando alla finestra, pretendente di saltar giù.
  • Dà proprio nel giardino?
Sus.
  • Fermate, Cherubino;—
  • Fermate, fermate, per pietà!
Che.
  • Un vaso, o due, di fiori;
  • Più mal non avverrà.
Sus.
  • Tiopp’ alto per un salto;
  • Fermate per pietà.
Che.
  • Quì perdersi non giova.
Sus.
  • Fermate, Cherubino!
Che.
  • M’uccide, se mi trova!
Sus.
  • Troppo’ alto per un salto—
  • Fermate per pietà!
Che.
  • Lasciami.
  • Pria di nuocerti, nel fuoco volerei!
  • Abbraccio te per lei!
  • [Bacia Susanna.
  • Addio! Così si fa!
  • [Sorte dalla finestra e salta giù.
Sus.
  • Ei va a perire, O Dei!
  • Fermate, pietà!
  • Fermate, fermate!
Sus.

Oh! guarda il demonietto, come fugge! è già un miglio lontano Ma non perdiamei invano; entriam nel gabinetto; venga poi lo smargiasso; io quì l’aspetto.

[Entra nel gabinetto e ferma la porta.

Rientra il Conte chi porta in mano una leva. La Contessa l’accompagna.

Il C.

Tutto e come il lasciai; volete dunque aprir voi stessa, o deggio?

La C.

Ahimè! fermate, e ascoltatemi un poco; mi credete capace di mancar al dover?

Il C.

Come vi piace; entro quel gabinetto; che v’e chiuso vedrò!

La C.

Sì, lo vedrete, ma uditemi tranquillo.

Il C.

Non è dunque, Susanna?

La C.

E un fanciullo.

Il C.

Un fanciul?

La C.

Si: Cherubino.

Il C.

E mi farà il destino ritrovar questo paggio in ogni loco? Come—non è partito? scellerati—ecco i dubbj spiegati! ecco l’imbroglio—ecco il raggiro onde m’avverti il foglio.

Duet—Susanna and Cherubino.

Sus.
  • Be quick, dear Cherubino;
  • Quick, open; ’tis Susanna.
  • Now hasten, now hasten, now hasten.
  • ’Tis Susanna
  • Now haste away from here.
Che.
  • But where shall I betake myself?
  • I see no refuge near.
Sus.
  • You must not stop a minute.
  • [Trying the door.
  • How? lock’d; the deuce is in it.
Che. }
  • ’Tis lock’d? the deuce is in it
Sus. }
  • If affairs don’t mend, how will it end?
Che.
  • I’m in a pretty way now.
Sus.
  • He’ll kill you if he finds you.
Che.
  • I’ve no desire to stay now.
  • This comes of love’s devotion!
  • [Going to the window, and making signs, as if about to leap out.
  • How far off lies the garden?
Sus.
  • Oh, pray give up that notion;—
  • ’Tis twenty, full twenty feet below!
Che.
  • No matter; I defy it.
  • Take heart; for down I go.
Sus.
  • No, no; you must not try it;—
  • ’Tis twenty feet below.
Che.
  • Yet still I needs must try it.
Sus.
  • Oh, pray give up that notion.
Che.
  • There’s danger to delay it.
Sus.
  • More danger to essay it;—
  • ’Tis twenty feet below.
Che.
  • Let me go.
  • Do not doubt me; rest securely!
  • This kiss you’ll give my lady.
  • [Kisses Susanna.
  • Adieu! And now here goes.
  • [Gets out at the window, and drops below.
Sus.
  • He’ll break his neck full surely.
  • Was ever such a madcap!
  • Return, sir—return, sir.
Sus.

Oh, see the little devil, how he scampers! he’s a mile off already. Let us not waste the time, though. Within the room I’ll plant me. Come my lord when he pleases, there will I await him.

[Goes into the closet and shuts the door.

Re-enter the Count, carrying a crowbar, accompanied by the Countess.

Count.

All is just as I left it; now your decision—will you open or not, ma’am?

Countess.

Pray you forbear, sir, and attend for a moment, do you think I could ever to my duty be false?

Count.

Really, you poze me; but I must know, Signora, who is hid in yon room?

Countess.

Well, you shall know it; but hear me first with calmness.

Edition: current; Page: [19]
Count.

It is not, then, Susanna?

Countess.

’Tis a child, sir.

Count.

How? a child?

Countess.

Yes: Cherubino.

Count.

Zounds! is it, then, my fortune to be cross’d by the varlet every moment? So, so; he’s not departed? base deceiver—now the whole is explained, Ma’am; hence the confusion. This is the meeting hinted at in the letter.

Finale.—Il Conte e La Contessa.

Il C.
  • Esci ormai, garzon malnato!
  • Sciagurato, non tardar!
La C.
  • Ah! Signore! quel furore!
  • Per lui fammi il cor tremar!
Il C.
  • E d’ opporvi ancor osate?
La C.
  • No, sentite.
Il C.
  • Via, parlate.
La C.
  • Giuro al ciel ch’ ogni sospetto—
  • E lo stato, in che il trovate,
  • Sciolto il collo, nudo il petto.
Il C.
  • Sciolto il collo, nudo il petto—
  • Seguitate.
La C.
  • Per vestir feminee spoglie—
Il C.
  • Ah! comprendo, indegna moglie!
  • Mi vò tosto vendicar!
  • [Prende infuriato la leva.
La C.
  • Mi fa torto quel trasporto:
  • M’ oltraggiatea dubitar!
Il C.
  • Quà la chiave.
La C.
  • Egli è innocente.
  • Voi sapete—
Il C.
  • Non so niente.
  • Va lontan dagl’ occhi miei,
  • Un infida, un empia, sei—
  • E mi cerchi d’ infamar.
La C.
  • Vado, sì—ma—
Il C.
  • Non ascolto.
La C.
  • Ma—
Il C.
  • Non ascolto.
La C.
  • Non son rea!
Il C.
  • Vel leggo in volto.
  • Mora, mora!
  • [La Contessa gli dà la chiave.
La C.
  • Ah! la cieca gelosia,
  • Qualche eccesso gli fa far.
Il C.
  • Mora, mora, e più non sia
  • Ria cagion del mio penar!
  • Ah, comprendo!
  • [Il Conte apre la porta; la Contessa si getta affannosa soprit una sedia, coprendosi gli occhi.

Susanna esce dal gabinetto, con aria grave ed ironica.

Il C.
  • Susanna!
La C.
  • Susanna!
Sus.
  • Signore!—
  • Cos’ è quel stupore?
  • Il brando prendete?
  • Il paggio uccidete,
  • Quel paggio malnato,
  • Vedetelo quà?
Il C.
  • Che scuola!
La C.
  • Che storia é mai questa?
  • Susanna era là.
Sus.
  • Confusa han la testa,
  • Non san come và.
Il C.
  • La testa girando mi và.
Sus.
  • [Con ironia mostrando il gabinetto.]
  • Guardate, quì ascoso sara.
Il C.
  • Guardiamo—guardiamo,
  • Quì ascoso sarà.
  • [Il Conte entra nel qabinetto.
La C.
  • Susanna!—son morta!
  • Il fiato mi manca?
Sus.
  • Più lieta, più franca;
  • In salvo è di gia.
  • [Il Conte esce, confuso.
Il C.
  • [Aparte.] Che sbaglio mai presi!
  • Che sbaglio mai presi!—
  • Appena lo credo!
  • Se a torto v’ offesi,
  • Perdono vi chiedo,
  • [Alla Contessa.
  • Ma far burla simile
  • E poi crudeltà.
Sus. {
  • Le vostre follie
La C. {
  • Non mertan pietà.
Il C.
  • Io v’ amo.
La C.
  • Nol dite.
Il C.
  • Vel giuro!
La C.
  • Mentite.
  • Son l’ empia, l’ infida,
  • Che ognora v’ inganna.
Il C.
  • Quell’ ira, Susanna,
  • M’ aita a calmar.
Sus.
  • Così si condanna
  • Chi può sospettar.
La C.
  • Ah! dunque la fede
  • D’ un’ anima amante,
  • Si fiera mercede
  • Doveva sperar.
Sus.
  • Così si condanna
  • Chi può sospettar.
  • Signora!
Il C.
  • Rosina!
La C.
  • Crudele! più quella non sono:
  • Ma il misero oggetto
  • Del vostro abbandono,
  • Che avete diletto
  • Di far disperar.
  • Confuso, pentito,
  • [Piani, alla Contessa.
Sus. {
  • E troppo punito,
Il C. {
  • Son troppo punito,
  • Abbiate pietà.
La C.
  • Soffrir si gran torto
  • Quest’ alma non sa!
Il C.
  • Ma il paggio rinchiuso?
La C.
  • Fu sol per provarvi.
Il C.
  • Ma i tremiti, i palpiti?
La C.
  • Fu sol per burlarvi?
Il C.
  • Ma un foglio si barbaro?
  • [Mostra la lettera.
Sus. {
  • Di Figaro è il foglio,
La C. {
  • E a voi per Basilio.
Il C.
  • Ah, perfidi! io voglio.—
Sus. {
  • Perdono non merta chi agli altri non dà;
La C. {
  • Perdono non merta chi agli altri non dà.
Il C.
  • Ebben, se vi piace.
  • Commune è la pace.
  • Rosina inflessibile con me non sarà.
La C.
  • Ah! quanto, Susanna,
  • Son dolce di core!
  • [Da la mano al Conte.
  • Di donne al furore
  • Chi più crederà!
Sus.
  • Cogl’ uomin, Signora,
  • Girate, volgete;
  • Vedrete, che ognora
  • Cade poi là.
Il C.
  • Guardatemi!
La C.
  • Ingrato!
Il C.
  • Guardatemi!
  • Ho torto, e mi pento.
Sus. {
  • Da questo momento,
La C. {
  • Quest’ alma a conoscerla,
Il C. {
  • Apprender potrà.

Entra Figaro.

Fig.
  • Signore, di fuori,
  • Son già i suonatori;
  • Le trombe sentite,
  • I pifferi udite;
  • Tra canti, tra balli,
  • De’ vostri vassalli.
  • Corriamo, voliamo,
  • Le nozze a compir.
  • [Partendo, il Conte lo ferma.
Il C.
  • Pian, piano—men fretta!
Fig.
  • La turba m’ aspetta!
Il C.
  • Piano, piano—men fretta!
  • Un dubbio toglietemi
  • In pria di partir.
Sus. {
  • La cosa è scabrosa,
La C. {
  • Com’ ha finir?
Fig. {
Il C.
  • Con arte le carte
  • Convien quì scoprir.
  • Conoscete, Signor Figaro.
  • Questo foglio, chi vergò?
  • [Mostra la lettera a Figaro.
Fig.
  • Nol conosco
Sus.
  • Nol conosci?
Fig.
  • No.
Sus. e {
  • Nol conosci?
La C. {
Fig.
  • No, no, no!
Sus.
  • E nol desti a Don Basilio?
La C.
  • Per recarlo?
Il C.
  • Tu c’intendi?
Fig.
  • Oibò! oibò!
Sus.
  • E nol sai del damerino—
La C.
  • Che sta sera nel giardino—
Il C.
  • Già capisci.
Fig.
  • Io non lo so.
Il C.
  • Cerci invan difesa e scusa.
  • Il tuo ceffo già t’ accusa,
  • Vedo ben, che vuol mentir.
Fig.
  • Mente il ceffo, io già non mento.
Sus. {
  • Il talento aguzzi in vano,
La C. {
  • Palesato abbiam l’ arcano,
  • No v’è nulla da ridir.
Il C.
  • Che rispondi?—
Fig.
  • Niente, niente.
Il C.
  • Dunque accordi?
Fig.
  • Non accordo.
Sus. {
  • Eh, via, chetati, balordo,
La C. {
  • La burletta ha da finir.
Fig.
  • Per finerla lietamente,
  • E all’usanza teatrale,
  • Un azion matrimoniale
  • Le faremo ora seguir.
Sus. Fig. {
  • Deh, Signor, nol contrastatte,
La C. {
  • Consolate i miei desir!
Il C.
  • Marcellina! Marcellina!
  • Quanto tardi a comparir?

