Online Library of Liberty

A collection of scholarly works about individual liberty and free markets. A project of Liberty Fund, Inc.

Advanced Search

Ludwig van Beethoven, Beethoven’s Opera Fidelio. German Text, with an English Translation [1805]

1422_tp
Title Page

Edition used:

Ludwig van Beethoven, Beethoven’ s Opera Fidelio. German Text, with an English Translation (Boston: Oliver Ditson, 1864). http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2217

Available in the following formats:
Facsimile PDF 1.75 MB This is a facsimile or image-based PDF made from scans of the original book.
EBook PDF 458 Bytes This text-based PDF or EBook was created from the HTML version of this book and is part of the Portable Library of Liberty.
EBook PDF 1.68 MB This text-based PDF or EBook was created from the HTML version of this book and is part of the Portable Library of Liberty.
HTML 364 KB This version has been converted from the original text. Every effort has been taken to translate the unique features of the printed book into the HTML medium.

About this Title:

Beethoven was one of the great European classical composers of the first part of the 19th century. He was influenced by the Enlightenment and in his only opera, Fidelio, he addressed the problem of individual liberty in a very moving way.

Copyright information:

The text is in the public domain.

Fair use statement:

This material is put online to further the educational goals of Liberty Fund, Inc. Unless otherwise stated in the Copyright Information section above, this material may be used freely for educational and academic purposes. It may not be used in any way for profit.

Table of Contents:

Edition: current; Page: [1]
BEETHOVEN’S OPERA FIDELIO,
containing the GERMAN TEXT, WITH AN ENGLISH TRANSLATION, and The Music of all the Principal Airs.
Boston:
OLIVER DITSON COMPANY
New York:
CHAS. H. DITSON & CO.
Chicago:
LYON & HEALY
Copyright, 1864, by O. Ditson & Co. Copyright, 1892, by Heirs of T. Barker.
Edition: current; Page: [2] Edition: current; Page: [3]

DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.

FLORESTAN. A Spanish Nobleman. TENOR
LEONORA. His Wife, who in her Disguise takes the name of FIDELIO. SOPRANO
DON FERNANDO. Prime Minister of Spain, and friend to Florestan. BASS
PIZARRO. Governor of the Prison, and enemy to Florestan. BASS
ROCCO. Chief Jailer. BASS
MARCELLINA. Daughter of Rocco. SOPRANO
JAQUINO. Assistant to Rocco, in love with Marcellina. TENOR

Prisoners, Guards, Soldiers and People.

the action takes place at a fortress used for the confinement of political offenders, near seville, in spain

ARGUMENT.

Florestan, a noble Spaniard, a valued friend of Fernando, the Prime Minister, had, by his fearless exposure of the misdeeds of Pizarro, awakened the deadly hatred of the latter. This wretch was not without the means of gratifying his malignity. Being appointed the governor of a fortress, used as a place of confinement for political prisoners, he managed to get possession of the person of his enemy, circulated a report of his death, and immured him in the deepest and darkest of the state dungeons. Here the nobleman would have died, had it not been for the faithful love of his wife, Leonora, who did not believe him dead, suspected Pizarro, and finally, in the disguise of a young man, calling herself Fidelio, solicited and received employment from Rocco, head jailer under Pizarro. The youth made rapid headway in the affections of the old man, and also in those of his daughter, Marcellina, who quite neglected her rustic lover, Jaquino, for the gentle and polished stranger. Leonora, although pained at this, felt obliged to encourage the love of the girl, for the sake of her influence over the father; and they together so far prevailed upon him, that he consented to allow Fidelio to go to the more secret portions of the prison. They also begged, for the inmates of the outer cells, the privilege of spending a few hours in the sunshine of the court-yard. The prisoners, naturally, were overjoyed at this indulgence; but, after a short time, were ordered to confinement again by Pizarro, who harshly chided the jailer for his kindness.

Pizarro, just before, had received notice from a friend, that the Prime Minister was on his way to the prison. Should Fernando see Florestan, farewell to revenge. Something must speedily be done to avert the danger. Rocco is commanded to kill and bury the supposed criminal in the inner dungeon. He refuses to kill, but will dig the grave. Pizarro himself will dispatch the victim. Rocco, with Fidelio, accordingly repairs to the gloomy vault, where Florestan is discovered, but sleeping; and so dim is the light, that his agitated wife cannot be sure it is he. The two proceed to clear out an old cistern, which is to be the place of burial. Florestan awakes, and is recognized. Pizarro enters and is about to give the fatal blow, when, with a shriek, Leonora throws herself between the murderer and her husband. Her sudden avowal of her name causes a hesitation on the part of Pizarro, but he again raises the dagger, when he is confronted by a pistol, which points directly at his head. Florestan is saved; for, a moment after, the trumpets signal the arrival of Fernando. Pizarro is summoned to meet him. Rocco brings forth Florestan and his heroic wife, who has the gratification of unlocking and removing his hateful fetters. Other prisoners are released, and the occasion is one of full-measured joy to all, unless we except the jailer’s daughter, who is dismayed at the discovery of the real character and station of the pretty Fidelio. She, however, has the old love to fall back upon.

“Fidelio” was first given in 1805, at the Imperial house at Vienna, but was not at first a favorite. It was revised, and changed to its present form, and reintroduced to the public in 1814, since which time no opera has been more highly esteemed.

Edition: current; Page: [4]

FIDELIO.

AUFZUG I.

ACT I.

AUFTRITT I.—

Der Hof des Staats-gefängnisses. Im Hintergrund das Hauptthor und ein hohe Wallmauer, über welche [Editor: illegible word] hervorragen. Im geschlossenen Thore selbst ist eine Pforte, die für einzelne Fussgänger geöffnet wird. Neben dem Thore das Stübchen des Pfortners. Die Coulisse den Zuschauern links, stellen die Wohngebäude der Gefangenen vor: alle Fenster sind mit Gittern und die mit Nummern bezeichneten Thüren, mit starken Riegeln versehen. In der vordersten Coulisse ist die Thüre zur Wohnung des Gefangenwärters. Rechts stehen Bäume mit eisernem Getänder eingefasst, welche, nebst einem Gartenthore, den Eingang des Schloss-gartens bezeichnen

Marzelline plättet vohr ihrer Thüre Wasche; Jaquino hält sich mehr bei seiner Thüre und öffnel sie mehreren Personen welche ihm Paquete übergeben, die er in sein Stübchen trägt.

SCENE I.—

The Court-yard of the State Prison. In the background the principal gate: in it a wicket, with a gate to allow Foot-Passengers to pass singly. Near the gate the Lodge of the Porter. The side scene to the left of the Spectator represents the dwellings of the Prisoners. The windows have iron gratings, and the doors, which are numbered, strong bolts. In the front side scene is the door of the Turnkey’s dwelling. To the right, iron palings, which, together with a garden gate, indicate the entrance of the castle garden.

Marcellina discovered, ironing linen before her door; Jacquino attending diligently to his door, which he opens to different Persons, who give him parcels to take into the Lodge.

Duetto.

Jaq.
  • Jetzt, Schätzchen, jetz sind wir allein,
  • Wir können vertraulicht nun plaudern.
Mar.
  • Es wird ja nichts wichtiges seyn;
  • Ich darf bei der Arbeit nicht zaudern.
Jaq.
  • Ein Wörtchen, du Trotzige du.
Mar.
  • So sprich nur! ich höre ja zu.
Jaq.
  • Wenn du mir nicht freundlicher blickest,
  • So bring’ ich kein Wörtchen hervor.
Mar.
  • Wenn du dich nicht in mich schickest,
  • So stopf’ ich mir vollends das Ohr.
Jaq.
  • Ein Weilchen nur höre mir zu,
  • Dann lass ich dich wieder in Ruh.
Mar.
  • So hab’ ich denn nimmermehr Ruh.
  • So rede, so rede nur zu.
Jaq.
  • Ich habe zum Weib dich gewählet—
  • Verstehst du?
Mar.
  • Das ist ja doch klar!
Jaq.
  • Und wenn mir dein Jawort nich fehlet,
  • Was meinst du?
Mar.
  • So sind wir ein Paar.
Jaq.
  • Wir könnten in wenigen Wochen—
Mar.
  • Recht schön! du bestimmst schon die Zeit.
  • [ Es wird gepocht.
Jaq.
  • Zum Henker! das ewige Pochen!
Mar.
  • So bin ich doch endlich befreit! [ Bei seite.
Jaq.
  • Da war ich so herrlich im Gang.
Mar.
  • Wie macht seine Liebe mir bang.
Jaq.
  • Und immer entwischt mir der Fang.
Mar.
  • Wie werden die Stunden mir lang.
  • Ich weiss, dass der Arme sich qualet,
  • Es thut mir so leid auch um ihn;
  • Fidelio hab’ ich gewählet,
  • Ihn lieben ist süsser Gewinn.
Jaq.
  • Wo war ich? Sie sieht mich nich an.
Mar.
  • Da ist er—er fängt wieder an.
Jaq.
  • Wann wirst du das Jawort mir geben?
  • Es könnte ja heute noch seyn.
Mar.
  • O weh! er verbittert mein Leben!
  • Jetzt—morgen—und immer—nein, nein!
Jaq.
  • Du bist aocl wahrhaftig von Stein.
Mar.
  • Ich muss ja so hart mit ihm seyn.
Jaq.
  • Kein Wünschen, kein Bitten geht ein.
Mar.
  • Er hofft bei dem mindesten Schein.
Jaq.
  • So wirst du dich nimmer bekehren?
  • Was meinst du?
Mar.
  • Du könntest nun gehn.
Jaq.
  • Wie? dich anzusehn willst du mir wehren?
  • Auch das noch?
Mar.
  • So bleibe hier stehn.
Jaq.
  • Du hast mir so oft doch versprochen—
Mar.
  • Versprochen? Nein! das geht zu weit!
  • [ Es wird on dir Thüre gepocht.
Jaq.
  • Zum Henker! das ewige Pochen!
Mar.
  • So bin ich doch endlich befreit.
Jaq.
  • Es ward ihr im Ernste schon bang,
Mar.
  • Das war ein willkommener Klang
Jaq.
  • Wer weiss ob es mir nicht gelang?
Mar.
  • Es wurde zu Tode mir bang.
Jaq.