Viene Antonio mezzo ubbriaco, portando un vaso di viole, co' gambi schiacciati.

Ant.

Ah, Signor!

Il C.

Cosa è stato?

Ant.

Che insolenza? Chi il fece? chi fu?

Sus. La C. {

Cosa dici? cos’ hai? cosa è nato?

Il C. & Fig. {
Ant.

Ascoltate!

Sus. La C. {

Via parla, di su.

Il C. e Fig. {
Ant.
  • Dal balcone, che guarda in giardino,
  • Mille cose ogni d’ gettar veggio,
  • E poc’ anzi può darsi di peggio,
  • Vidi un uom, Signor mio! gettar giù
Il C.

Dal balcone!

Ant.

Vedete i garofani.

Il C.

In giardino?

Ant.

Sì!

La C. {

[A Figaro.] Figaro all’ erta.

Sus. {
Ant.

Cosa sento?

Sus. {

Costui ci sconcerta!

La C.

Quel briaco che venne a far quì?

Fig. {
Il C.

[Non osservandogli.]

Dunque un uom, ma dov’ è?

Dov’ è gito?

[Ad Antonio.

Ant.

Ratto, ratto il birbone è fuggito,

E ad un tratto di vista m’uscì.

Sus.

[Pian a Figaro.] Sai? che il paggio.

Fig.

So tutto, lo vidi.

Ah, ah, ah, ah!

[Ridendo.

Il C.

Taci là?

Ant.

[A Figaro.] Cosa ridi?

Fig.

[Ad Antonio.] Tu sei cotto dal sorger del dì.

Il C.

[Ad Antonio.] Or ripetimi, ripetimi,

Un uom dal balcone?

Ant.

Dal balcone.

Il C.

In giardino?

Ant.

In giardino.

Sus. La C. {

Ma, Signore, se in lui parla in vino?

e Fig. {
Il C.

[Senza fare attenzione a loro.]

Segui pure, segui pure?

Nè il volto il vedesti!

Ant.

No, nol vidi.

Sus. e La C.

Ola! Figaro, ascolta! Figaro, ascolta!

Il C.

Si?

Ant.

Nol vidi.

Fig.

[Ad Antonio.] Via piagnone stà zitto una volta!

Per tre soldi far tanto tumulto!

[Accennando i fiori.

Giacchè il fatto non può star occulto

Sono io stesso saltato di lì.

Il C.

Chi? voi stesso?

Fig.

Che stupor?

Sus. e La C.

Che testa! che ingegno!

Il C.

Già creder nol posso.

Ant.

Come mai diventaste si grosso?

Il C.

Già creder nol posso, nol posso.

Ant.

Dopo il salto non foste così.

Fig.

A chi salta succedi così.

Ant.

Chi il direbbe!

Sus. e La C.

Ed insiste quel pazzo?

Il C.

Tu che dici?

Ant.

E a me parve il ragazzo.

Il C.

Cherubin?

Sus. e La C.

Maledetto! maledetto!

Fig.

[Ironico.] Esso appunto, esso appunto,

Da Siviglia a cavallo quì giunto;

Da Siviglia or ei forse sarà.

Ant.

Questo no, questo no, che il cavallo

Io non vidi saltare di là.

Il C.

Che pazienza!

La C. e Sus.

Come mai!

Il C.

Finiam questo ballo!

La C. e Sus.

Giusto ciel finirà?

Il C.

[A Figaro.] Dunque tu?

Fig.

Saltai giù?

Il C.

Ma perchè?

Fig.

Il timor.

Il C.

Che timor?

Fig.

Là rinchiuso, [Mostrando il gabinetto.] aspettando quel caro visetto, tippe tappe un sussuro fuor d’ uso; voi gridaste—lo scritto biglietto, saltai giù, dal terrore confuso; e stravolto m’ ho un nervo del pie.

[Fregandosi il piede.

Ant.

[Cava fuori delle carte, e le mostra a Figaro.] Vostre dunque saran queste carte, che perdeste?

Il C.

[Strappandole gliele da.] Olà! porgile a me.

Fig.

[Aparte.] Sono in trappola, sono in trappola.

Sus. e La C.

Figaro al’erta!

Il C.

Dite un pò, questo foglio cos’ è?

[Mostrando glielo da lontano.

Fig.

Tosto, tosto, ne ho tanti, aspettate!

[Cava di tasca molta carte, e le esamina.

Ant.

Sarà forse il sommario dei debiti?

Fig.

No! la lista degl’ osti.

Il C.

Parlate; [Ad Antonio.] e tu lascialo!

Sus. e La C.

Lasciami, e parti!

Fig.

Lascialo e parti!

Ant.

Parto sì, ma se torno a trovarti!

Fig.

Vanne, vanne, non temo di te.

[Antonio parte; il Conte mostro ancora il foglio, e la Contessa vede ch’ e la patente.

Il C.

[Ad Figaro.] Dunque? [Ironico.] Coraggio!

[La Contessa guarda sopra le spalle del Conte.

La C.

[Pian a Susanna.] O, ciel! la patente del paggio.

Sus.

[Aparte a Figaro.] Giusti Dei! la patente!

Fig.

Ah, che testa! ah, che testa! Questa è la patente che poc’ anzi il fanciullo mi diè.

Il C.

Perchè fare?

Fig.

Vi manca—

Il C.

Vi manca?

La C.

[A Figaro.] Il suggello.

Sus.

Il suggello.

Il C.

[A Figaro.] Rispondi!

Fig.

E l’ usanza.

Il C.

Su via, li confondi!

Fig.

E l’ usanza di porvi il suggello.

Il C.

Questo birbo mi toglie il cervello.

Sus. {

[Aparte.] Le mi salvo da questo tempesta,

La C. {

Più non avvi naufragic per me.

Il C.

Tutto, tutto è un mistere per me.

[Gualcisce li foglio.

Fig.

Sbuffa invano, è la terra calpesta!

Poverino! ne sa men di me.

Entrano Marcellina, Basilio, e Bartolo.

Mar. Bas. {

Voi, Signor! che giusto siete,

Bar. {

Ci dovete ora ascoltar.

Il C.

[Aparte.] Son venuti a vendicarmi,

Ed io mi sento a consolar.

Sus. {

[Aparte.] Son venuti a sconcertarmi,

Il C. {

Qual rimedio ritrovar.

Fig.
  • Son venuti a sconcertarmi,
  • Qual rimedio ritrovar.
  • Son tre stolidi, tre pazzi!
  • Cosa mai vengono a far?
Il C.
  • Pian pìanin, senza schiamazzi
  • Dica ognun quel che gli par.
Mar.
  • Un impegno nuziale
  • [Al il Conte, parlando di Figaro.
  • Ha costui con me contratto,
  • E pretendo che il contratto
  • Deva meco effetuar.
Sus. Fig. }
  • Come! come!
La C. }
Il C.
  • Ola! silenzio, silenzio!
  • Io son quì per giudicar.
Bas.
  • Io com’ nom al mondo cognito,
  • Vengo quì per testimonio
  • Dal promesso matrimonio,
  • Con prestanza di danar.
Sus. }
La C. }
  • Son tre matti.
Fig. }
Count.
  • Ola! silenzio, vedremo.
  • Il contratto leggeremo,
  • Tutto in ordin deve andar.
Sus. }
La C. }
  • Son confusa,
Fig. }
  • Son stordita.
Mar. Bas. Il C. e Bar.
  • Che bel colpo, che bel caso!
Sus. La C. e Fig.
  • Disperata, sbalordita.
Mar. Bas. Il C. e Bar.
  • E cresciuto a tutti il naso.
Sus. }
La C. }
  • Certo un diavol dell’ inferno
Fig. }
  • Quì li ha fatti capitar.
Mar. }
Bas. }
  • Qualche nume, a noi propizio,
Count. }
  • Quì cì ha fatti capitar.
Bar. }
fine dell’ atto primo.

Finale.—Count and Countess.

Count.
  • Come, come out, you little villain!
  • Forth, this instant, you had best.
Countess.
  • What a tumult all for nothing!
  • Spare him, pray, at my request!
Count.
  • Dare you make such intercession?
Countess.
  • But a word, sir.
Count.
  • Well, let’s hear it.
Countess.
  • He is free from all transgression;
  • Though, I own it, his strange condition
  • Well might waken your suspicion.
Count.
  • His condition wakes suspicion!
  • Pray you finish.
Countess.
  • In a woman’s garment dressing—
Count.
  • Oh, my rage is past expressing!
  • But on him I’ll vengeance take.
  • [Seizes the crowbar in a rage
Countess.
  • Oh, you wrong me by this fury:
  • Yes, indeed, my heart will break.
Count.
  • Quick; the keys here.
Countess.
  • Spare him; he’s guiltless.
  • Ah, you know, sir—
Count.
  • I know nothing.
  • Hence: away, away for ever;
  • From this moment we must sever—
  • Pray’rs and tears alike are vain.
Countess.
  • Well, sir, but think—
Count.
  • I’m deaf, Ma’am.
Countess.
  • But—
Count.
  • I will not hear thee.
Countess.
  • Only two words!
Count.
  • Words cannot clear thee,—
  • Yes, he dies!
  • [The Countess gives him the key
Countess.
  • Vain it is that I would brave him;
  • Vain are all my pray’rs and sighs.
Count.
  • Yes, he dies; there’s nought can save him.
  • ’Tis in vain my wrath he flies!
  • Ah! I know all!
  • [The Count forces the door; the Countess in tears flings herself upon the sofa.

Susanna enters from the Cabinet, with a look of ironica gravity.

Count.
  • Susanna!
Countess.
  • Susanna!
Sus.
  • Yes, Signor!—
  • Is that so astounding?
  • Is that so confounding?
  • But, if that you will, sir,
  • Poor pages to kill, sir,
  • What say you to me?
Count.
  • How cunning!
Countess.
  • What means this contrivance?
  • Susanna!—she here?
Sus.
  • They’re puzzled, beilder’d—
  • The thing is quite clear.
Count.
  • I’m puzzled, outwitted, I fear.
Sus.
  • [Ironically pointing to the cabinet.]
  • Examine—perhaps there he lies!
Count.
  • I’ll do it—I’ll do it,
  • Since thus you advise.
  • [The Count goes into the cabinet
Edition: current; Page: [20]
Countess.
  • Susanna!—I’m ruin’d!
  • What fiction to use now?
Sus.
  • Be bolder—no terror—
  • He’s off now, the Page.
  • [The Count returns, confused.
Count.
  • [Aside.] How strange is my error!
  • I cannot conceive it—
  • I scarce can believe it!
  • But, if I’ve offended,
  • It ne’er was intended;
  • [To the Countess.
  • Such jokes, though, may justify
  • Suspicion and rage.
Sus. {
  • Your conduct indeed, sir, deserves all you’ve met;
Countess. {
  • Your rudeness and passion Ishe ne’er can forget.
Count.
  • I love you.
Countess.
  • You mock me.
  • Just now you protested,
  • My sight you detested.
Count.
  • Susanna, pray aid me;
  • My wit is too slight.
Sus.
  • Oh no; for my lady
  • Is all in the right.
Count.
  • ’Tis thus I’m rewarded
  • For all my devotion,
  • With constant commotion
  • From morning till night.
Sus.
  • For once, though, my lady
  • Is all in the right.
  • Pray, Madame!
Count.
  • Rosina!
Countess.
  • Ah, cruel! don’t call me Rosina:
  • That name is the token
  • Of vows that are broken,
  • Of love and affection
  • That long since are dead.
  • Ah, cruel! I once was perfection;
  • But those days are fled!
  • Repentant sincerely,
Sus. {
  • You use himme severely;
  • [Persuasively to Countess.
Count. {
  • Forgive him,me, I pray.
Count.
  • Your tales of that urchin?
Countess.
  • Were fictions to vex you.
Count.
  • Your tremors so manifest?
Countess.
  • Assum’d to perplex you.
Count.
  • That letter so horrible?
  • [Pointing to the letter.
Sus. {
  • By Figaro invented,
Countess. {
  • Through Basil’ then presented.
Count.
  • The scoundrels! I’ll requite them.
Sus.
  • He merits not pardon who cannot forgive;
Countess.
  • The proverb holds good here, to live and let live.
Count.
  • To all who’ve offended
  • Be grace then extended;
  • Rosina no longer is resentful, I hope.
Countess.
  • Ah! gentle Susanna,
  • How feeble our sex is!
  • [Gives her hand to the Count.
  • When most anger vexes,
  • How prone to give way!
Sus.
  • If man’s the offender,
  • In vain we resist, Ma’am;
  • He coaxes, persists, Ma’am,
  • And gains the day.
Count.
  • Forgive me, dear!
Countess.
  • Ungrateful!
Edition: current; Page: [21]
Count.
  • I’m wrong, I fear;
  • But, then, I do repent me.
Sus. & {
  • I’m glad, sir, to hear it,
Countess. {
  • Though still much I fear it,
  • Yet hope for the best.
Count.
  • I pray you believe me,
  • I would not deceive thee,
  • And hope for the best.

Enter Figaro.

Fig.
  • So please you, they come, sir.
  • With horn and with drum, sir;
  • The trumpets are screeching,
  • The little fifes squeaking,
  • With dances and singing,
  • And bells gladly ringing.
  • Proceed, sir, with speed, sir,
  • The marriage to bind
  • [As he is departing, the Count stops him
Count.
  • Piano—less prating.
Fig.
  • The people are waiting!
Count.
  • Before we set out, though,
  • Resolve me this doubt, do,
  • Which comes to my mind—
Sus. {
  • Oh, this is a poser,—
Countess. {
  • We’ve match’d him at last!
Fig. {
Count.
  • Oh yes, ’tis a closer,—
  • They’ve got me now fast!
  • Pray you tell me, Signor Figaro,
  • This same letter do you know?
  • [Showing a letter to Figaro.
Fig.
  • No; not I, sir.
Sus.
  • That’s a lie, sir.
Fig.
  • No!
Sus. & {
  • Own it—fie, sir!
Countess. {
Fig.
  • No—no—no!
Sus.
  • But you gave it to Basilio?
Countess.
  • To deliver?
Count.
  • Can’t you answer?
Fig.
  • I scarcely know.
Sus.
  • Sure, we’ve heard an assignation—
Countess.
  • For this evening is intended?
Count.
  • Comprehended?
Fig.
  • ’Pon honor, nay.
Count.
  • ’Tis in vain that you denied it;
  • Spite of all your tricks to hide it,
  • Blushes still the truth betray.
Fig.
  • Looks may lie, but I speak truly.
Sus. {
  • What’s the use of riddles weaving,
Countess. {
  • Not a soul of us deceiving;
  • Pray give up your idle jest.
Count.
  • Do you own it?
Fig.
  • Not at all, sir.
Count.
  • They accuse thee.
Fig.
  • Pray excuse me.
Sus. {
  • Nay, but now give o’er joking,
Countess. {
  • For the thing grows too provoking;
  • End the farce, the curtain fall.
Fig.
  • But, to make an end dramatic,
  • After these our ways erratic,
  • ’Tis a custom most emphatic,
  • Marriage now should wind up all.
Sus. Fig. {
  • Laying now aside your anger,
Countess. {
  • To our wishes yield, I pray.
Count.
  • [Aside.] Marcellina! Marcellina!
  • What so long can make her stay?

Antonio enters, intoxicated, carrying in his hand a flowerpot of violets, with their stems broken.

Ant.

Oh, my lord!

Edition: current; Page: [22]
Count.

What’s the matter?

Ant.

Who has done it? That’s what I would know.

Sus. Countess, {

What’s the meaning, forsooth, of this clatter?

Count, & Fig. {
Ant.

Give attention!

Sus. Countess, {

But don’t be so slow.

Count, & Fig. {
Ant.
  • From that window, upon all my flowers.
  • They are flinging, still, rubbish in showers;
  • But just now, which I take more unkindly,
  • They have thrown down upon me a man.
Count.

From that window?

Ant.

Yes. Only see these gilliflowers.

Count.

In the garden?

Ant.

Yes.

Sus. {

[To Figaro.] Be on your guard now.

Countess. {
Ant.

What have I done?

Sus. {

He’s sure to detect him.

Countess. {

But this drunkard—what does he want here?

Fig. {
Count.

[Not noticing them.]

But, if this be true,

Where has he got to?

[To Antonio.

Ant.

Oh, in double quick time he ran off, sir—

In the twinkling of an eye he was gone.

Sus.

[Aside to Figaro.] ’Twas our page, then?

Fig.

I know it—I saw him!

Ha, ha, ha, ha!

[Laughing.

Count.

Quiet, there!

Ant.

[To Figaro.] What! you saw him?

Fig.

[To Antonio.] Hold your tongue, sir, for once, if you’re wise.

You are drunk, and know not what you say.

Count.

[To Antonio.] Just repeat to me your tale once more.

He leap’d from the window?

Ant.

From the window.

Count.

On your flowers?

Ant.

On my flowers.

Sus. Fig. & {

’Tis the wine that speaks out of the fellow.

Countess. {
Count.

[Not attending to them.]

Tell us further, did you know him?

Let’s have no concealing!

Ant.

No,—oh, no, sir.

Sus. & Countess.

Now, then, mind and be careful.

Count.

Yes!

Ant.

Oh, no, sir.

Fig.

[To Antonio.] Was there ever, now, seen such a booby?

[Pointing to the flowers.

I’ll be honest, the truth now revealing.

’Twas myself that you saw leaping down.

Count.

How! yourself, man?

Fig.

Yes; why not?

Sus. & Countess.

How clever! what quickness!

Count.

I cannot believe it: ’tis fiction.

Ant.

You’d a different look when you jump’d.

Count.

I cannot believe it.

Ant.

You have grown since you leaped, then, much taller

Fig.

Yes: when jumping, I make myself small.

Ant.

Well! I never!

Sus. & Countess.

Why, you surely are frantic?

Count.

Now, what say you?

Ant.

Why, he seem’d but a boy, sir.

Count.

Was’t the Page?

Sus. & Countess.

What a question! how unlucky!

Fig.

[Ironically.] Yes, in sooth, sir,

That’s the truth, sir.

He from Seville’s return’d here on horseback;

At a galop, no doubt, he has come.

Edition: current; Page: [23]
Ant.

No, not so, sir; you’re wrong altogether:

They flung from the window no horse.

Count.

Too absurd, sir.

Countess & Sus.

We are lost!

Count.

I’m tired of these follies.

Countess & Sus.

Heavens! how will it end?

Count.

[To Figaro.] Then, ’twas you—

Fig.

Took the leap.

Count.

And for why?

Fig.

’Twas through fear.

Count.

Why through fear?

Fig.

I was hidden there, [Pointing to the Chamber,] awaiting till she was alone, sir, when tip, tap, tip, I heard voices murmuring; you call’d out then—and, dreading your anger, down I leap’d, all confounded by terror; in the tumble I sprain’d, too, my foot.

[Pretending to rub his ankle.

Ant.

[Showing to Figaro a folded paper.] I suppose, then, these papers have fallen from your pocket?

Count.

[Snatching them.] Indeed! give them to me.

Fig.

[Aside.] I am caught at last—I am caught at last.

Sus. & Countess.

Figaro, caution.

Count.

Now explain. What’s contain’d in this note?

[Showing it to him, at a distance.

Fig.

I’ve so many that really I am puzzled.

[Figaro takes several papers from his pocket, and pretends to seek what is wanted.

Ant.

Oh, perhaps ’tis the list of your creditors.

Fig.

No! the names of our guests, sir.

Count.

Speak out, then. [To Antonio.] Don’t you worry him.

Sus. & Countess.

Yes, be off, old babbler.

Ant.

Well, I go; but if once more I catch you—

Fig.

Yes, be off; you cannot frighten me.

[Antonio goes; the Count again shows the paper, and the Countess sees that it is the commission.

Count.

[To Figaro.] Well, sir? [Ironically.] Take courage!

[The Countess looks over the Count’s shoulder.

Countess.

[Aside to Susanna.] Oh, heavens! the page’s commission!

Sus.

[Aside to Figaro.] All ye saints, the commission!

Fig.

How forgetful! what a memory! Why, ’tis the commission which at parting he left, sir, with me.

Count.

What the object?

Fig.

It wanted—

Count.

It wanted?

Countess.

[Prompting him.] Sealing—sealing.

Sus.

Sealing.

Count.

[To Figaro.] Reply, sir.

Fig.

’Tis the custom—

Count.

Why this hesitation?

Fig.

Such commissions are seal’d when transacted.

Count.

Oh, this rascal will send me distracted.

Sus. {

[Aside.] If this tempest I safely should weather,

Countess. {

I will never again trust the sea.

Count.

All remains still a riddle for me.

[Twisting and rumpling the paper.

Fig.

You may rave, and may pull at your tether,

But still you are no match, sir, for me.

Enter Marcellina, Basilio, and Bartolo.

Mar. Bas. {

Gracious Lord, and noble master,

Bar. {

At your hands we justice pray.

Count.

[Aside.] They are come now all our plots to baffle Scarcely know I what to say.

Sus. Fig. }

[Aside.] They are come our plots to baffle;

Countess }

I am puzzled what to say.

Edition: current; Page: [24]
Fig.
  • You are three egregious boobies;—
  • What the plague do you want here?
Count.
  • Gently, gently, I command you;—
  • Let them make their purpose clear.
Mar.
  • [To the Count, speaking of Figaro.] Noble Count I ask for justice—
  • ’Gainst this traitor who has broken
  • Here to-day the marriage token,
  • Which before he gave to me.
Sus. Fig. }
  • What’s this? what’s this?
Countess. }
Count.
  • Ho la! Be silent!—attention—attention!
  • I am here to judge the case.
Bas.
  • I have come, my Lord, to offer
  • In this case my testimonial
  • Of a promise matrimonial,
  • By defendant made to her.
Sus. }
  • ’Tis too bad, sir;
Countess. }
  • They are mad, sir,—
Fig. }
  • Very mad, sir.
Count.
  • Still!—let me read the contract over;
  • Then the truth I shall discover;
  • I’ll be just to one and all.
Sus. }
Countess. }
  • I’m astounded!
Fig. }
  • I’m confounded!
Mar. Bas. Count & Bar.
  • What a lucky hit is this now?
Sus. Countess, & Fig.
  • Desperate, I fear, our case is.
Mar. Bas. Count, & Bar.
  • How it lengthens all their faces!
Sus. }
Countess. }
  • Sure some devil cross and vicious
Fig. }
  • Does his best to ruin all.
Mar. }
Bas. }
  • Sure some genius, most propitious,
Count. }
  • Comes to help us at our call.
Bar. }
end of the first act.

ATTO II

ACT II.

SCENA I.—: Gabinetto.—Il Conte, che passeggia turbato, e riflessivoSusanna in fondo.

Il C.