Wenn ich diese Thüre heute nicht schon zweihundert Mal geöffnet habe, so will ich nicht Caspar Eustaco Jaquino heissen. [ Zu Marzelline. ] Endlich kann ich doch einmal wieder plaudern. [ Es wird gepocht. ] Zum Wetter! schon wieder!

[ Er geht, um zu offnen.

Mar.

Was kann ich dafür, dass ich ihn nicht mehr so gerne haben kann, wie sonst?

Jaq.

[ Zu dem der gepocht hat, indem er hastig zuschliesst. ] Ich werde es besorgen, schon recht! [ Vorgehend zu Marzelline. ] Nun hoffe ich soll Niemand uns stören.

Roh.

[ ruft hinter der Scene. ] Jaquino! Jaquino!

Mar.

Hörst du! der Vater ruft.

Jaq.

Lassen wir ihn ein wenig warten. Also wieder auf unsere Liebe zu kommen—

Mar.

So geh doch! der Vater wird sich nach Fidelio erkundigen wollen.

Jaq.

[ eifersüchtig. ] Ei, freilich! da kann man nicht schnell genug seyn.

Roh.

[ ruft weider. ] Jaquino! hörst du nicht?

Jaq.

[ schreiend. ] Ich komme schon! [ Zu Marzelline. ] Bleib’ fein hier; in zwei Minuten sind wir wieder beisammen.

[ Geht ab in den Garten.

Duet.

Jac.
  • At last, my idol, we are alone,
  • And can have a pleasant chat together.
Mar.
  • Well, speak away, but don’t hinder me:
  • I have my work to do you know.
Jac.
  • A word with thee—just a word.
Mar.
  • Go on; I’m listening.
Jac.
  • But, at least, do not be cross with me,
  • Or I shall not be able to say a word.
Mar.
  • Well, and when you do speak
  • I shall, perhaps, close my ears.
Jac.
  • Only listen for a few moments,
  • And then I’ll leave you in peace.
Mar.
  • You are always tormenting me;—
  • I listen,—speak on.
Jac.
  • I have chosen you for my wife—
  • Do you understand?
Mar.
  • Yes, that’s plain enough!
Jac.
  • And if thou would’st only say yes,
  • What then?
Mar.
  • Why, then we should make a pair.
Jac.
  • In a week or two, we could—
Mar.
  • Well done! you are fixing an early time certainly.
  • [ A knocking is heard.
Jac.
  • The dence! that eternal knocking!
Mar.
  • For the present I am saved. [ Aside.
Jac.
  • I was just getting on the right track.
Mar.
  • How uneasy his love makes me.
Jac.
  • But the prize always escapes me.
Mar.
  • How slowly the time seems to pass.
  • I know this poor fellow suffers,
  • And I am right sorry for him;
  • But Fidelio has my heart,
  • And his love is the only treasure I value.
Jac.
  • Where was I? She turns her back upon me.
Mar.
  • There he is—going on again.
Jac.
  • Oh, when will you say to me Yes
  • Why not do so to-day?
Mar.
  • Oh, woe’s me! he’s a constant torment!
  • Once for all and for ever, I say no, no!
Edition: current; Page: [5]
Jac.
  • Then you must have a heart of stone
Mar.
  • [ Aside. ] I must be harsh with him.
Jac.
  • Will neither vows nor prayers move you?
Mar.
  • The least giving way on my part makes him hope.
Jac.
  • Wilt thou never relent?
  • Speak—what sayest thou?
Mar.
  • That thou may’st go.
Jac.
  • What! must I even quit thy sight?
  • May I not even look on thee?
Mar.
  • Well, stay, and stand there, then.
Jac.
  • But think how often you have promised—
Mar.
  • Promised? No! that’s saving too much!
  • [ Knocking again at the door.
Jac.
  • The deuce! that eternal knocking!
Mar.
  • At last I shall be left at peace.
Jac.
  • She begins to relent a little, I think.
Mar.
  • [ Aside. ] Oh, what a welcome sound!
Jac.
  • Perhaps if I try once more I may succeed.
Mar.
  • I am nearly dead with anxiety
Jac.

If I have not answered that door two hundred times at least to-day, my name’s not Caspar Eustache Jacquino. [ To Marcellina. ] At last we are at liberty to speak freely. [ Knocking. ] The deuce! again so soon!

[ He goes to open the door.

Mar.

What shall I do? I cannot even love him as I used.

Jac.

[ To the person who has knocked, and shutting the door petulently. ] That will do; I will attend. [ Turning towards Marcellina. ] Now I hope we shall have no more disturbers.

Roc.

[ Calling from behind. ] Jacquino! Jacquino!

Mar.

Do you not hear? my father calls.

Jac.

Well, let him wait a bit, while we finish our love affairs.

Mar.

No, no; go! Father may be wishing to enquire after Fidelio.

Jac.

[ Jealously. ] Oh, truly! and in that case one cannot be too quick.

Roc.

[ Calling again. ] Jacquino! dost thou not hear me?

Jac.

[ Loudly. ] Coming! [ To Marcellina. ] Do not go now, I pray thee—in two minutes I shall be back again.

[ Exit into the garden.

AUFTRITT II.— : Marzelline, allein.

Mar.

Der arme Jaquino dauert mich beinahe. Aus dem Mitleiden, das ich mit Jaquino habe, merke ich erst, wei sehr gut ich Fidelio bin. Ich glaube auch, dass Fidelio mir recht gut ist, und wenn ich die Gesinnungen des Vaters wüsste, so könnte bald mein Glück vollkommen werden.

SCENE II.— : Marcellina, alone.

Mar.

I cannot but feel for poor Jacquino. From my compassion for him I learn how dearly I love Fidelio, and he equally loves me, I hope. How soon might my happiness be complete, if my father were not against our union.

Aria.

Mar.
  • O wär’ ich schon mit dir vereint,
  • Und dürfte Mann dich nennen!
  • Ein Mädchen darf ja, was es meint,
  • Zur Hälfte nur bekennen.
  • Doch wenn ich nicht erröthen muss,
  • Ob einem warmen Herzenskuss,
  • Wenn nichts uns stört au Erden,
  • Die Hoffnung schon erfüllt die Brust
  • Mit unaussprechlich süsser Lust!
  • Wie glücklich will ich werden.
  • In Ruhe stiller Häuslichkeit,
  • Erwach ich jeden Morgen;
  • Wir grüssen uns mit Zärtlichkeit,
  • Der Fleiss verscheucht die Sorgen.
  • Und ist die Arbeit abgethan,
  • Dann schleicht die holde Nacht heran,
  • Dann ruh’n wir von Beschwerden.
  • Die Hoffnung schon erfüllt die Brust
  • Mit unaussprechlich süsser Lust!
  • Wie glücklich will ich werden!

Air.

Mar.
    • If the truth my heart doth tell,
    • Very soon a bride I’ll be;
    • The impulse pure with love to dwell,
    • The heart’s law is to me;
    • But for a little time, at least,
    • I my feelings must suppress;—
    • Delay most cruel!
    • Why throbs my heart within my breast?
    • Oh, come, and give thy soothing rest,
    • Hope, brightest jewel!
    • Ah! what pleasure, what delight,
    • Shall I with my lover know!
    • Light are all the cares of life
    • When those we love partake our woe!
Edition: current; Page: [6]

AUFTRITT III.— : Marzelline, Rokko, Jaquino, trägt Gartenwerkzeuge in Rokko’s Haus.

Rok.

Guten Tag, Marcelline! Ist Fidelio noch nicht rurückgekommen?

Mar.

Nein, Vater!

Rok.

Die Stunde naht, wo ich dem Gouverneur die Briefschaften bringen muss, die Fidelo abholen sollte. Ich erwarte ihn mit Ungeduld.

[ Es wird geklopft.

Jaq.

[ hommt aus Rokkos Hause. ] Ich komme schon! Ich komme schon!

[ Läuft um aufzuschliessen.

Mar.

Er wird gewiss so lange bei dem Schmiede haben worten müssen. [ Sie hat während dessen Leonoren zur Thüre hereinkommen sehen. ] Da ist er ja! Da ist er!

SCENE III.— : Marcellina, Rocco, Jacquino, carrying garden implements into Rocco’s House.

Roc.

Good day, Marcellina! Has Fidelio not yet returned?

Mar.

No, father!

Roc.

The hour is at hand when I ought to deliver to the Governor the packet of letters that Fidelio was to fetch.

[ Knocking.

Jac.

[ Coming out of Rocco’s House. ] Coming, coming!

[ Runs to unlock the door.

Mar.

Perhaps he has been obliged to wait at the smith’s. [ In the mean time seeing Leonora at the door. ] Why, here he is, here he is!

AUFTRITT IV.— : Vorige Leonore, a/s Fidelio. Sie trägt ein Behältniss mit Lebensmitteln, auf dem Arme, Ketten, die sie beim Eintreten an dem Stübchen des Pförtners ablegt; an der Seite hängt ihr eine blecherne Blüchse an einer Schnur.

Mar.

[ auf Leonore zulaufend. ] Wie er belastet ist. Liebe Gott! Der Schweiss läuft ihm von der Stirne.

[ Sie nimmt ihr Sacktuch und versucht ihr das Gesicht abzutrocknen.

Rok.

Warte! warte!

[ Er hilft mit Marzellinen, ihr das Behältniss vom Rücken zu nehmen.

Jaq.

[ bie Seite. ] Es war auch wohl der Mühe werth, so schnell zu laufen, um den Patron da hereinzulassen.