[Vede Susanna.] E Susanna! Chi sa ch’ ella tradito abbia il segreto mio; oh se ha parlato, gli fo sposar la vecchia. [A Susanna.] Cosa bramate!

Sus.

Mi par che siete in collera.

Il C.

Volets qualche cosa?

Sus.

Signor, la vostra sposa ha i soliti vapori e vi chiede il vasetto degli odori.

Il C.

Prendete.

Sus.

Or vel riporto.

Il C.

Ah, no: potete ritenerlo per voi.

Sus.

Per me? Questi non son mali da donne triviali.

Il C.

[Ironico.] Un amante che perdi il cara sposo sul punto d’ ottenerlo—

Sus.

Pagando Marcellina colla dote che voi mi promettesti—

Il C.

Ch’io vi promisi! quando?

Sus.

Credea d’averlo inteso.

Il C.

Si, se voluto aveste intendermi voi stessa.

Sus.

E mio dovere e quel di sua Eccellenza, e il mio volere.

SCENE I.—: A Cabinet.—The Count discovered, walking up and down, with an air of trouble and reflectionSusanna at the further end.

Count.

[Perceiving Susanna.] ’Tis Susanna!—who knows? may-be she’s told the Countess of my intriguing; if she’s betray’d me, her lover weds the old woman. [To Susanna.] What brings you hither?

Sus.

I fear’d that you were angry, sir.

Count.

There’s something that you want, now.

Sus.

My Lord, your noble Countess has got her usual vapors, and has dispatch’d me for her smelling-bottle.

Count.

Then, take it.

Sus.

I’ll soon return it.

Count.

Oh, no: if you require it, keep it yourself.

Sus.

Myself? Vapors, sir, belong but to ladies of fashion.

Count.

[Ironically.] But a damsel who’s like to lose her husband upon the day of marriage—

Sus.

By giving to Marcellina the dowry you promised to Susanna—

Count.

When did I make such promise?

Sus.

I thought I heard you say so.

Edition: current; Page: [25]
Count.

Yes, on condition that you listen to my wishes.

Sus.

Oh, that’s my duty; but, sooth, I do not know what it is you do wish.

Duetto.—Il Conte e Susanna.

Il C.
  • Crudel! perche finora
  • Farmi languir così?
Sus.
  • Signor, la donna ognora
  • Tempo ha di dir di sì.
Il C.
  • Danque in giardin verrai?
Sus.
  • Se piace a voi, verrò.
Il C.
  • E non mi mancherai?
Sus.
  • No, non vi mancherò!

Duet.—Count and Susanna.

Count.
  • Too long you have deceived me;
  • Hope, weary, bids farewell.
Sus.
  • What passes in her bosom
  • A maiden dreads to tell.
Count.
  • You’ll meet me in the grove, then?
Sus.
  • When sunset’s on the lea.
Count.
  • And do not mean it falsely?
Sus.
  • Oh no; rely on me!
lf1398_figure_010.jpg
Edition: current; Page: [26]
lf1398_figure_011.jpg

MI SENTO DAL CONTENTO—WHAT TRANSPORT NOW IS FLYING.

Duet. Count and Susanna.

Il C.

E perchè fosti meco sta mattina si austera?

Sus.

Col Paggio—ch’ivi c’era.

Il C.

E vero, e vero; mi prometti poi. Se tu manchi, O cor mio—Ma la Contessa attenderà il vasetto.

Sus.

E fù un pretesso, parlato io non aurei senza di questo.

Il C.

Bravissima!

Sus.

Vien gente!

Il C.

[Ritirando.] E mia senz’ altro.

[Parte.

Sus.

[Sola.] Forbitevi la bocca, O Signor scaltro.

Entra Figaro.

Fig.

Ehi, Susanna, ove vai?

Sus.

Taci! senza avocato, hai gia vinta la causa.

Fig.

Cos’ è nato?

[Susanna fugge; Figaro la segue; Il Conte, che ha sentite dal fondo le ultime parole, torna.

Il C.

“Hai gia vinta la causa!” Cosa sento! In qual laccio cadea! Perfidi! io voglio, di tal modo punirvi; a piacer mio la sentenza sarà. Ma s’ei pagasse la vecchia pretendente! Pagarla!—in qual maniera? E po v’e Antonio, che a un incognito Figaro ricusa di dare una nipote in matrimonio. Coltivando l’or goglio di questo mentecatto. Tutto giova a un raggiro; il colpo è fatto.

Count.

But what made you so cross and so disdainful this morning?

Sus.

The Page, sir—you forget him.

Count.

But then Basilio, who spoke in my behalf?

Sus.

Why should we need to employ a Basilio?

Count.

Well thought of—well thought of; and, then, you truly promise we shall meet in the garden? But, now, the Countess waits for the smelling-bottle.

Sus.

That was pretext, sir, and meant to bring about this conversation.

Count.

Bravissima!

Edition: current; Page: [27]
Sus.

A footstep!

Count.

[As he retires.] I have subdued her.

[Exit.

Sus.

[Alone.] Well, cunning as you are, sir, this time we beat you.

Enter Figaro.

Fig.

Now, my dear, whither go you?

Sus.

Silence! without aid from you, know the cause is victorious.

Fig.

What has happened?

[Susanna runs away; Figaro follows her; the Count, who has heard from the back of the stage the last words, returns.

Count.

“Know the cause is victorious!” Is it so, ma’am? In what a snare had I fallen! Infamous! the traitors!—but, trust me, both of you shall regret it; your sentence I’ll give as my anger directs. But, if he’s able to pay our Marcellina?—to pay her!—and in what manner? Then there’s Antonio, who to Figaro angrily refuses to give his niece’s hand at all in marriage. I’ll encourage this feeling, and fan the fool’s ambition. Do your worst, I defy you; you’re fairly beaten.

Aria.—Il Conte.

    • Vedrò, mentr’ io sospiro,
    • Felice un servo mio?
    • E un ben, che in van desio,
    • Ei posseder dovrà?
    • Vediò per man d’amore,
    • Unita a un vile oggetto,
    • Chi in mi destò un affetto,
    • Che per me poi non ha!
    • Ah no! lasciarti in pace,
    • Non vò questo contento,
    • Tu non nascesti, audace,
    • Per dare a me tormento;
    • E forse ancor per ridere,
    • Di mia infelicità.
    • Già la speranza sola
    • Delle vendette mie
    • Quest’ animo consola;
    • E giubilar mi fa.
    • Ah! che! lasciarti, &c.

Entrano Don Curzio, accompagnato da e parlando con Marcellina, Bartolo, e Figaro.

Don C.

E decisa la lite: o pagarla, o sposarla.

Il C.

E giusta la sentenza: o pagar, o sposar. Bravo, Don Curzio.

Fig.

Son gentiluomo! E senza l’ assenso de’ miei nobili parenti—

Il C.

Dove sono? chi sono?

Don C.

Il testimonio?

Fig.

L’oro, le gemme, e i ricamati panni, che ne più teneri anni mi ritrovaro adosso i masnadieri—Sono gl’ indizi veri di mia nascita illustre? E, sopra tutto questo, al mio braccio impresso geroglifico.

[Alzando la manica.

Mar.

Una spatola, impresso al braccio destro?

[Con premura.

Fig.

E a voi chi’l disse?

Mar.

Oh dio? è desso!

Fig.

E ver son io!

Don C.

Chi?

Il C.

Chi?

Bar.

Chi?

Mar.

Rafaello!

Bar.

E i ladri ti rapir—

Fig.

Presso un castello.

Bar.

Ecco tua madre!

[Indicando Marcellina.

Fig.

Balia!

Bar.

No, tua madre!

Don C. e Il C.

[Aparte.] Sua madre?

Fig.

[Aparte.] Cosa sento?

Mar.

[Mostrando Bartolo.] Ecco tuo padre!

Air.—The Count.

    • Shall I, then, be rejected?
    • My rank and name neglected?
    • While he, a lowly vassal,
    • Her maiden heart beguiles?
    • Oh, well they paint love’s blindness,
    • By fancy mov’d, not kindness,
    • His arrows dipp’d in venom,
    • And falsest when he smiles.
    • Beware, beware, beware!
    • Beware, my treach’rous beauty;
    • Too long you’ve promis’d duty;
    • Too long you’ve both deceiv’d me,
    • And, fool-like, I believ’d ye!
    • Now comes my turn for glory!
    • Soon shall the traitor Figaro
    • Regret the part he play’d.
    • Through Marcellina’s story,
    • Sure is my triumph o’er ye;
    • For love and faith betray’d—
    • Beware, my treach’rous beauty, &c.

Enter Don Curzio, accompanied by and speaking with Marcellina, Bartolo, and Figaro.

Don C.

The dispute is thus settled: he must pay her, or wed her.

Count.

The sentence is judicious: pay you must, or else wed her. Bravo, Curzio.

Fig.

But I’m well born, sir!—without permission of both my illustrious parents—

Count.

Parents, traitor! who are they?

Don C.

Your testimonials?

Fig.

Many—the jewels, the rich embroider’d garments, which, in my earliest childhood, were by the robbers taken from my person—Are they not proofs decisive?—proofs of noble extraction? And, more than all the rest, on my arm’s impress’d a hieroglyphic, too.

[Turning up his sleeve.

Mar.

Is’t a spatula, on the right arm printed?

[With eagerness.

Fig.

How know you of it?

Mar.

Ye powers! ’tis he, then!

Fig.

’Tis I, most certain!

Don C.

Who?

Count.

Who?

Bar.

Who?

Mar.

Rafaello?

Edition: current; Page: [28]
Bar.

’Mongst thieves you fell, and near—

Fig.

Near to a castle.

Bas.

Behold your mother!

[Pointing to Morcellina.

Fig.

My nurse, sir!

Bar.

No, your mother!

Don C. & Count.

[Aside.] His mother?

Fig.

Can it be, sir?

Mar.

[Pointing to Bartolo.] He is your father!

Sestetto.—Marcellina, Don Curzio, Conte, Bartolo, e Figaro.

Mar.
  • Riconosci in questo amplesso
  • Una madre, amato figlio!
  • [Si abbracciamo.
Fig.
  • Padre mio! Fatelo stesso
  • Non mi fate più arrossir.
Bar.
  • Resistenza la coscienza
  • Far non lascia al tuo desir.
Don C.
  • Ei suo padre? ella sua madre?
  • L’imeneo non può seguir.
Mar.
  • Figlio amato!
Fig.
  • Cara madre!
Bar.
  • Caro figlio!
Fig.
  • Amato padre!
Il C.
  • [Aparte.] Meglio è assai di quà partir.
Bar.
  • Figlio amato!
Fig.
  • Parenti amati!
  • [Il Conte partendo.

Entra Susanna, con una borsa di denari in mano, e lo trattiene.