[ Geht in sein Stübchen, kommt aber bald wieder heraus, macht den Beschäftigten, sucht aber eigentlich die Uebrigen zu beobachten

Rok.

Armer Fidelio,—diesmal hast du dir zu viel aufgeladen

Leo.

[ vorgehend und sich das Gesicht abwischend. ] Ich muss gestehen, ich ben ein wenig ermüdet.

Rok.

Wieviel kostet Alles zusammen?

Leo.

Zwölf Piaster ohngefähr. Hier ist die genaue Rechnung.

Rok.

[ durchseiht die Rechnung. ] Gut! brav! zum Wetter! Da giebt es Artikel, auf die man wenigstens das Doppelte profitiren kann. Du bist ein kluger Junge! [ bei Seite. ] Der Schelm giebt sich alle diese Mühe offenbar meiner Marzelline wegen

Leo.

Ich suche zu thun, was mir möglich ist.

Rok.

Ja, ja! Du bist brav! Ich habe dich aber auch mit jedem Tage lieber; und sey versichert, dein Lohn soll nicht ausbleiben.

[ Er wirft während der letztern Worte wechselnde Blicke auf Leonoren und Marzellinen

Leo.

[ verlegen. ] O glaubt nicht, dass ich meine Schuldigkeit nur des Lohnes wegen—

Rok.

Still! [ mit Blicken wie vorher. ] Meinst du ich kann dir nicht ins Herz schen?

[ Er scheint sich an der zunehmenden Verlegenheit Leonorens zu weiden und geht dann bei Seite, die Ketten zu besehen. Marzelline hat bei dem Lobe, sie mit immer steigender Bewegung hebevoll betrachtet.

SCENE IV.— : Enter Leonora, as Fidelio. She carries a basket with provisions, and on her arm fetters, which she deposits on the ground. At her side a tin box hangs by a ribbon.

Mar.

[ Running to Leonora ] How he is laden! Good heavens! the perspiration streams from his forehead.

[ She tries, with her handkerchief, to dry Leonora’s face.

Roc.

Oh, stay, stay!

[ He helps, with Marcellina, to remove the basket from her back.

Jac.

[ Aside. ] It was worth the trouble, certainly, to run so quickly to let my gentleman in!

[ Goes into his Lodge, but soon comes out again; pretends to be busy, but is in fact watching the others.

Roc.

My poor Fidelio! this time thou hast somewhat overladen thy-elf.

Leo.

[ Advancing, and wiping her face. ] I must confess I am a little wearied.

Roc.

How much have these things cost?

Leo.

About twelve piastres; here is the account.

Roc.

[ Looking through the account. ] Good! capital! By all that’s good, here are articles by which we shall at least make cent per cent. [ Aside. ] The rogue plainly gives himself all this trouble on account of my Marcellina.

Leo.

I wish to do all I can.

Roc.

Yes, yes, thou’rt a good fellow! I like thee better and better, and be assured thou shalt meet thy reward.

He casts, during the last words, alternate glances at Leonora and Marcellina.

Leo.

[ Embarrassed. ] Oh! believe not that I do my duty from interested motives

Roc.

[ With glances as before. ] Hush! think’st thou I cannot see into thy heart?

[ He appears to enjoy the increasing embarrassment of Leonora, and then goes aside to look at the fetters. Meanwhile Marcellina regards Leonora lovingly, and with increasing emotion..

lf1422_figure_001.jpg
Edition: current; Page: [7]
lf1422_figure_002.jpg

MIR IST SO WUNDERBAR —MY HEART AND HAND. Marcellina, Leorora, Rocco and Jacquino

Edition: current; Page: [8]
Jaq.
  • Der Vater willigt ein,
  • Mir wird so wunderbar,
  • Mir fällt kein Mittel ein.

[ Nach dem Canon geht Jaquino in seine Stube Zurück.

Rok.

Höre, Fidelio, wenn ich auch nicht weiss, wem du angehörst, so weiss ich doch, was ich thue; ich—ich mache dich zu meinem Tochtermann.

Mar.

Wirst du es bald thun, Vater?

Rok.

Ei, ei, wie eilfertig! [ ernst. ] Sobald der Gouverneur nach Sevilla gereis’t seyn wird, dann geb’ ich Euch zusammen: darauf könnt Ihr rechnen.

Mar.

Den Tag nach seiner Abreise? Das machst du recht vernünftig, lieber Vater.

Leo.

[ Schon vorher sehr betreten, aber jetzt sich freudig stellend. ] Den Tag nach seiner Arbreise? [ Bei Seite. ] O, welche neue Verlegenheit!

Rok.

Nun, meine Kinder, Ihr habt Euch doch herzlich lieb, nicht wahr?—Aber das ist noch nicht Alles was zu einer vegnügten Haushaltung gehört, man braucht auch—

[ Macht die Pantomime des Geldzählens.

Jac.
  • They Rocco’s blessing share,
  • What wondrous things, and strange,
  • A lover thus t’ exchange!

[ After this Canon Jacquino goes back to his house.

Roc.

Well, my good Fidelio, if I do not know who thou art, yet I know what I will do: I—I’ll make thee my son-in-law.

Mar.

Wilt thou?—Soon, my father?

Roc.

Oh, oh, what a hurry! As soon as the Governor has set out for Seville I will unite you; on that you may depend.

Mar.

The day after his departure, say you? Dear father, thou art quite right.

Leo.

[ Much embarrassed, but soon assuming a joyful air. ] The day after his departure? [ Aside. ] What new troubles have I to encounter?

Roc.

Now, my children, you love each other truly;—do I not see it? But love is not the only thing wanted to make housekeeping agreeable: there is also wanted—

[ Moving his hands as if counting money.

Arie.

  • Hat man nicht auch Geld daneben,
  • Kann man nicht ganz glücklich seyn.
  • Traurig schleppt sich fort das Leben;
  • Mancher Kummer stellt sich ein.
  • Doch wenn’s in den Taschen fein klingelt und rollt,
  • Da hält man das Schicksal gefangen.
  • Und Macht und Liebe verschafft dir das Gold,
  • Und stillet das kühnste Verlangen.
  • Das Glück dient wie ein Knecht für Sold;
  • Es ist ein schönes Ding das Gold!

Air.

  • If we have not gold to fly to,
  • We can ne’er be happy quite;
  • But if clouds of sorrow lower,
  • Gold will help to make them bright.
  • With gold in our pockets we face all mankind;
  • The sound has a magical power:
  • We aye shall a welcome in ev’ry place find
  • If we tender this magical dower.
  • True happiness, so we are told,
  • Is best secured by glorious gold.
lf1422_figure_003.jpg

WENN SICH NICHTS MIT NICHTS VERBINDET —NOTHING, IF YOU ADD TO NOTHING Air. Rocco.

Leo.

Ihr könnt das leicht sagen. Meister Rokko. Freilich giebt es noch etwas, was mir nicht minder kostbar seyn würde; aber mit Kummer sehe ich, dass ich es durch alle miene Bemühungen nicht erhalten werde.

Rok.

Und was wäre denn das?

Leo.

Euer Vertrauen. Verzeiht mir den Vorwurf, aber oft sehe ich Euch aus den unterirdischen Gewölben dieses Schlosses ganz ausser Athem und ermattet zurückkommen. Warum erlaubt Ihr mir nicht Euch dahin zu begleiten. Es wäre mir sehr lieb, wenn ich Euch bei Eurer Arbeit helfen und Eure Beschwerden theilen könnte.

Rok.

Du weisst doch, dass ich den strengtsten Befehl habe, Niemanden, wer’s auch sey, zu den Staats-Gefangenen zu lassen.

Mar.

Es sind ihrer aber gar zu viele in dieser Festung. Du arbeitest dich ja zu Tode, liebe Vater.

Leo.

Sie hat recht, Meister Rokko. Man soll allerdings seine Pflicht thun, [ zärtlich ] aber ist doch auch erlaubt, mein ich, zuweilen daran zu denken, wie man sich für die, welche uns angehören und lieben, ein Bischen schonen kann.

[ Sie ergreift seine Hand.

Mar.

[ Rokkos andere Hand an die Brust drückend. ] Man muss sich für seine Kinder zu erhalten suchen.

Rok.

[ sieht Beide gerührt an. ] Ja, Ihr abt recht! Diese schwere Arbeit würde mir doch endlich zu viel werden. Der Gouverneur ist zwar sehr streng; er muss mir aber doch erlauben, dich in die geheimen Kerker mit mir zu nehmen.

[ Leonora äussert eine heftige Geberde der Freude.

Indessen giebst es ein Gewölbe, in das ich dich wohl nie werde einführen dürfen, obschon ich mich ganz auf dich verlassen kann.

Mar.

Verrumthlich wo der Gefangene sitzt, von dem du schon einigemal gesprochen hast, Vater.

Rok.

Du hast’s errathen.

Leo.

[ forschend. ] Ich glaube, es ist schon lange her, dass er gefangen ist?

Rok.

Es ist schon über zwei Jahr.

Leo.

[ heftig. ] Zwei Jahr, sagt Ihr? [ Sich fassend. ] Er muss ein grosser Verbrecher seyn.

Rok.

Oder er muss grosse Feinde haben: dieses kommt ohngefähr auf eins heraus.

Mar.

So hat man denn nie erfahren können, woher er ist und wie er heisst?

Rok.

O wie oft hat er mit mir von Alle dem sprechen wollen!

Leo.

Nun?—

Rok.

Für Unsereinen ist’s aber am besten, so wenig Geheimnisse, als möglich zu wissen. [ Geheimnissvoll. ] Nun, er wird mich nicht lange mehr quälen, es kann nicht mehr lange mit ihm dauern.

Leo.

[ bei Seite. ] Grosser Gott!

Mar.

O lieber Vater, führe Fidelio ja nicht zu ihm; diesen Anblick könnte er nicht ertragen.

Leo.

Warum denn nicht? Ich habe Muth und Stärke.

Rok.

[ sie auf die Schulter klopfend. ] Brav! mein Sohn! brav! Wenn ich dir erzählen wollte, wie ich anfangs in meinem Stande mit meinem Herzen zu kämpfen hatte,—und ich war doch ein ganz anderer Kerl als du, mit deiner feinen Haut und deinen weichen Händer

Edition: current; Page: [9]
Leo.

It is right enough in you to say this, Master Rocco. But there is something else more precious in my esteem, which with sorrow I perceive all my exertions cannot gain.

Roc.

And what is that?

Leo.

Your confidence. Pardon me the reproach, but I often see you return quite out of breath from the subterranean vaults of the castle. Why do you not allow me to accompany you? It would be delightful to me if I could go with you, and share your toils.

Roc.

But thou knowest the strict orders imposed on me. I am not permitted to allow access to any one of the state prisoners.

Mar.

But there are far too many of them in this fortress. And, dear father, you will work yourself dead.

Leo.

She is right, Master Rocco. One must certainly do one’s duty, [ tenderly, ] but it is allowable, I believe, to spare oneself a little for those who belong to us and love us.

[ Grasping his hand.

Mar.

[ Pressing Rocco’s other hand. ] One must try, for the sake of one’s children.

Roc.

[ Affected, looking at them both. ] Well said, my children: this hard work is becoming over much for me. The Governor, it is true, is very strict; but he must allow me to take you with me into the secret dungeons.

[ Leonora manifests a lively expression of joy.

There is one dungeon, however, Fidelio, into which I must not take you.

Mar.

Probably it is there the prisoner is confined of whom thou hast so often spoken, father?

Roc.

Thou hast guessed it.

Leo.

[ Inquiringly. ] I think he has been a long time imprisoned?

Roc.

Somewhat more than two years.

Leo.

[ Impetuously. ] Two years, do you say? [ Collecting herself. ] He must be a great criminal, then?

Roc.

Or—he must have great enemies: that amounts to the same thing.

Mar.

Is no one able to tell his name, or whence he comes?

Roe.

Oh! how often has he wished to speak with me of all that!

Leo.

Well?

Roc.

For people in our position, it is best to know as few secrets as possible. [ Mysteriously. ] However, he will not trouble me much more—he cannot last much longer.

Leo.

[ Aside. ] Great God!

Mar.

Do not take Fidelio to him, father dear: it is a sight he could not bear.

Leo.

Oh! fear me not. Doubt not my courage or my strength.

Roc.

[ Tapping her on the shoulder. ] Bravo! very fine! If I were to tell thee how I had to struggle with my heart in my early days, I should make thee weep; and I was quite a different fellow from thee, with thy soft skin and delicate hands.

Terzetto.

Rok.
  • Gut, Söhnchen, gut!
  • Hab’ immer Muth,
  • Dann wird dir’s auch gelingen
  • Das Herz wird hart
  • Durch Gegenwart
  • Bei fürchterlichen Dingen.
Leo.
  • Ich habe Muth
  • Mit kaltem Blut
  • Will ich hinab mich wagen.
  • Für hohen Lohn
  • Kann Liebe schon
  • Auch hohe Leiden tragen.
Mar.
  • Dein gutes Herz
  • Wird manchen schmerz
  • In diesen Gruften leiden;
  • Dann kehrt zuruck
  • Der Liebe Glück,
  • Und unnennbare Freuden.
Rok.
  • Du wirst dein Glück ganz sicher bau’n.
Leo.
  • Ich hab’ auf Gott und Recht Vertrau’n
Mar.
  • Du darfst mir auch ins Auge schau’n;
  • Der Liebe Macht ist auch nicht klein
Alle drei.
  • Ja, ja, wir werden glücklich seyn.
Rok.
  • Der Gouverneur soll heut’ erlauben,
  • Das du mit mir die Arbeit theilst.
Leo.
  • Du wirst mir alle Ruhe rauben,
  • Wenn du bis morgen nur verweilst.
Mar.
  • Ja, guter Vater, bitt’ ihn heute,
  • In Kurzem sind wir dann ein Paar.
Rok.
  • Ich bin ja bald des Grabes Beute.
Leo.
  • Wie lang bin ich des Kummers Beute.
Rok.
  • Ich brauche Hülf’, es ist ja wahr.
Leo.
  • Du, Hoffnung, reichst mir Labung dar.
Mar.
  • Ach, lieber Vater, was fällt Euch ein?
  • Lang’ Freund und Rather müsst Ihr uns seyn.
Rok.
  • Nur auf der huth,
  • Dann geht es gut,
  • Gestillt wird Euer Sehnen.
Mar.
  • O, habe Muth,
  • O, welche Gluth!
  • O, welch’ ein tiefes Sehnen.
Leo.
  • Ihr seyd so gut,
  • Ihr macht mir Muth,
  • Gestillt wird bald mein Sehnen.
Rok.
  • Gebt Euch die Hand,
  • Und schliesst das Band
Leo.
  • Ich gab die Hand
  • Zum süssen Band.
Mar.
  • Ein festes Band
  • Mit Herz und Hand
Rok.
  • In süssen Freudenthränen.
Leo.
  • Es kostet bittre Thränen.
Mar.
  • O, süsse, süsse Thränen.
Rok.
  • Aber nun ist es auch Zeit, dass ich dem
  • Gouverneur die Briefschaften überbringe.

Terzett.

Roc.
  • Courage! be firm! and of your vigor
  • A proof you very soon shall show.
  • Time your gentle heart will harden:
  • It changes all things here below.
Leo.
  • Trust in me: I will obey you. [ Aside.
  • Entering yonder dungeon dread,
  • Edition: current; Page: [10]
  • Love will dictate what to do,
  • Love will banish ev’ry fear.
Mar.
  • Those dreadful places, full of horror,
  • I fear me much will make thee quail;
  • But the sweets of love ethereal,
  • On returning, thou wilt hail.
Roc.
  • Thy happiness thou wilt secure.
Leo.
  • In Heaven and my right I place my trust
Mar.
  • Yes, fate propitiously will smile,
  • And love sustain thy actions just.
All.

Yes, yes, love will sustain thee. me.

Roc.
  • The Governor will not refuse
  • That thou with me the labor share.
Leo.
  • Ah! Heaven will assist the just;—
  • But do not longer delay me.
Mar.
  • Yes, good father, entreat the Governor to-day,
  • That we may the sooner be united.
Roc.
  • I shall soon go down to my grave.
Leo.
  • How long have I endured this agony.
Roc.
  • Yes, I need assistance truly.
Leo.
  • But Providence sends me a gleam of hope.
Mar.
  • Ah, dear father, do not despond;
  • You will, I hope, live long with us,
  • To comfort and protect.
Roc.
  • Be only on your guard, then all will go well,
  • And the wishes of all be gratified
Mar.
  • Oh yes,—have courage;
  • What anxiety he now displays—
  • What animation!
Leo.
  • You are both so kind,
  • You encourage me to hope everything—
  • My wish, I trust, will soon be gratified.
Roc.
  • Now join your hands,
  • And sanctify the tender knot with tears of joy.
Leo.
  • I have given my sacred pledge—
  • Ah! what bitter tears it cost me.
Mar.
  • A lasting tie, with hand and heart—
  • Oh! sweet and welcome tears.
Roc.
  • In sweet tears of joy.
Leo.
  • It costs bitter tears
Mar.
  • Oh! sweet, sweet tears.
Roc.
  • ’Tis time that I deliver up
  • These letters and despatches.

Marsch.

Rok.

O, er kommt selbst hierher. [ Zu Leonore. ] Gieb sie, Fidelio. und dann entfernt Euch.

[ Leonore nimmt die an einem Bande hängende Blechbüchse, giebt sie Rokko, und geht dann mit Marcellinen in das Haus ab.

March.

Roc.

Behold! he approaches. [ To Leonora. ] Give them to me, and depart.

[ Leonora gives the tin box to Rocco, and then goes with Marcellina into the house.

AUFTRITT V.— : Rokko, Pizarro, Offiziere, Wachen. Während des Marsches wird das Hauptthor durch Wachen von Aussen geöffaet. Offiziere mit einem Detachement treten ein, dann Pizarro. Das Hauptthor wird wieder geschlossen.

Piz.

[ Zu dem Offizier. ] Drei Mann Wache auf den Wall, sechs Mann Tag und Nacht an der Zugbrücke, eben so viel gegen den Garten zu; und Jedermann, der sich dem Graben nähert, werde sogleich vor mich gebracht. [ Zu Rokko. ] Rokko, ist etwas Neues vorgefallen?

Rok.

Nein, Herr!

Piz.

Wo sind die Despeschen?

Rok.

[ nimmt Briefe aus der Blechbüchse. ] Hier sind sie.

Piz.

[ öffnet die Papiere und durchsieht sie. ] Immer Emptehlungen und Vorwürfe. Wenn ich auf Alles das achten wollte, würde ich nie damit fertig werden. [ Hält bei einem Briefe an. ] Was seh’ ich? Mich dünkt, ich kenne diese Schrift. Lass sehen.

[ Er öffnet den Brief, geht weiter vor. Rokko und die Wachen ziehen sich zurück. Lies’t.

“Iche gebe Ihnen Nachricht, dass der Minister in Erfahrung gebracht hat, dass die Staats-Gefängnisse denen Sie vorstehen, mehrere Opfer willkührlicher Gewalt enthalten. Er reis’t morgen ab, um Sie mit einer Untersuchung zu überiaschen. Seyn Sie auf Ihrer Huth, und suchen Sie sich sicher zu stellen.”

[ Betreten. ] Ach, wenn er entdeckte, dass ich diesen Florestan in Ketten liegen habe, den er längst todt glaubt. Eine kühne That kann alle Besorgnisse zerstreuen.

SCENE V.— : Rocco, Pizarro, Officers, Guards.—During the March, the principal door is opened from without. Officers enter with a detachment of Troops, then Pizarro. The gate is shut again.