Sus.
  • Alto, alto, Signor Conte;
  • Mille doppie son quì pronte:
  • A pagar vengo per Figaro!
  • Ed a porlo in libertà!
  • [Accennando Figaro abbracciato con Marcellina.
Don C.
  • Non sappiam com’ è la cosa.
Il C.
  • Non sappiam com’ è la cosa;
  • Osservate un poco là!
Sus.
  • Già d’accordo colla sposa?
  • Giusti Dei! che infedeltà!
  • Lascia iniquo!
  • [Vuol partire; Figaro la trattiene.
Fig.
  • No, t’arresta!
  • Senti, O cara!
Sus.
  • [Gli da uno schiaffo] Senti questa!
Mar.
  • E un effetto di buon core!
  • Tutto amore è quel che fa!
Il C.
  • Fremo, smanio, dal furore!
  • Il destino a me la fa!
Don C.
  • Fremo, e smania, dal furore!
  • Il destino gliela fa!
Sus.
  • Fremo, smanio, dal furore!
  • Una vecchia a me la fa!
Bar. }
  • E un effetto di buon core!
Fig. }
  • Tutto amore è quel che fa!
Mar.
  • Lo sdegno calmate,
  • Mia cara figliuola!
  • Sua madre abbracciate,
  • Che or vostra sarà.
Sus.
  • [A Bartolo.] Sua madre?
  • [Ad il Conte.] Sua madre?
  • [A Don Curzio.] Sua madre?
  • [A Marcellina.] Sua madre?
Bar. Il C. }
  • Sua madre?
Don C. Mar. }
Sus.
  • [A Figaro.] Tua madre?
Fig.
  • E quello è mio padre
  • Che a te lo dirà!
Sus.
  • Suo padre?
Bar. Il C. }
  • Suo padre!
Don C. Mar. }
Sus.
  • Tuo padre?
Fig.
  • E quella è mia madre,
  • Che a te lo dirà.
Sus. }
  • Al dolce contento
Mar. }
  • Di questo momento!
Bar. }
  • Quest’ anima appena
Fig. }
  • Resister or sa.
Don C. }
  • Al fiero tormento
Il C. }
  • Di questa, &c.
  • [Escono Il Conte e Don Curzio.
Mar.
  • Prendi—questo è il biglietto, del denar che a me devi; ed è tua dote.
Sus.
  • Prende ancor, questa borsa.
Bar.
  • E questa ancora.
Fig.
  • Bravi! gittale pur, ch’ io piglio ognora!
Sus.
  • Voliamo ad informar d’ogni avventura Madama e nostro Zio. Chi al par di me contenta!
Fig. Bar. e Mar.
  • Io!
Mar. Bar. e Fig.
  • E schiatti il Signor Conte al gusto mio!
  • [Partono.

Entra la Contessa, guardando intorno anziosamente.

Sestett.—Marcellina, Don Curzio, Count, Bartolo, and Figaro.

Mar.
  • Oh, let this embrace discover
  • That I am in truth your mother.
  • [They embrace.
Fig.
  • Father, sure! you’ll now give over
  • Playing tricks upon your own.
Bar.
  • Say no more, son; that is o’er, son;
  • You are mine, and mine alone.
Don C.
  • Is it so, sir? then you know, sir,
  • This same marriage can’t take place.
Mar.
  • I’m delighted!
Fig.
  • Dear mother!
Bar.
  • Dear son!
Fig.
  • Beloved father!
Count.
  • [Aside.] I had better be gone.
Bar.
  • I’m delighted!
Fig.
  • I now am righted.
  • [The Count about to go off.

Enter Susanna, with a purse in her hand, meeting the Count, and stopping him.

Sus.
  • Stop, my noble master, pray you;
  • I the marriage fine will pay you.
  • Here the ducats are for Figaro,—
  • He, sir, once again is free.
  • [Observes Marcellina embracing Figaro.
Don C.
  • Things seem strangely now perverted—
Count.
  • Things seem strangely now perverted,
  • Only look, and you will see.
Sus.
  • Am I, then, for her deserted?
  • And is this your faith to me?
  • But I leave thee.
  • [Going; Figaro detains her.
Fig.
  • No; believe me—
  • Hear me, my dearest!
Sus.
  • [Boxing his ears.] Thus I hear thee.
Mar.
  • Joy inspires me, pleasure fires me;
  • Now, indeed, I’m truly bless’d.
Count. }
Don C. }
  • Baffled, raging, well nigh frantic.
Sus. }
Bar. }
  • Oh, what anger fills hismy breast!
Fig. }
Mar.
  • Let’s love one another,
  • My daughter, my dearest!
  • For I am his mother,
  • And soon will be yours.
Sus.
  • [To Bartolo.] His mother?
  • [To the Count.] His mother?
  • [To Don Curzio.] His mother?
  • [To Marcellina.] His mother?
Bar. Count. }
  • His mother?
Don C. Mar. }
Sus.
  • [To Figaro.] Your mother?
Fig.
  • And here is my father,
  • So long sought in vain.
Sus.
  • His father?
Bar. Don C. }
  • His father!
Mar. Count. }
Sus.
  • Your father!
Edition: current; Page: [29]
Fig.
  • And here is my mother—
  • I clasp her again.
Sus. }
Mar. }
  • Oh, fortune! oh, change unexpected!
Bar. }
  • Who could have suspected
Fig. }
  • A moment like this?
Don C. }
Count. }

[Exeunt Count and Don Curzio.

Mar.
  • Take it—’tis a receipt, son, for the gold that you
  • owe me—your marriage portion.
Sus.
  • Take this purse, too; yes, take it.
Bar.
  • And this from me, son.
Fig.
  • Bravi! as many as you please—I’ll take all!
Sus.
  • Let’s fly and tell the Countess and my uncle the
  • whole as it happen’d. Oh, I’m so glad, so happy.
Fig. Bar. & Mar.
  • I too.
Sus. Mar. Bar. & Fig.
  • And only think the passion the
  • Count will be in!
  • [Exeunt.

Enter the Countess, looking about anxiously.

Recitativo e Aria.—La Contessa.

  • E Susanna non vien?
  • Sono ansiosa di saper come il Conte
  • Accolse la proposta. Alquanto ardito,
  • Il progetto mi par.
  • E ad uno sposo si vivace
  • E geloso! Ma che mal c’e?
  • Cangiando i miei vestiti con quelli
  • Di Susanna, e i suoi co’miei:
  • Al favor della notte. Oh, cielo!
  • A qual umil stato fatale
  • Io son ridotta da un consorte crudel!
  • Che dopo avermi con un misto
  • Inaudito d’infedeltà,
  • Di gelosia, di sdegni, prima amata,
  • Indi offesa, e alfin tradita,
  • Fammi or cercar da un mia serva aita!

Recitative and Air—Countess.

  • Still Susanna not come?
  • I am anxious to hear how my husband
  • Receives the proposition;—the jest’s a bold one,
  • And I fear the result.
  • The Count is hasty and suspicious—
  • He’ll be furious—yet where’s the harm?
  • I merely change my garments, and take those
  • Of Susanna; each plays the other,
  • And the darkness protects us. Oh, heavens!
  • To what paltry tricks am I driven,
  • Of me unworthy, by my husband’s fault.
  • Was ever lot so hard as mine,
  • And so little deserv’d by me?
  • A husband faithless, yet jealous and suspicious,
  • Even while he the most betrays me!
  • Ah, what a change, ere yet a year is over!
lf1398_figure_012.jpg
Edition: current; Page: [30]
lf1398_figure_013.jpg

DOVE SONO—THEY ARE OVER. Air. Countess.

  • Ah! se almen la mia costanza,
  • Nel languire amando ognor,
  • Mi portasse una speranza
  • Di cangiar l’ingrato cor!

Entra il Conte, sequito da Antonia col cappello da ufiziale di Cherubino in mano.

Ant.

Lo vi dico, Signor, che Cherubino è ancora nel castello, e vedete per prova il suo cappello.

Il C.

Ma come se a quest’ ora esser giunto a Siviglia egli dovria?

Ant.

Scusate, oggi Siviglia è a casa mia; la, vestissi da donna, e là lasciati ha’ gl’ altri abiti suoi.

Il C.

[Aparte.] Perfidi!

Ant.

Andiam, e li vedrete voi

[Partono.

Entrano la Contessa e Susanna, che vengono insieme.

La C.

Cosa mi narri? E che ne disse il Conte?

Sus.

Gli si leggeva in fronte, il dispetto, la rabbia.

La C.

Piano, che meglio or lo porremo in gabbia! Dov’ è l’ appuntamento, che tu gli proponesti!

Sus.

In giardino.

La C.

Fissiamogli un loco. Scrivi—

Sus.

Cli’io scriva, ma signora—

La C.

Scrivi dico e tutto io prendo su me stessa—[Dettando a Susanna, che si mette a tavola e scrive]—canzonetta su l’aria—

  • No; ’tis but as a passing shadow,
  • Such as clouds the summer-day:
  • He again will love more truly,
  • That his heart has been astray.

Enter the Count, followed by Antonio, with Cherubino’s regimental hat in his hand.

Ant.

Take my word, good my lord, that Cherubino remains still in the castle, and the proof of it is here—his hat and feather.

Count.

I searcely can believe it: he is surely far away, at Seville.

Ant.

If he’s at Seville, then Seville is in my cottage: there, in a woman’s garments, I vow, they dress’d him, and there he left his clothes.

Count.

[Aside.] What deceit!

Ant.

This way, and you’ll be sure to catch him.

[Exeunt.

Enter Countess and Susanna, together.

Countess.

How did he take it? what did he say about it?

Sus.

Oh, he look’d full of fury, and he muttered of vengeance.

Countess.

Better and better; now we shall surely catch him! What place did you appoint him? let’s hear, my good Susanna.

Sus.

In the garden.

Countess.

That be the spot, then. Write now—

Sus.

But only think, Signora—

Countess.

Write, write, I tell you—I’ll take the blame upon myself, child—[Dictating to Susanna, who places herself at the table]—a song to this tune—

lf1398_figure_014.jpg
Edition: current; Page: [31]
lf1398_figure_015.jpg

SULL’ARIA!—THE ZEPHYR! Duet. Susanna and Countess.

Sus.

Piegato e’il foglio, or come si siglio?

La C.

Ecco! Prendi uno spillo; servirà di sigillo. Attendi; acrivi sul riverso del foglio, “Rimandate il sigillo.

[Susanna scrive

Sus.

E più bizzaro di quel pella patente.

La C.

Presto nascondi—io sento venir gente.

[Susanna nasconde la lettera in suo seno.

Viene Cherubino in abita di contadinella: e Barberina con varie altre Contadine, che portano dei mazzetti di fiori e gli presentano alla Contessa

Sus.

The letter’s folded; and now with what to seal it?

Countess.

Seal it? Here’s a needle; sure, ’twill answer the purpose. Now mind me, write on the outside of the letter, “Send the seal back directly.”

[Susanna writes.

Sus.

A seal much stranger than that on the commission.

Countess.

Now hide it quickly—I hear the sounds of footsteps.

[Susanna hides the letter in her bosom.

Edition: current; Page: [32]

Enter Peasant Girls, Cherubino disguised as one of them, and Barbarina. They all carry nosegays, which they present to the Countess.

Duetto.—Cherubino e Barberina.

  • Ricevete, O padroncina
  • Queste rose e questi fior,
  • Che abbiam colti stamattina,
  • Per mostrarvi il nostro amor.
  • Siamo tante contadine,
  • E siam tutte poverine,
  • Ma quel poco che rechiamo
  • Velo diamo di buon cor!
La C.

Venite quì, datemi i vostri fiori; [Prende i fiori da Cherubino e bacia la sua fronte,] come arossi—Susanna, e non ti pare, ch’e somigli ad alcuno?

Sus.

Al naturale!

Entrano il Conte ed Antonio, chi tira Cherubino dalle Villanelle e gli leva la cuffia; la cappellatura gli cade sulle spalle. Dunque gli pone il capello da uffiziale in testa.

Ant.

Eh, Cospettaccio! è questo l’uffiziale!

La C.

O, stelle!

Sus.

[Aparte.] Malandrino!

Il C.

Ebben, Madama.

[Alla Contessa.

[A Cherubino.] E perchè non partisti?

Che.

Signor!—

[Esitando.

Il C.

Saprò punire la tua disubbidienza.

Entra Figaro.

Fig.

Signor, se trattenete tutte queste ragazze, addio teste, addio danza.

Il C.

E che? vorresti ballar col pie’ stravolto?

[Ironico.

Fig.

Eh, non mi duol più molto. Andiam, belle fanciulle!

La C.

[Aparte a Susanna.] Come si cavera dall’ imbarazzo!

Sus.

Lasciate fare a lui.

Il C.