Piz.

[ To the Officer. ] Three guards on the wall, on the draw-bridge six, day and night, as many within the garden; and every one that approaches the trench, let him be brought before me. [ To Rocco. ] Has anything fresh occurred?

Roc.

No, signor.

Piz.

Where are the despatches?

Roc.

Here they are.

[ Takes letters out of the tin box.

Piz.

[ Opens the papers, and looks through them. ] More recommendations! more reproaches! were I to attend to Edition: current; Page: [11] these things, I should never be at rest. Ah! what do I see? methinks I know this hand—let’s see.

[ He opens the letter and advances. Rocco and the Guards recede.—Reads.

“I give you information that the Minister has learned that the state prisons over which you preside contain several victims of arbitrary power. He sets out to-morrow to surprise you. Be on your guard, and endeavor to keep yourself right.”

Ah! if he discover that I have this Florestan lying in chains, whom he thinks dead long since! A bold deed can—and shall—dissipate all my anxieties!

Aria.

  • Ha! welch ein Augenblick!
  • Die rache werd’ ich kühlen,
  • Dich rufet dein Geschick!
  • In seinem Herzen wühlen—
  • O Wonne, hohes Glück!
  • Schon war ich nah dem Staube,
  • Dem lauten Spott zum Raube,
  • Dahin gestreckt zu seyn.
  • Nun ist es mir geworden,
  • Den mörder selbst zu morden.
  • In seiner letzten Stunde,
  • Den Stahl in seiner Wunde,
  • Ihm noch ins Ohr zu schrein:
  • Triumph! des Sieg ist mein!
Die Wache.
  • [ halblaut unter sich. ]
  • Er spricht von Tod und Wunde—
  • Wach scharf auf Eure Runde.
  • Wie wichtig muss es seyn.
Piz.

Hauptmann! [ Er führt den Hauptmann vor und spricht leise mit ihm. ] Besteigen Sie mit einem Trompeter den Thurm; sehen Sie mit der grössten Achtsamkeit auf die Strasse von Sevilla; sobald Sie einen Wagen, von Reitern umgeben, gewahr werden, geben Sie augenblicklich ein Zeichen. Verstehen Sie? augenblicklich! Ich erwarte die grösste Pünktlichkeit; Sie haften mir mit Ihrem Kopfe dafur.

[ Hauptmann ab.

[ zur Wache. ] Fort auf Eure Posten!

[ Die Wache geht.

Rokko!

Rok.

Herr.

Piz.

[ betrachtet ihn eine Weile aufmerksam, für sich. ] Ich muss ihn zu gewinnen suchen; ohne seine Hülfe kann ich es nicht ausführen. Komm näher!

Air.

  • Ah! the moment has arriv’d
  • My revenge I will assuage
  • For the outrage suffer’d:
  • I will give him, very soon,
  • A sample of my pity.
  • Fearlessly, unsparingly,
  • I will tear his heart from out him!
  • The wretch shall quickly repent
  • His daring resistance to me;—
  • I would sooner die than yield.
  • Now that he is in my power,
  • Punishment for his treason
  • Shall quickly be his lot.
  • Ah! my heart beats more freely
  • At the prospect of revenge!
  • No more hope is there for thee.
  • The moment is approaching
  • For thy dire punishment.
Guards.
  • [ In an under-tone. ] He speaks of death and wounds;
  • He is expecting somebody.
  • Let us go quickly,
  • And watch closely on our rounds.
Piz.

[ To the Officer, speaking in a low voice. ] Captain, take with you the trumpeter, and ascend the tower: there look out along the road to Seville. As soon as you see a cavalier with noble escort, give instantly a signal. Away! and mind your orders! Neglect them, and your head shall be the forfeit.

[ Exit Captain.

Away! [ To the guards. ] Every one to his post.

[ Exeunt.

Rocco!

Roc.

Signor.

Piz.

[ Looking at him steadfastly for a short time.—Aside. ] ’Tis useless to hesitate—without his aid I shall never accomplish my object. Rocco, come nearer.

Duetto.

  • Jetzt, Alter, hat es Eile;
  • Dir wird ein Glück zu Theile
  • Du wirst ein reicher Mann
  • [ Er wirft ihm einen Beutel zu.
  • Das geb’ ich nur daran.
Rok.
  • So saget nur in Eile,
  • Wohin ich dienen kann.
Piz.
  • Du bist von kaltem Blute,
  • Von unverzagtem Muthe,
  • Durch langen Dienst geworden.
Rok.
  • Was soll ich, redet—
Piz.
  • Morden!
Rok. [ erschrickt. ]
  • Wie?
Piz.
  • Höre mich nur an:
  • Du bebst? bist du ein Mann?
  • Wir durfen nicht mehr säumen
  • Dem Staate liegt daran,
  • Den bösen Unterthan
  • Schnell aus dem Weg zu räumen.
Rok.
  • O Herr!
Piz.
  • Du stehst noch an? [ Für sich.
  • Er darf nicht länger leben,
  • Sonst ist’s um mich geschehn.
  • Pizarro sollte beben!
  • Du fällst, ich werde stehen.
Rok.
  • Die Glieder fühl’ ich beben,
  • Wie konnt’ ich das bestehen?
  • Ich nehm’ ihm nicht das Leben,
  • Mag, was da will, geschehen.
  • Mein Herr, das Leben nehmen,
  • Das ist nicht meine Pflicht.
Piz.
  • Ich will micht selbst bequemen,
  • Wenn dir’s an Muth gebricht.
  • Nur eile, rash und munter
  • Zu jenem Mann hinunter
  • Du weisst—
Rok.
  • Der kaum mehr lebet,
  • Und wie ein Schatten schwebet.
Piz.
  • [ mit Grimm. ] Zu dem, zu dem hinab—
  • Ich wart’ in kleiner Ferne,
  • Du gräbst in der Cisterne
  • Sehr schnell für ihn ein Grab.
Rok.
  • Und denn?
Piz.
  • Du giebst ein Zeichen,
  • Dann werd ich mich, vermummt,
  • Schnell in der Kerker schleichen:
  • [ Er zieht den Dotch.
  • Ein Stoss—und er verstummt.
Rok.
  • Verhungernd in den Ketten,
  • Ertrug er lange Pein;
  • Ihn tödten, heisst ihn retten.
Piz.
  • Dann werd ich ruhig seyn.
  • [ Pizarro ab gegen den Garten, Rokko folgt ihm.

Duet.

  • Take this, old man: fortune
  • Henceforth shall favor you;
  • If a service you will yield me,
  • [ Shows him a purse.
  • A rich man shall you be.
Roc.
  • Speak on. O, quickly tell
  • In what way can I be of service?
Piz.
  • I know your zeal and coolness,
  • And what I shall now reveal
  • I think I can to you confide.
Roc.
  • Speak! what shall I do?
Piz.
  • Murder!
Roc. [ Terrified. ]
  • How!
Piz.
  • Simply listen—but do not tremble!
  • Thou tremblest? Art thou a man?
  • We must delay no longer;—
  • The state is concerned.
  • Edition: current; Page: [12]
  • That troublesome inmate of yours—
  • He must quickly be got rid of.
Roc.
  • Oh Sir!
Piz.
  • You still hesitate!— [ To himself.
  • He must live no longer,—
  • Or I shall be undone!
  • Should Pizarro live in fear?
  • I see how it is,—you falter;—
  • I will stand my ground.
Roc.
  • I feel my limbs quake under me.
  • How should I undertake it?
  • No,—I’ll not lend myself to such an act
  • Let happen what may.
  • To take away life!
  • Sir, that is not my duty.
  • [ He wants to return Pizarro the purse.
Piz.
  • I will serve myself,
  • If your courage fail;
  • But—only hasten quickly
  • And resolutely—to that man
  • Down there. [ Pointing. ] You know well.
Roc.
  • Who now scarcely lives,
  • And seems a mere shadow.
Piz.
  • [ Enraged. ] Down, I say, down to him—
  • I will wait at a short distance.
  • Dig a grave for him, in the cistern
  • In the prison, without delay.
Roc.
  • And then?
Piz.
  • You must give me a signal,
  • And I will then steal, in disguise,
  • Directly into the dungeon.
  • [ Draws his dagger.
  • One blow—and he is dumb.
Roc.
  • Half famished, and in chains,
  • Long has he endured the severest misery;
  • To rid him of life, would be to release him.
Piz.
  • Then I shall be at peace.
  • [ Exit Pizarro towards the garden, Rocco following.

AUFTRITT VI.— : Leonore, tritt in heftiger innerer Bewegung von der andern Seite auf, und sieht den Abgehenden mit steigender Unruhe nach.

SCENE VI.— : Enter Leonora, in violent agitation, from the side opposite to that on which Pizarro and Rocco have gone off, having overheard the intention of Pizarro.

Recitativ.

Leo.
  • Abscheulicher! wo eilst du hin?
  • Was hast du vor im wilden Grimme?
  • Des Mitleids Ruf, der Menschheit Stimme,
  • Rührt nicht mehr deinem Tigersinn.
  • Doch, toben auch, wie Meereswogen,
  • Dir in der Seele Zorn und Wuth,
  • So leuchtet mir ein Farbebogen,
  • Der hell auf dunkeln Wolken ruht.
  • Der blickt so still, so freidlich nieder,
  • Der spiegelt alte Zeiten wieder,—
  • Und neu besänftigt wallt mein Blut.

Recitative.

  • To what new and dreadful crime
  • Will thy vengeance now induce thee?
  • Oh, monster! can no touch of pity
  • From thy brutal heart be look’d for?
  • But vain shall be your machinations:
  • A sweet presentiment of that assures me.
  • For his infamies, the Almighty
  • A fitting reward will mete him.
  • Ah! I feel within me new hopes arise;
  • An inward sense of coming happiness
  • Sustains and cheers my heart.
lf1422_figure_004.jpg
Edition: current; Page: [13]
lf1422_figure_005.jpg

KOMM HOFFNUNG, LASS DEN LETZTEN STERN —OH HOPE, SWEET SOLACE. Leonora.

Leo.
  • Ich folg’ dem innern Triebe,
  • Ich wanke nicht;
  • Mich stärkt die Pflicht
  • Der treuen Gattinn Liebe.
  • [ Geht ab gegen den Garten.
Leo.
  • Love will thither guide me.
  • By love and hope supported:
  • No more with fear I tremble.
  • Oh thou, whom alone I love,
  • Soon will thy true wife thy cruel torments end.
  • [ Exit towards the garden.

AUFTRITT VII.— : Marzelline kommt aus dem Hause, Jaquino ihr nach.

Jaq.

Aber Marcelline—

Mar.

Kein Wort, keine Sylbe! Ich will nichts mehr von deinen albernen Liebeseufzern hören, und dabei bleibts.

Jaq.

Wer das gesagt hätte, als ich mir vornahm, mich recht ordentlich in dich zu verlieben: da war ich der gute, der liebe Jaquino! aber dieser Fidelio—

Mar.

[ rasch einfallend. ] Ich läugne nicht, ich war dir gut; aber sieh—ich bin offenherzig—das war keine Liebe. Fidelio zieht mich weit mehr an; zwischen ihm und mir find’ ich eine viel grössere Uebereinstimmung.

Jaq.

Eine Uebereinstimmung mit einem solchen hergelaufenen Jungen, der, Gott weiss woher kommt; den der Vater aus blossem Mitleid am Thore dort aufgenommen hat, der—der—

Mar.

[ ärgerlich. ] Der arm und verlassen ist, und den ich dennoch heirathen werde.

Jaq.

Glaubst du, dass ich das leiden werde? He! dass es ja nicht in meiner Gegenwart geschieht; ich möchte Euch einen gewaltigen Streich spielen.

SCENE VII.— : Marcellina enters from the House followed by Jacquino.

Jac.

But, Marcellina!

Mar.

Not a word—silence! I do not wish to hear another word of your silly love-sighs and nonsense.

Jac.

Why did you not say as much when first I took it into my head to fall regularly in love with you? Then I had none of your rebuffs and snubbings;—then I was your dear Jacquino: But the moment this Fidelio—

Mar.

[ Interrupting him. ] Very true. I liked thee at first, or I fancied so—I may as well be frank and open with thee. But, since Fidelio has been among us, my mind has changed: for him I feel much more liking and sympathy.

Jac.

What! for a young vagabond who comes—God knows whence; and whom your father housed in charity; who—who—

Mar.

[ Angrily. ] Who is poor and deserted, and shall be my spouse, notwithstanding.

Jac.

And do you imagine that I will suffer it? No, no, believe me. If ever I catch you together, you shall see what I will do.

AUFTRITT VIII.— : Vorige, Rokko, Leonore, aus dem Garten.

Rok.

Was habt ihr Beide denn wieder zu zanken?

Mar.

Ach, Vater, er verfolgt mich immer!

Rok.

Warum denn?

Mar.

[ zu Leonoren laufend. ] Er will, dass ich ihn lieben, dass ich ihn heirathen soll?

Jaq.

Ja, ja, sie soll mich lieben, sie soll mich wenigstens heirathen, und ich—

Rok.

Stille!—Ich werde eine einzige gute Tochter haben, werde sie so gut gepflegt [ streichelt Marzellinen am Kinn, ] mit so viel Mühe bis in ihr sechszehntes Jahr erzogen haben, und das Alles für den Herrn da? [ blicht lachend auf Jaquino. ] Nein, Jaquino, mich beschäftigen jetzt andere klügere Dinge.

Mar.

Ich verstehe, Vater, [ zärtlich leise. ] Fidelio.

Leo.

Brechen wir davon ab. Rokko, ich ersuchte Euch schon einigemal, die armen Gefangenen die hier über der Erde wohnen, in unsern Festungsgarten zu lassen. Ihr verspracht und verschobt es immer. Heute ist das Wetter so schön. Der Gouverneur kommt um diese Zeit nicht hieher.

Mar.

O ja, ich bitte mit ihm!

Rok.

Kinder,—ohne Erlaubniss des Gouverneurs?

Mar.

Aber er sprach so lange mit Euch? Vielleicht sollt Ihr ihm einen Gefallen thun, und dann wird er’s so genau nicht nehmen.

Rok.

Einen Gefallen? Du hast Recht, Marzelline! Auf diese Gefahr kann ich’s wagen. Wohl denn. Jaquino und Fidelio öffnet die leichtern Gefängnisse. Ich aber gehe zu Pizarro und halte ihn auf, indem ich [ gegen Marzelline, ] für dein Bestes rede.

Mar.

[ küsst ihm die Hand. ] So recht, Vater!

[ Rokko geht ab.

[ Leonore und Jaquino schliessen die Gefängniss-thüren auf, ziehen sich dann mit Marzellinen in den Hintergrund, und beobachten mit Theilnahme die nach und nach auftretenden Gefangenen

SCENE VIII.— : Enter Rocco and Leonora from the Garden.

Roc.

What! are you two quarrelling again?

Mar.

Ah, father, he is always teasing me!

Roc.

What about?

Edition: current; Page: [14]
Mar.

[ Running to Leonora. ] He wishes me to love him—to marry him!

Jaq.

Yes, signor; and if she will not love me, she shall at least marry me; and I—

Roc.

Hold your tongue, sirrah! Ah! think you I have brought up my only daughter [ Patting Marcellina’s cheek, ] with parental care, increasing with her years, till she has seen her sixteenth summer, for such a gentleman as you? Ha! ha! [ Laughing at Jaquino. ] No, Jaquino. But weighty matters now engage my mind.

Mar.

I understand, dear father. [ Tenderly. ] Fidelio!

Leo.

Enough of this. Rocco, often I have begged of you to allow the poor prisoners, in this dismal cell immured, to come and breathe the pure air of this garden. Though often promised, you have never yet done it. To-day the weather is so beautiful! The Governor never comes at this time of day.

Mar.

Oh yes, I too ask it.

Roc.

Without permission of the Governor? My dear children—

Mar.

But he was talking with you so long: perhaps he was asking a favor?—In that case, he could not be very particular.

Roc.

A favor? Well guessed, Marcellina. I think I may venture. Jacquino and Fidelio, you may undo the door. I’ll to Pizarro, and with conversation on your behalf, [ sympathetically, to Marcellina, ] occupy him.

Mar.

[ Kisses his hand. ] Oh, blessings on you, father dear!

[ Exit Rocco.

[ Leonora and Jacquino open the Prison-doors, then withdraw with Marcellina to the background, and watch with interest the Prisoners, as they gradually enter

FINALE.—AUFTRITT IX. : Chor der Gefangenen.

  • O welche Lust in freier Luft
  • Den Athem einzuheben!
  • Nur hier, nur hier ist Leben.
  • Der Kerker eine Gruft.
Ein Gefangener.
  • Wir wollen mit Vertrauen
  • Auf Gottes Hülfe bauen;
  • Die Hoffnung flustert sanft mir zu
  • Wir werden frei, werd finden Ruh?
Alle.
  • O Himmel! Rettung! welch ein Glück.
  • O Freiheit, kehrest du zurück!

[ Hier erschient ein Offizier auf dem Wall und entfernt sich wieder.

Einer.
  • Sprecht leise,—haltet Euch zurück—
  • Wir sind belauscht mit Ohr und Blick
Alle.
  • Sprecht leise, haltet Euch zurück—
  • Wir sind belauscht mit Ohr und Blick.
  • O Welche Lust, in freier Luft
  • Den Athem einzuheben,
  • Nur hier, nur hier ist Leben,
  • Der Kerker eine Gruft.

[ Ehe der Chor noch ganz geendet ist, erscheint Rokko im Hintergrunde dir Bühne und redet angelegentlich mit Leonoren. Die Gefangenen entfernen sich in den Garten.

FINALE.—SCENE IX. : Chorus of Prisoners.

  • Oh, what a pleasure once again
  • Freely to breathe the fresh air!
  • In Heaven’s light we live again;
  • From death we have escaped.
One of them.
  • Let us in Heaven trust;
  • On Heaven depend our hopes:
  • He will on our griefs look with pity.
  • On His goodness all things depend.
All.
  • Oh, liberty! oh, salvation!
  • Oh, God, upon our miseries have pity!

[ Here an Officer appears on the wall, and again retires.

Prisoner.
  • Silence! make no noise!
  • Pizarro’s eyes and ears are o’er us!
All.
  • Silence! make no noise!
  • Pizarro’s eyes and ears are o’er us!
  • Oh! what a pleasure once again
  • Freely to breathe the fresh air!
  • In Heaven’s light we live again;
  • From death we have escaped.

[ Before the Chorus has finished, Rocco appears in the background, and talks eagerly to Leonora. The Prisoners retire into the Garden.

AUFTRITT X.— : Rokko, Leonore.