[Segnatamente a Figaro.] Per buona sorte i vasi eran di creta.

Fig.

Senza fallo—andiamo dunque; andiamo!

Ant.

Ed intanto a cavallo di galoppo a Siviglia andava il Paggio?

Fig.

Di galoppo o di passo; buon viaggio! Venite, O belle giovani!

[Si sente la marcia in lontano.

Fig.

Ecco la marcia! andiamo;

Ai vostri posti, o belle, ai vostri posti!

[Usciono le Paesane. Sta Cherubino con qli occhi abbassati. Il Conte fa seqnale a Figaro di ritararsi.

Susanna, dammi il braccio!

Sus.

Eccolo.

[Partono tutti eccetto il Conte e la Contessa.

Il C.

Temerari!

La C.

Io son di ghiaccio!

Il C.

Contessa—

La C.

Or non parliamo;

Ecco quì le due nozze!

Riceverle doviam, alfin si tratta

D’una vostra protetta.

Il C.

Seggiamo—

[Prendono ambidue i luoghi loro.

[Aparte.] E meditiam vendetta!

[Partono.

Duet.—Cherubino and Barbarina.

  • Gentle lady, take these garlands,
  • Which in humble love we bring;
  • Vi’lets sweet, and blushing roses,
  • That around their sweetness fling.
  • Though they’re only simple flowers,
  • Gemm’d with morning’s early showers,
  • They are all we have to give;
  • Long and happy may you live!
Countess.

Come hither, child; give me your flowers; [Takes the flowers from Cherubino, and kisses his forehead,] no cause to blush—Susanna, is she not like him?

Sus.

Oh, very like, Ma’am.

Enter the Count and Antonio. The latter pulls Cherubino from amongst the girls, and takes off his bonnet, when his long hair falls down about his shoulders. He then places a military cap on his head.

Ant.

Ah, cospetto! behold your gallant soldier!

Countess.

Good heavens!

Sus.

[Aside] Mischief-maker!

Count.

[To the Countess.] How now, Signora?

[To Cherubino.] And why have you remain’d, then?

Che.

My Lord—

[Hesitates.

Count.

I now will teach you that I can be indignant.

Enter Figaro.

Fig.

My Lord—my Lord, if you detain these pretty maidens, farewell feasting, farewell dancing.

Count.

You dance? I thought you had sprained your foot severely?

[Ironically.

Fig.

Oh, now I do not feel it. Come on—this way, my beauties!

Countess.

[Aside to Susanna.] How will he extricate himself, I wonder!

Sus.

He’ll manage it, no fear, Ma’am.

Count.

[Pointedly to Figaro.] ’Twas very lucky the flowerpots were but earthen.

Fig.

Very—very—now, then, my fair ones; come follow.

Ant.

I think that you told us Cherubino was off for Seville, at full gallop?

Fig.

At a gallop or an amble, luck be with him! Come on, my pretty villagers!

[A march heard in the distance.

Fig.

Hark to the march there!—away, girls!

Take up your places—my beauties, to your places.

[The Peasant-Girls go out. Cherubino stands with downcast eyes. The Count signs to Figaro to leave them.

Your arm to me, Susanna.

Sus.

Here it is! [Exeunt all except the Count and Countess.

Count.

Oh, the traitors!

Countess.

My fears confound me.

Count.

Now, Countess—

Countess.

I pray, be silent;

Here comes the double wedding!

Receive them as you ought, and make them happy.

Count.

Let us be seated—

[They both take their places.

[Aside.] And here I’ll brood on vengeance!

[Exeunt.

SCENA II.—: Sala ricca, con trono, preparata a festa nuziale.

Il Conte è scoperto, seduto sul trono.

Entrano varie Contadinelle, chi portano il cappellino virginale, ornato di piume bianche, il velo, i guanti, ed il mazzetto, per Susanna e per Marcellina. Bartolo e Figaro vengono insieme. Antonio conduce Susanna dinanzi al Conte, ed ella s’ inginocchia. Mentre il Conte le pone in testa il cappellino, ed il velo, e le dà i guanti ed il mazzetto, si canti il Coro. Susanna dà al Conte furtivamente un viglietto, ed egli se lo pone in seno con destrezza. Figaro viene a ricever Susanna dalle mani del Conte, e si ritira dall’ altra parte vicino a Marcellina. Segue intanto una lieta danza.

SCENE II.—: A splendid Saloon, with a throne in it, prepared for a wedding festival.

The Count, seated on the throne.

Enter a party of Country Girls, bearing a little virginal hat, adorned with white feathers, the veil, the gloves, and the nose Edition: current; Page: [33] gays, for Susanna and Marcellina. Then Bartolo and Figaro together. Next, Antonio, who leads Susanna before the Count, and she kneels. While the Count puts the hat on her head, and presents the veil, the gloves, and the nosegay, the Chorus is sung. Susanna slily gives the Count a note, and he puts it dexterously into his waistcoat. Figaro comes to receive Susanna from the hands of the Count, and withdraws on the other side, near Marcellina. Then follows a merry dance.

lf1398_figure_016.jpg

AMANTI COSTANTI—YE LOVERS, FOR WHOM NOW THE ALTAR. Chorus.

  • A un dritto cedendo,
  • Che oltraggia, che offende
  • Ei caste vi rende
  • Ai vostri amator!
  • Cantiamo, lodiamo
  • Si saggio Signor!

[Cantandosi l’ultimo verso, Susanna s’inginocchia al Conte, chi mette sulla fronte di lei la ghirlanda nuziale. Ella tira segretamente la manica di lui per attrare le sua attenzione, e dunque fingendo aggiustare la ghirlanda gli da nel mano il biglietto. A quale avanza il Conte ed affrettandosi aprire il biglietto si pugne il dito coll’ ago che lo lega.

Il C.

Eh già solita l’usanza! le donne ficcan gli aghi in ogni loco. [Leggendo il direzione di rimandare il sigillo.] Ah, ah! capisco il gioco.

[Cerca lo spillo sulla terra.

Fig.

[A Susanna.] Un biglietto amoroso che gli die nel passar qualche galante—ed era sigillato d’uno spillo: ond’ ei si punse il dito—il Narciso or la cerca—oh, che stordito!

[Il Conte trova lo spillo, e lo prende, finisce il ballo.

Il C.

Andate, amici, e sia per questa sera

  • Disposto l’apparato nuziale
  • Colla più ricca pompa;
  • Io vò che sia magnifica la festa!
  • E canti, e fuochi e gran cena,
  • E gran ballo, e ognuno impari com’
  • Io tratto color, che a me son cari!
  • His fame live for ever,
  • His happiness never
  • By shadow be darken’d,
  • That comes o’er his rest.
  • Long life to the master
  • Who makes us so bless’d;
  • May sorrow and trouble
  • Ne’er break on his rest!

[While the last verse is being sung, Susanna kneels to the Count, who places upon her head the bridal wreath. She secretly pulls him by the sleeve, to call his attention, and then, pretending to adjust the wreath, slips a note into his hand. The Count comes to the front, and, in his hurry to open the note, pricks his finger with the needle with which it is fastened.

Count.

Zounds! ’tis ever sure to be so; one can’t come near these women for their needles. [Reading the direction to return the needle.] But hold! I read the riddle.

[He searches on the ground for the needle.

Fig.

[To Susanna.] Ah! no doubt a love epistle, that some one on the sly has given to him—and, wonderful, ’twas fasten’d with a needle, too. Ah! it has pricked his lordship’s finger—and now he’s looking for it—ah, how stupid!

[The Count finds the pin, and picks it up, as the dance ends.

Count.
  • Away, my friends, now, and make your preparations;
  • I wish the marriage feast to be splendid,
  • And a thing to be talked of,
  • In times to come, by the children of your children,
  • With singing, with dancing, and with feasting,
  • And with drinking, be all as happy
  • As your hearts can desire, or love can wish you!

Coro—[ancora.]

Cantiamo, lodiamo, &c.

Chorus—[resumed.]

Long life to the master, &c.

SCENA III.—: Unc gabinetto, come sovra.

Entra Barberina come cercando qualche cosa che aveva perduta.

SCENE III.—: A Cabinet, as before.

Enter Barbarina, as if seeking something that she had lost.

Aria.—Barberina.

  • L’ho perduta—me meschina!
  • Ah! chi sa dove sarà?
  • Non la trovo—e mia cugina—
  • E il padron cosa dirà?
  • [Cercando qualche cosa par terra.

Entrano Figaro e Marcellina.

Fig.

Barberina, cos ’hai?

Barb.

L’ ho perduta, cugino.

Fig.

Cosa?

Mar.

Cosa?

Barb.

Lo spillo che a me diede il padrone per recar a Susanna.

Fig.

A Susanna?—lo spillo?

Barb.

A te già niente preme.

Fig.

Oh, niente, niente!

Barb.

Addio, mio bel cugino! Vo da Susanna, e poi da Cherubino.

[Parte.

Fig.

Madre!

Mar.

Figlio?

Fig.

Son morto!

Mar.

Calmati, figlio mio!

Fig.

Son morto—dico!

Mar.

Flemma, flemma—e poi flemma; il fatto è serio, e pensarci convien; ma guarda un poco che ancor non sai di che si prenda gioco.

Fig.

Ah quello spillo, o madre, e quello stesso che poc’ anzi ei raccolsa.

Mar.

Evver; ma questo al più ti porge un dritto di stare in guardia e vivere in sospetto; ma non sai se in effetto.

Fig.

C’o l’arte dunque. Il loco del congresso so dov’ è stabilito.

Mar.

Dove vai figlio mio?

Fig.

A vendicar tutti i mariti. Addio!

[Partono.

Air.—Barbarina.

  • Oh, unlucky little needle!
  • How I wonder where you’ve got!
  • Ah! was ever girl forlorner?
  • I have sought you in each corner,
  • But still can find you not.
  • [Looking for something on the ground

Enter Figaro and Marcellina.

Fig.

What’s the matter? what seek you?

Barb.

I have lost it, good cousin.

Fig.

Lost it?

Mar.

Lost what?

Barb.

The needle which his Lordship desired me to convey to Susanna.

Fig.

To Susanna?—a needle?

Barb.

This in no way can concern you.

Fig.

Of course not, dearest!

Barb.

Adieu, my handsome cousin! Now for Susanna, and then for Cherubino.

[Exit.

Fig.

Mother!

Mar.

Well, child?

Fig.

I’m dying!

Mar.

Calm yourself, I entreat you.

Fig.

I can’t—I’m dying!

Mar.

Coolness—coolness—always coolness; the matter’s serious, and requires you to think; remember, too, son, you do not know as yet the secret object.

Fig.

I know the needle, dear mother, in truth’s the very same I saw with the letter.

Mar.

Perhaps; but this, at most, gives you a right, now, to be suspicious, and take in time precaution; it has taught nothing certain.

Fig.

So be it, mother. No fear of my forgetting where they’ve fix’d for the meeting.

Mar.

Whither, son, are you going?

Fig.

To vindicate the rights of husbands. Adieu!

[Exeunt.

SCENA IV.—: Giardino con due padiglione paralelle practicabile.

Entra Figaro, solo.

Fig.
  • Tutto è disposto; l’ora dovrebbe esser
  • Vicina. Io sento gente—è dessa!
  • Non è alcun. Buja è la notte!
  • Ed io comincio ormai!—
  • A fare il scimunito
  • Mestiere di marito!
  • Ingrata! nel momento della mía
  • Ceremonia! Ei godeva leggendo,
  • E nel vederlo—io rideva
  • Di me, senza saperlo. O Susanna!
  • Susanna! quanta penar mi costi!
  • Con quell’ ingenua faccia
  • Con quegli occhj innocenti?
  • Chi creduto [Editor: illegible word]
  • Ah che il fidarsi a donna
  • E ognor follia.
Edition: current; Page: [34]

SCENE IV.—: A Garden, with a practicable Pavilion on each side.