Leo.
  • Nun sprecht, wie gings?
Rok.
  • Recht gut! recht gut!
  • Zusammen rafft ich mienen Muth,
  • Und trug ihm alles vor,
  • Und solltest du es glauben,
  • Was er zur Antworth mir gab?
  • Die Hierath, und dass du mir hilfst, will er erlauben,
  • Noch heute führ’ ich in die Kerker dich hinab.
Leo.
  • [ ausbrechend. ] Noch heure! Welch ein Glück!
  • O welche Wonne!
Rok.
  • Ich sehe deine Freude,
  • Nur noch ein Augenblick,
  • Dann gehen wie schon Beide.
Leo.
  • Wohin?
Rok.
  • Zu jenem Mann hinab,
  • Dem ich seit vielen Wochen
  • Stets weniger zu essen gab.
Leo.
  • Gott! wird er losgesprochen?
Rok.
  • O nein!
Leo.
  • So sprecht!
Rok.
  • O nein! o nein! [ Geheimnissvoll ]
  • Wis müssen ihn—doch wie?—befreien.
  • Er muss in einer Stunde,—
  • Den Finger auf dem Munde,—
  • Von uns begraben seyn.
Leo.
  • So ist er todt?
Rok.
  • Noch nicht, noch nicht!
Leo.
  • [ zurückfahrend. ] Ist, ihn zu tödten, deine Pflicht?
Rok.
  • Nein, guter Junge, zittre nicht.
  • Zum Morden dringt sich Rokko nicht!
  • Der Gouverneur kommt selbst herab,
  • Wir beide graben nur das Grab.
Leo.
  • [ bei Seite. ] Vielleicht das Grab des Gatten graben,
  • O was kann fürchterlicher seyn.
Rok.
  • Ich darf ihn nicht mit Speise laben,
  • Er wird im Grab zufrieden seyn.

SCENE X.— : Rocco and Leonora.

Leo.
  • Now speak—how have you succeeded?
Roc.
  • Why well, very well.
  • I composed my mind,
  • And represented every thing to him;
  • And, would you believe, now, his answer?
  • Edition: current; Page: [15]
  • That he will allow the marriage,
  • And that you shall be my assistant.
  • Even to-day I take you into the dungeons.
Leo.
  • [ Joyously. ] To-day! What a respite!
  • Oh, what true delight!
Roc.
  • I perceive how glad you are.
  • Stay, however, a moment or two,
  • And then we will both go together.
Leo.
  • Whither?
Roc.
  • Down to that poor man,
  • To whom, for so many months,
  • I have daily given less and less of food.
Leo.
  • O God! is he to be freed?
Roc.
  • Oh no!
Leo.
  • Say not so!
Roc.
  • No! oh no! [ With an air of deep secresy. ]
  • We must—oh! in what manner!—set him free
  • That is, boy, he must, in an hour,—
  • Your finger on your lip,—
  • Be laid in his grave, and by our hands.
Leo.
  • Ah! then he is dead?
Roc.
  • Not yet, not yet!
Leo.
  • [ Starting back. ] What! is it thy duty to kill him?
Roc.
  • No, good youth, let not that fear distress you.
  • Rocco does not hire himself to murder!
  • The Governor will himself come down—
  • We two have only to dig the grave.
Leo.
  • [ Aside. ] Perhaps to dig the grave of my husband!
  • What can be more horrible?
Roc.
  • Any one else at his bidding
  • Is willing to become a murderer.

Duetto.

Rok.
  • Wir müssen gleich zu Werke schreiten,
  • Du musst mir helfen, mich begleiten,
  • Hart ist des Kerkermeisters Brod.
Leo.
  • Ich folge dir, wär’s in den Tod!
Rok.
  • In der zerfallenen Cisterne
  • Bereiten wir die Grabe leicht.
  • Ich thu’ es, glaube mir, nicht gerne,
  • Auch dir ist schaurig, wie mir deucht
Leo.
  • Ich bins nur noch nicht recht gewohnt.
Rok.
  • Ich hätte gerne dich verschont,
  • Doch wird es mir allein zu schwer,
  • Und gar zu streng ist unser Herr.
Leo.
  • O welch ein Schmerz!
Rok.
  • Mir scheint, er weine!
  • Nein, du bleibst hier, ich geh’ alleine.
Leo.
  • Ich muss ihn seh’n, den Armen seh’n,
  • Und müsst ich selbst zu Grunde geh’n.
Rok.
  • So säumen wir nuo länger nicht.

Duet.

Roc.
  • This work of grief you now must aid in;
  • With courage great the deed pursuing,
  • Mark what I do, and follow me
Leo.
  • Yes, father, I will follow thee!
Roc.
  • With noiseless tread, in yonder corner
  • The cistern near, a grave we’ll make;
  • I do it much against my wishes;
  • And thou art shaking, too, with fear.
Leo.
  • I’m quite prepared, confide in me!
Roc.
  • I willingly liad spar’d you this,
  • But, all alone, the work’s too much.
Leo.
  • Oh! cruel fate!
Roc.
  • Methinks he weeps! Nay, stay thou here,
  • And I will go without thee,
  • Whilst thou in peace shalt rest, and wait me here
Leo.
  • Ah, no! I feel an ardor new inspire me;
  • No labor done with thee will tire me;
  • With thee, dear father, will I go.
Roc.
  • Thus, then, we will no longer stay,
  • ’Tis duty calls, and we obey.

AUFTRITT XI.— : Marzelline und Jaquino ( athemlos hereinstürzend ) Vorige.

Mar.
  • O Vater, eilet!
Rok.
  • Was hast du denn?
Jaq.
  • Nicht länger weilet!
Rok.
  • Was ist gescheh’n?
Mar.
  • Voll Zorn folgt mir
  • Pizarro nach,
  • Er drohet dir.
Rok.
  • Gemach! gemach!
Leo.
  • So Eilet fort!
Rok.
  • Nur noch ein Wort!
  • Sprich, weiss er schon!
Jaq.
  • Ja, er weiss schon!
Mar.
  • Der Offizier
  • Sagt’ ihm, was wir
  • Jetzt den Gefangenen gewähren.
Rok.
  • Lasst Alle schnell zurückkehren.
  • [ Jaquino, geht ab in den Garten.
Mar.
  • Ihr wisst es, wie er tobet,
  • Und kennet seine Wuth.
Leo.
  • Wie mir’s im Herzen tobet,
  • Empöret ist mein Blut.
Rok.
  • Mein Herz hat mich gelobet,
  • Sey der Tyrann in Wuth!

SCENE XI.— : The same Marcellina and Jacquino rush in, out of breath

Mar.
  • Oh! Father,—hasten!
Roc.
  • What is the matter, child?
Jac.
  • Tarry no longer!
Roc.
  • What has happened?
Mar.
  • Pizarro is following me,
  • Full of anger,
  • And threatening you so wildly!
Roc.
  • Peace!—softly—
Leo.
  • Then hasten away!
Roc.
  • Only one word,—speak!
  • Does he already know?—
Jac.
  • Yes, yes,—he knows already!
Mar.
  • The officer
  • Has told him that we
  • Are now indulging the prisoners.
Edition: current; Page: [16]
Roc.
  • All of you go back instantly.
  • [ Jacquino goes away into the Garden.
Mar.
  • You know how he rages,
  • And his fierce severity.
Leo.
  • How my heart is swelling—
  • My whole soul is up in arms.
Roc.
  • My conscience acquits me—
  • Let the tyrant rave!

AUFTRITT XII.— : Pizarro, zwei Offiziere, Wache, die Vorigen.

Piz.
  • Verwegner Alter! welche Rechte
  • Legst du dir frevelnd selber bei,
  • Und ziemt es dem gedungnen Knechte,
  • Zu geben die Gefangnen frei?
Rok. [ verlegen. ]
  • O Herr!
Piz.
  • Wohlan!
Rok.
  • [ eine Entschuldigung suchend. ]
  • Des Frühlings Kommen—
  • Das heitre warme Sonnenlicht—
  • Dann—[ sich fassend ] habt Ihr wohl in Acht genommen,
  • Was sonst zu meinem Vortheil spricht.
  • [ Die mütze abziehend. ]
  • Des Königs Namensfest ist heute,
  • Das feiern wir auf solche Art.
  • [ Geheim zu Pizarro.
  • Der unten stirbt, doch lasst die Andern
  • Jetzt fröhlich hin und wieder wandern;
  • Für jenen sey der Zorn gespart.
Piz. [ leise. ]
  • So eile, ihm sein Grab zu graben,
  • Hier will ich stille Ruhe haben.
  • Schliesst die Gefangenen wieder ein,
  • Mögst du nie mehr verwegen seyn.
Die Gefangenen.
  • Leb’ wohl, du warmes Sonnenlicht,
  • Schnell schwindest du uns wieder,
  • Schon sinkt die Nacht hernieder,
  • Aus der sobald kein Morgen bricht.
Piz.
  • Nun Rokko, zögre länger nicht,
  • Steig in den Kerker nieder. [ Leise.
  • Nicht eher kehrst du wieder,
  • Bis ich vollzogen das Gericht.
Rok.
  • Nein, Herr, nein, länger zögr’ ich nicht,
  • Ich steige eilend nieder.
  • Mir beben meine Glieder, [ Für sich.
  • O unglückselig harte Pflicht!
Leo. [ zu den Gefangenen. ]
  • Ihr hört das Wort, drum zögert nicht,
  • Kehrt in den Kerker wieder. [ Fur sich.
  • Angst rinnt durch meine Glieder.
  • Ereilt den Frevler kein Gericht?
Jaq. [ zu den Gefangenen. ]
  • Ihr hört das Wort, drum zögert nicht,
  • Kehrt in den Kerker wieder.
  • [ Für sich Rokko und Leonoren beobachtend.
  • Sie sinnen auf und nieder—
  • Könnt ich versteh’n, was jeder spricht.
Mar. [ die Gefangenen betrachtend. ]
  • Wir eilen so zum Sonnenlicht,
  • Und scheiden traurig wieder.
  • Die andern murmeln nieder;
  • Hier wohnt die Lust, die Freude nicht.
  • [ Die Gefangenen gehen in ihre Zellen, die Leonore und Jaquino verschliessen.
ende des ersten aufzugs.

SCENE XII.— : Enter Pizarro, two Officers, and Guards.