Enter Figaro, solus.

Fig.
  • All, then, is ready; nor can the moment now
  • Be distant. Some one is coming—’tis she, then—
  • No, I’m wrong. How dark the night is!
  • A pretty part I’m playing!—
  • A part I used to mock—
  • The poor, suspicious, cheated husband!
  • The traitress! on the evening of our marriage
  • Thus to use me! He laugh’d, too, as he read it,
  • And I laugh’d with him—little thought
  • That so nearly it concern’d me. Oh, Susanna!
  • Susanna! what despair you have caus’d me!
  • Ah, who would not have trusted
  • To such innocent features?
  • To a smile so enchanting?
  • To put one’s faith in a woman is but folly;
  • Nay, downright madness.
Edition: current; Page: [35]
lf1398_figure_017.jpg

APRITE UN PO QUEGL’ OCCHJ—YE MEN, WHO WIVES TAKE PRIDE IN. Air. Figaro.

Edition: current; Page: [36]

[Figaro ritira al fondo.

Entra Susanna in abito della Contessa, e la Contessa in abito di Susanna, seguitata da Marcellina.

Sus.

Signora, ella mi disse che Figaro verrebbe!

Mar.

Anzi è venuto: abbassa un pò la voce!

Sus.

Dunque un ci ascolta—e l’altro dee venir a cercarmi; incominciam.

Mar.

Io voglio quì celarmi.

[Si ritira al padiglione a sinistra.

Sus.

Madama, voi tremete! avreste freddo.

La C.

Parmi umida la notte: io mi ritiro.

[Si ritira al padiglione a destra.

Fig.

[Di dietro.] Eccoci della crisi al grande istante?

Sus.

[Con alta voce.] Io sotto queste piante, se madama il permette, resto, a prendere il fresco una mezz’ ora.

Fig.

[Di dietro.] Il fresco—il fresco?

La C.

[Di dietro.] Restaci in buon ora.

Sus.

[Aparte.] Il birbo è in sentinella? divertiamci anche noi. Diamo gli la mercè de dubbi suoi!

[Figaro retires up the stage.

Enter Susanna, disguised as the Countess, and the Countess disguised as Susanna, followed by Marcellina.

Sus.

Signora, hold! she informs me that Figaro is coming.

Mar.

Hush! I can see him—more gently, child—in whispers!

Sus.

If one is watching, the other will be here, too, directly; so we’ll begin.

Mar.

Then here I’ll lie in ambush.

[She retires to left-hand pavilion.

Sus.

Signora, how you tremble! the cold has struck you.

Countess.

The night is damp and chilly: I will retire me.

[She retires to right-hand pavilion.

Fig.

[Behind.] So the important crisis is at hand, then?

Sus.

[Aloud.] I’ll rest me ’neath these lindens, if my lady will permit me; I would fain enjoy the breezes of the evening.

Fig.

[Behind.] The breezes—the breezes?

Countess.

[Behind.] Surely, if you wish it.

Sus.

[Aside.] Our sentry’s at his post, then? we’ll have rare sport, believe me. Now to increase the jealous fit upon him!

Recitativo ed Aria.—Susanna.

  • Giunse, alfin, il momento che godrò senza
  • Affano, in braccio all’ idol mio!
  • Timide cure, uscite
  • Dal mio petto! a turba non
  • Venite il mio diletto! Oh, come par,
  • Che all’ amoroso foco,
  • L’amenità del loco; la terra,
  • E il ciel risponda! Come la notte,
  • I furti mici seconda!

Recitative and Air.—Susanna.

  • Here, at length, is the moment so impatiently
  • Long’d for, when I may call thee mine, love!
  • Doubt and suspicion, away now;
  • Hence for ever; interrupt not
  • The joy that fills my bosom. All seems to wear
  • A cheerful aspect round me;
  • Brighter than wont the moonbeams; the flowers
  • Breathe sweeter perfumes. Come, my belov’d,
  • Evening’s shade is o’er us.
lf1398_figure_018.jpg
Edition: current; Page: [37]
lf1398_figure_019.jpg

DEH VIENI, NON TARDAR—AH, WHY SO LONG DELAY. Air. Susanna.

Fig. [Al fondo.] Perfida! e in quella forma meco mentia! non so s’io vegli o dorma?

Entra Cherubino, cantando

Che.

La, la, la, la!

La C.

[Avanzandoso.] Il picciol paggio!

Che.

Io sento gente! Entriamo ove entrò Barberina! Oh vedo quì, una donna!

La C.

Ahimè meschina!

Che.

M’inganno! a quel cappello, che nell’ombra vegg’io, parmi Susanna!

La C.

E se il Conte ora vien! sorte tiranna!

Fig. [Behind.] Horrible! I scarcely can believe my senses! am I awake or dreaming?

Enter Cherubino, singing.

Che.

La, la, la, la!

Countess.

[Coming forward.] His little pageship!

Che.

I hear a footstep! But now for my dear Barbarina!—A petticoat, by heavens!

Countess.

Ah, how unlucky!

Che.

What fortune! by that hat now, if I see aright, ’tis our Susanna!

Countess.

If the Count should approach, I shall be ruined.

Finale.

Che.
  • Pian, pianin le andrò più presso
  • Tempo perso non sarà?
La C.
  • Ah se il Conte arriva adesso,
  • Qualche imbroglio accenderà!
Che.
  • Susannetta!
  • [Sta muta.
  • Non risponde—
  • Colla mano il volto asconde;
  • Or la burla—
  • Or la burla come va.
  • [La prende per la mano.
La C.
  • Arditello—sfacciatello!
  • Ite presto via di quà!
Che.
  • Smorfiosa—maliziosa!
  • Io già so perchè sei quà.

Il Conte va nascosamente per le porte di ferro; al sinistro sta Susanna, ed al destro Figaro.

Il C.

Ecco! quì la mia Susanna!

Sus. e Fig.

Ecco l’uccellatore!

Che.

[Tentando a baciare la Contessa.]

Non far meco la tiranna!

La C.

[A Cherubino.] Via, partite, o chiamo gente!

Che.

Dammi un bacio—o non fai niente.

Sus. Fig. e Il C.

Alla voce e quegli il Paggio!

La C.

Anche un bacio, che corraggio!

Sus. Fig. e Il C.

Temerario, temerario!

Che.
  • E perche far io non posso
  • Qualche il Conte ognor farà?
  • O veh, che smorfie!
  • Sai ch’io fui dietro il sofà!
Sus. La C. }

Se il ribaldo ancor stà saldo,

Il C. e Fig. }

La facenda guasterà.

Che.

I’m determined!

[Il Conte si mette fra loro, e riceve il bacio destinato per la Contessa.

La C. e Che.

O cielo! il Conte!

[Come Cherubino si retira, Figaro avanza in luogo di lui.

Fig.

Vo veder cosa fan là.

Il C.

Perchè voi non ripetete.

[Da al Figaro uno schiaffo, prendendolo per Cherubino.

Ricevete questo quà!

Il C. }
  • Ah! ci ha fatto
La C. }
  • Un bel guadagno—
  • Colla sua temerità.
Fig.
  • Ah! ci ha fatto
  • Un bel guadagno—
  • Colla mia curiosità.
  • [Ritira Figaro ancora, e Cherubino corre nel padiglione al sinistra.
Il C.
  • [Parlando alla Contessa in vece di Susanna.]
  • Partito è alfin l’audace;
  • Accostati ben mio.
La C.
  • [Imitando la voce di Susanna.]
  • Giacchè cosi vi piace—
  • Eccomi quì signor!
Fig.
  • [Aparte.] Che compiacente femmina—
  • Che sposa di buon cor!
Il C.
  • Porgimi la manina.
La C.
  • Io ve la do.
Il C.
  • [Baciando la sua mano.] Carina!
Fig.
  • Carina?
Il C.
  • Che dita tenerelle!
  • Che delicata pelle
  • Mi pizzica, mi stuzzica,
  • M’empie d’un nuovo ardor!
La C. }
  • La cieca prevenzione?
Sus. }
  • Delude la ragione
Fig. }
  • Inganna i sensi ognor.
  • [Il Conte prende dal suo dito un anello, e lo da alla Susanna finta.
Il C.
  • Oltre la dote, O cara,
  • Ricevi anco un brillante,
  • Che a te porge un’ amante—
  • Impegno del suo amor.
La C.
  • Tutto Susanna piglia
  • Dal suo benefattor.
Sus. Fig. }
  • Va tutto a maraviglia,
Il C. }
  • Ma il meglio manca ancoi
La C.
  • Signor, d’ accese fiaccole
  • Io veggio il balenar.
Il C.
  • Entriam, mia bella Venere,
  • Andiamoci a celar.
Fig. }
  • Marit scimuniti
Sus. }
  • Venite ad imparar.
La C.
  • Al bujo, Signor mio?
Il C.
  • E quello che vogl’io;
  • Tu sai che là per leggere
  • Io non desio d’entrar.
La C. }
  • I furbi sono in trappola,
Sus. }
  • Comincia ben l’affar.
Fig.
  • La perfida lo segui là,
  • E vano il dubitar.
  • [Figaro traversa presso il Conte.
Il C.
  • [Acutamente.] Chi passa?
Fig.
  • [Aspramente.] Passa gente.
La C.
  • E Figaro! men vò.
Il C.
  • [Indicando il padiglione al destra.]
  • Andate, andate: io poi verrò.
  • [La Contessa entra nel padiglione a dritto, il Conte va in fondo.
Fig.
  • [Solo.] Tutto è tranquillo, e placido;
  • Entrò la bella Venere
  • Col vago Marte prendere,
  • Nuovo Vulcan del secolo,
  • In rete la potrò.
  • [Susanna avvanza, e parla con voce fintra.
Sus.
  • Ehi, Figaro;—tacete!
Fig.
  • Oh! questa è la Contessa!
  • A tempo qui giungete,—
  • Vedrete da voi stessa
  • Il Conte, e la mia sposa;
  • Di propria man, la cosa
  • Toccar io vi farò.
Sus.
  • Parlate un pò più basso:
  • [S’obbliando e con voce alterato.
  • Di quà non muovo il passo,
  • Ma vendicarmi vò!
Fig.
  • [Aparte.] Susanna! [Forte.] Vendicarsi!
Sus.
  • Sì.
Fig.
  • Come! come potria farsi?
Sus.
  • L’iniquo io vò sorprendere;
  • Poi so quel che farò.
Fig.
  • La volpe vuol sorprendermi,
  • E secondarla vò.
  • Pace! pace mio dolce tesoro!
  • Io conobbi la voce che adoro!
  • E che impressa ognor serbo nel cor.

Entra il Conte.

Il C.
  • Non la trovo, è girai tutto il bosco.
Fig. Sus.
  • Questo è il Conte, alla voce il conosco.
Il C.
  • Ehi, Susanna—sei sorda? sei muta?
Sus.
  • Bella, bella! non l’ha conosciuta.
Fig.
  • Chi?
Sus.
  • Madama!
Fig.
  • Madama?
Sus.
  • Madama!
Fig. }
  • La commedia, idol mio, terminiamo;
Sus. }
  • Consoliamo il bizzaro amator!
Fig.
  • [Inginocchiandosi avanti a Susanna.]
  • Sì, madama, voi siete il ben mio!
Il C.
  • La mia sposa! Ah senz’ arme son io!
Fig.
  • Un ristoro al mio cor concedete!
Sus.
  • Io son quì, faccio quel che volete?
Il C.
  • Ah, ribaldi! ribaldi!
Fig. }
  • Ah corriamo, corriamo, mio bene,
Sus. }
  • E le pene compensi il piacer.
  • [Lasciano insieme il teatro ma il Conte aggrappa il mantello di Figaro, e Susanna corre nel padiglione al destra.
Il C.
  • Gente! gente! all’ armi! all’ armi!
Fig.
  • Ohimè! il padrone!
Il C.
  • Gente! gente! ajuto! ajuto!
Fig.
  • Son perduto!

Entrano Basilio, Antonio, Don Curzio, Bartolo, Servi e Paesani con torchj.

Bas. Ant. }
  • Cosa avenne? cosa avenne?
Don C. }
Il C.
  • Il scellerato m’ ha tradito
  • M’ ha infamato,
  • E con chi state a veder.
Bas. {
  • Son stordito!
Don C. {
  • Sbalordito!
Ant. {
  • Non mi par, che ciò sia ver.
  • Son storditi!
Fig. {
  • Sbalorditi!
  • O, che scena, che piacer!
  • [Il Conte entra improvvisamente nel padiglione, e tira per forza Cherubino, traendolo dalla Contessa. Seguono Barberina e Marcellina.
Il C.

In van resiste, uscite, Madama;

Il premio or averte, di vostro onestà.

[Scoprendo che tiene Cherubino.

Il paggio?

[Gettelo il Conte, e corre ancora nel padiglione.

Ant.

Mia figlia?

[Avanza Barberina.

Fig.

Mia madre?

[Il Conte ritorna, traendo Susanna, chi nasconde fra le mani il viso.

Tutti.

Madama!

Il C.

Scoperta è la trama,—

La perfida è quà.

Sus.
  • Perdono, perdono!
Il C.
  • No, no! non sperarlo.
Fig.
  • Perdono, perdono!
Il C.
  • No, no! non vo’ darlo!
Tutti.
  • Perdono, perdono!
Il C.
  • No, no, no!
  • [La Contessa avanzando, ed inginocchiandosi al Conte con aria maliziosetta.
La C.
  • Almeno io per loro perdono otterò?
Bas. }
  • O Cielo? che veggio? deliro? vaneggio?
Ant. }
  • Che creder, che creder non so,
Bart. }
  • Non so, non so.
Il C.
  • [Sbalordito e confuso.
  • Contessa, perdono!
  • Perdono! perdono!
La C.
  • Più docile sono,
  • E dico di sì.
Tutti.
  • Ah! tutti contenti
  • Saremo così!
  • Questo giorno di tormenti
  • Di capricci e di follia,
  • In contenti, e in allegria,
  • Solo amor può terminar.
  • Sposi, amici, al ballo, al giuoco
  • Alle mine dato fuoco,
  • Ed al suon di lieta marcia,
  • Corriam tutti a festeggiar!

Finale.

Che.
  • Gently, love; why all this terror?
  • You are not afraid of me?
Countess.
  • If the Count find us together,
  • What confusion there will be!
Che.
  • Susanetta!
  • [She remains silent.
  • Well, that’s civil!
  • Troubled with a silent devil!
  • Mighty fine, now!—
  • Dumb, and will not show your face.
  • Why am I in such disgrace?
  • [Takes her by the hand.
Countess.
  • This is shameful—past all bearing;
  • Take yourself away from here.
Che.
  • Susanna, how malicious!
  • Come unto these arms, my dear!

Enter the Count, stealthily, through the iron gates, Susanna being at the back on the left, Figaro on the right.

Count.

Ha! ’tis surely my Susanna!

Sus. & Fig.

Here he comes, our linnet-catcher.

Che.

[Struggling to kiss the Countess.]

Do not play the prude with me, love!

Countess.

[To Cherubino.] Hence, or I will call assistance.

Che.

One kiss only—no resistance.

Sus. Fig. & Count.

By the voice, ’tis Cherubino!

Countess.

How? a kiss? oh, what assurance!

Sus. Fig. & Count.

’Tis an outrage past endurance!

Che.
  • Why to me a kiss deny?
  • With the Count you are not shy!
  • Come, come, give o’er, then,
  • And strive no more, then;
  • One kiss to your little friend.
Sus. Countess, }

If he chatters thus much longer,

Count & Fig. }

To my plan he’ll put an end.

Che.

I’m determined!

[The Count steps between them, and receives the kiss intended for the Countess.

Countess & Che.

The Count! good heavens!

[As Cherubino draws back, Figaro advances into his place.

Fig.

I must see the end of this!

Count.

Take that, you little rascal!

[He gives a box on the ear to Figaro, whom he takes for Cherubino.

’Tis in payment for the kiss.

Edition: current; Page: [38]
Count. }
  • Ah, he’s got is; that’s for prying;
Countess. }
  • For the future he’ll be wiser,
  • Looking to himself alone.
Fig.
  • Ah, I’ve got it; that’s for prying;
  • For the future I’ll be wiser,
  • Looking to myself alone.
  • [Figaro retires again, and Cherubino runs off into the left-hand pavilion.
Count.
  • [Addressing the Countess in mistake for Susanna.]
  • He’s gone, and none can hear;
  • No jealous eye is near us.
Countess.
  • [Imitating Susanna’s voice.]
  • I wait your lordship’s pleasure,
  • And with a heart of love.
Fig.
  • [Behind.] Now that I call quite complaisant;—
  • Oh, what a faithful dove!
Count.
  • Give me your hand, Susanna.
Countess.
  • With pleasure, sir.
Count.
  • [Kissing her hand.] My dear one!
Fig.
  • His dear one!
Count.
  • What smooth and taper fingers!
  • Like those with which Aurora
  • Lifts up the veil of twilight
  • When first on earth she smiles.
Countess. }
  • Was ever such delusion?
Sus. }
  • He’ll find, to his confusion,
Fig. }
  • How deep are woman’s wiles.
  • [The Count takes a diamond ring from his finger, and gives it to the supposed Susanna.
Count.
  • Now then, besides your dowry,
  • This ring take, and believe me,
  • Who never can deceive thee—
  • My heart, my heart is thine.
Countess.
  • Thanks, thanks unto your lordship;
  • This gift I’ll ne’er resign.
Sus. Fig. }
  • All goes as I expected,
Count. }
  • But still the best’s to come.
Countess.
  • I see their torches gleaming;
  • They seem this way to move.
Count.
  • There, come with me, my angel!
  • We’re safe in yonder grove.
Sus.
  • Oh, poor deluded women,
  • Come and learn to know the truth of men
Fig.
  • Oh, poor deluded husbands,
  • Come, learn the truth of wives.
Countess.
  • But then it looks so lonely.
Count.
  • I like it all the better;
  • ’Twas made for lovers only,—
  • No cause to be afraid.
Countess. }
  • The fox is trapp’d securely now,—
Sus. }
  • The snare was ably laid.
Fig.
  • What treachery! she follows him!
  • ’Tis certain I’m betray’d.
  • [Figaro passes by the Count.
Count.
  • [Sharply.] Who goes there?
Fig.
  • [Gruffly.] Why, ’tis some one.
Countess.
  • Ah, Figaro!—I’m off.
Count.
  • [Pointing to the right-hand pavilion.]
  • Yes, go; I’ll follow—I’ll follow soon.
  • [She goes into the pavilion, and he retires into the back ground.
Fig.
  • [Alone.] So, again all’s quiet now.
  • Your time is come, my Venus dear;—
  • A second Vulcan I am here,
  • Bearing my honors on my brow,
  • And anger at my heart.
Sus.
  • [Coming forward, and speaking in a feigned voice.]
  • Hush, Figaro; be quiet.
Fig.
  • Ho, ho! here then’s the Countess!
  • You come most opportunely;—
  • I scarce can speak for fury;—
  • Susanna is with his lordship;
  • Edition: current; Page: [39]
  • But you shall see, my lady,
  • And judge then for yourself.
Sus.
  • But only speak more softly—
  • [Forgetting herself, and with altered veice.
  • I stir not hence till I have been vindicated;—
  • No—I stir not hence—no, no!
Fig.
  • [Aside.] Susanna! [Aloud.] Vindicated?
Sus.
  • Yes.
Fig.
  • Really! how can it be effected?
Sus.
  • I’ll be no more suspected;
  • I well know what to do.
Fig.
  • The plot, it seems, is thickening;
  • And I must help it, too.
  • Peace between us, my charmer, I pray you;
  • Why, these tones by their sweetness betray you;
  • Yes, I knew you long since by the voice.

Enter the Count.

Count.
  • She has vanish’d—I seek to no purpose.
Fig. Sus.
  • Hush! be silent—the Count, I’m certain.
Count.
  • Wist! Susanna—Susanna, where are you?
Sus.
  • Famous! mark, he has not recognized her.
Fig.
  • Whom?
Sus.
  • The Countess!
Fig.
  • The Countess?
Sus.
  • The Countess!
Fig. }
  • On our plot we’ll soon let fall the curtain;
Sus. }
  • Oh, how foolish his lordship will look!
Fig.
  • [Kneeling to Susanna.]
  • Ah, I love you, past all expression!
Count.
  • ’Tis the Countess! S’death! I’m here all unarm’d, too.
Fig.
  • May I hope my love with love is answer’d?
Sus.
  • Yes, I’m yours—ah, why deny it?
Count.
  • Ah, the traitors! the traitors!
Fig. }
  • Long I’ve trembled to make this confession;
Sus. }
  • Now I live but, my dearest for thee.
  • [They are going off together, when the Count catches hold of Figaro by the cloak, and Susanna runs into the right-hand pavilion.
Count.
  • Help there—help there, vassals—servants!
Fig.
  • ’Tis his lordship!
Count.
  • Ho! without there—hither, hither!
Fig.
  • All is over!

Enter Basilio, Antonio, Curzio, Bartolo, Servants and Peasants with torches.

Bas. Ant. }
  • What’s the matter?—what’s the matter?
Don C. }
Count.
  • Lo! now the traitor, who so used me,
  • And abused me,
  • Who he is, you plainly see.
Bas. {
  • What confusion!
Don C. {
  • What delusion!
Ant. {
  • No, I’m sure it cannot be.
  • What confusion!
Fig. {
  • What delusion!
  • Oh, it is a treat for me.
  • [The Count rushes into the pavilion, and drags out Cherubino, taking him for the Countess. Barbarina and Marcellina follow.
Count.

At last you’re dotected, no longer suspected;

Those terrors affected avail you no more.

[Discovering that he has got hold of Cherubino.

The Page here?

[Dashes him off, and rushes again into the pavilion.

Ant.

My daughter!

[Barbarina comes forward.

Fig.

My mother!

[The Count returns, dragging in Susanna, who hides her face in her hands.

All.

My lady!

Count.

The plot is discover’d,—

The traitress is there.

Edition: current; Page: [40]
Sus.
  • Forgive me—forgive me!
Count.
  • I’m deaf to your pray’r.
Fig.
  • Forgive—and if ever—
Count.
  • No, never—no, never.
All.
  • Forgiveness! forgiveness!
Count.
  • No, no, no!
  • [The Countess comes from the pavilion, and kneels to the Count with an air of playful malice.
Countess.
  • Will not Susanna’s pray’rs your grace obtain?
Bas. }
  • Amazement! Is this real, or is it ideal?
Ant. }
  • What to believe I do not know,—
Bart. }
  • No, no, no!
Count.
  • [Astonished and confused.]
  • Forgive me, my angel,—
  • Forgive my transgression!
Countess.
  • So frank a confession
  • I answer with, “Yes.”
All.
  • Then love and contentment
  • The bridal will bless!
  • From a maze of wild confusion,
  • Full of doubts and of illusion,
  • Comes domestic peace among us,
  • As from darkness comes the light.
  • Husband and lover, or married or single,
  • Old or young, in pleasure mingle—
  • Mingle with us in the banquet;
  • Into day we’ll turn the night.