Piz.
  • Insolent old man! how dar’st thou,
  • In defiance of my will,
  • Thus to usurp my authority,
  • And set the prisoners free?
Roc.
  • [ Embarrassed. ] Alas!
Piz.
  • Well?
Roc.
  • [ Trying to think of an excuse. ]
  • Do you think it a crime
  • Your wishes to anticipate?
  • [ Collecting himself.
  • I thought it right, on such a day,
  • To alleviate their sufferings.
  • [ Doffing his cap.
  • Our gracious King’s birth-day
  • We in this way celebrate.
  • [ Low, to Pizarro
  • In obedience to your order,
  • For the condemned prisoner
  • I am now about to dig a grave.
Piz.
  • [ Softly ] Hasten, then, and quickly do so.
  • And I will, this once, overlook the fault.
  • Shut up the prisoners, and remember,
  • Never again be guilty of a similar indiscretion.
The Prisoners.
  • Farewell, thou warm sun-light!
  • Quickly thou disappearest again from our gaze.
  • Only the night remains for us,
  • From which no morning may ever break again.
Piz.
  • Now, Rocco, no longer tarry,
  • But get thee down to the dungeou, [ Softly.
  • And from thence you return not
  • Till I have completed my purpose.
Roc.
  • No, sir, no, I’ll not remain any longer;
  • I will hasten below.
  • My limbs tremble under me. [ Aside.
  • Oh, wretched old man! oh, heart-rending duty!
Leo. [ To the Prisoners. ]
  • You hear the word, then linger not here:
  • Return into the prison. [ Aside.
  • Breathless anxiety runs through all my veins.
  • Does no judgment overtake the evil-doer?
Jac. [ To the Prisoners. ]
  • You hear the word, then linger not here:
  • Return to the prison.
  • [ Aside, observing Rocco and Leonora.
  • They are pondering and whispering there—
  • I wish I could hear what they are saying.
Mar. [ Looking at the Prisoners. ]
  • For a few short moments we see each other in the warm sunshine,
  • Then part again in sorrow.
  • Here freedom must not reign.
  • Alas! no joy must ever enter here.
  • [ The Prisoners go into their cells, which Leonara and Jacquino lock after them.
end of act i.
Edition: current; Page: [17]

AUFZUG II.

ACT II.

AUFTRITT I.— : Das Theater stellt einen unterirdischen dunkeln Kerker vor. Den Zuschauern links ist eine mit Steinen und Schutt bedeckte Cisterne. Im Hintergrunde sind mehrere, mit Gitterwerk verwahrte, Oeffungen in der Mauer, durch welche man die Stufen einer von der Höhe herunterführenden Treppe sieht: rechts die letztern Stufen und die Thüre in das Gefängniss. Eine Lampe brennt.

[ Florestan allein Er sitzt auf einem Stein, um den Leib hat er eine tange Kette, deren Ende in der Mauer befestigt ist.

SCENE I.— : A dark subterranean Dungeon. To the left a cistern or reservoir, covered with stones and rubbish. In the background, several openings in the wall, guarded with gratings, through which can be seen the steps of a staircase, leading from above. To the right, the doo into the Prison. A lamp hanging.

[ Florestan, alone. He sits on a stone: round his body is a long chain, the end of which is fastened to the wall.

Recitativ.

  • Gott! welch ein Dunkel hier!
  • O grauenvolle Stille!
  • Oed ist es um mich her,
  • Nichts lebet ausser mir.
  • O schwere Prüfung! doch gerecht ist Gottes Wille,
  • Ich murre nicht, das Maass der Leiden steht bei dir.

Recitative.

  • Alas! what darkness dense!
  • What horrid stillness!
  • Here in this dark tomb, is nothing known
  • But my deep anguish! Oh, most cruel torture!
  • Oh, Heavenly Providence, how much longer
  • Will this my misery last!

Arie.

  • In des Lehens Frühlingstagen,
  • Ist das Glück von mir gefloh’n.
  • Wahrheit wagt ich kühn zu sagen,
  • Und die Ketten sind mein Lohn.
  • Willig duld’ ich alle Schmerzen,
  • Ende schmählich meine Bahn;
  • Süsser Trost in meinem Herzen:
  • Meine Pflicht hab’ ich gethan,
  • [ In einer, an Wahnsina gränzenden, jedoch ruhigen Begeisterung.

Air.

  • In the bright morning of life
  • My liberty, alas! was lost:
  • These chains are the reward
  • Of true and open speaking.
  • But what avails my lamentations?
  • Hopeless is my condition:
  • The only solace for my torments
  • Rests on my conscious innocence.
  • [ Enthusiastically, but calmly.
lf1422_figure_006.jpg

UND SPUR ICH NICHT LINDE —WHAT FEELING COMES O’ER ME. Air. Florestan.

[ Er sinkt, erschöpft, von der letzten Gemüthbewegung auf den Felsensitz wieder; seine Hande verhüllen sein Gesicht.

[ He sinks, exhausted, upon the stony seat, concealing his jace with his hands.

AUFTRITT II.— : Rokko, Leonore, Florestan. Die beiden ersten, die man durch die Oeffnungen bei dem Schein einer Laterne die Treppe herabsteigen sah, tragen einen Krug und die Werkzeuge zum Graben. Die Hinterthüre öffnet sich und das Theater erhellt sich zur Hälfte.

Leo. [ halblaut. ]

Wie kalt ist es in diesem unterirdischen Gewölbe.

Rok.

Das ist natürlich! Es ist ja so tief.

Leo.

[ sieht unruhig nach allen Seiten umher. ] Ich glaubte schon, wir würden den Eingang nicht finden.

Rok.

[ sich gegen Florestans Seite wendend. ] Still! da ist der Gefangene.

Leo.

[ mit gebrochener Stimme, indem sie den Gefangenen zu erkennen sucht. ] Er scheint ganz ohne Bewegung.

Rok.

Vielleicht ist er todt!

Leo.

Ihr meiut es?

Rok.

Nein, nein, er schläft nur. Das müssen wir benützen und gleich ans Werk gehen; wir haben keine Zeit zu verlieren.

Leo.

[ für sich. ] Est ist unmöglich, seine Züge zu unterscheiden; Gott stehe mir bei, wenn er es ist!

Rok.

Hier unter diesen Trümmern ist eine Cisterne von der ich dir gesagt habe. Wir brauchen nicht viel Zeit um an die Oeffnung zu kommen. Gieb mir eine Haue, und du stelle dich hierher. Du zitterst—fürchtest du dich?

Leo.

O nein, es ist nur so kalt.

Rok.

So mach’ fort, beim Arbeiten wird dir schon warm werden.

[ Sie fangen an zu graben.

SCENE II.— : Rocco, Leonora, Florestan. The two former, who have been seen through the openings coming down the stairs, carry a pitcher and implements for digging. The back door opens, and the Stage is half lighted.

Leo. [ In an under-tone. ]

Oh, how freezing told it is in this dismal vault!

Rok.

Natural enough in a place so subterranean

Edition: current; Page: [18]
Leo.

[ Looking on every side in agitation. ] I thought we should never find the entrance.

Roc.

[ Turning towards Florestan’s side. ] Silence! the prisoner is there.

Leo.

[ With a broken voice, seeking to recognize him. ] In what a state!—unconscious, motionless!

Roc.

Perhaps he is dead!

Leo.

Dost think so?

Roc.

No, no; he only sleeps. The moment is propitious. Give me your hand. Let’s to our work—we have no time to lose.

Leo.

[ Aside. ] It is impossible to distinguish his features: If it be he, oh God, help me.

Roc.

Here, under this rubbish, is the cistern of which I have spoken. It will not take us long to reach the opening. Give me the pickaxe, and stand thou there. Thou tremblest!—of what art thou afraid?

Leo.

Oh, no! only it is so cold!

Roc.

Working will soon warm you.

[ They begin to dig.

Duett.

[ Während des Ritornells benutzt Leonore, wenn sich Rokko bückt, den Augenblick um den Gefangenen zu beobachten. Das Duett wird durchaus halblaut gesungen.

Rok. [ während der Arbeit. ]
  • Nur hurtig fort und frisch gegraben,
  • Es währt nich lang so kommt er her.
Leo. [ ebenfalls arbeitend. ]
  • Ihr sollet nicht zu klagen haben,
  • Denn mir wird keine Arbeit schwer.
Rok.
  • [ einen grossen Stein, an der Stelle wo er hinabsteig, hebend. ] Komm, hilf doch diesend Stein mir heben.
  • Hab’ acht! hab’ acht! er hat Gewicht.
Leo.
  • Ich helfe schon, o sorget nicht,
  • Ich will mir alle Mühe geben
Rok.
  • Ein wenig noch.
Leo.
  • Geduld!
Rok.
  • Er weicht.
Leo.
  • Nur etwas noch.
Rok.
  • Er ist nicht leicht.
  • [ Sie rollen den Stein über Trümmer und holen Athem.—Wieder arbietend.
  • Nur hurtig fort, nur frisch gegraben!
  • Es währt nich lang, er kommt herein.
Leo. [ eben falls wieder arbeitend
  • Lasst mich mur wieder Kräfte haben,
  • Wir werden bald zu Ende seyn.
  • [ Betrachten den Gefangenen, während Rokko von ihr abgewandt mit gekrümmtem Rücken arbeitet, leise.
  • Wer du auch seyst, ich will dich retten;
  • Bei Gott! Du sollst kein Opber seyn.
  • Gewiss, ich löse deine Ketten;
  • Ich will, du Armer, dich befrei’n.
Rok. [ sich schnell aufrichtend. ]
  • Was zanderst du in deiner Pflicht?
Leo.
  • Nein, Vater! nein, ich zaudre nicht.
Rok.
  • Nur hurtig fort, nur frisch gegraben
  • Es währt nicht lang, so kommt er her.
Leo.
  • Ihr sollet nicht zu klagen haben,
  • Denn mir wird keine Arbeit schwer. [ Rokko trinkt.
  • [ Florestan erhält sich und hebt das Haupt in die Höhe, ohne sich nach Leonoren zu wenden.
Leo.
  • Er erwacht!
Rok.

[ plötzlich im Trinken inne hattend. ] Er erwacht, sagst du?

Leo.

[ in grösster Verwirrung, immer nach Florestan sehend. ] Ja, er hat eben den Kopf in die Höhe gehoben.

Rok.

Ohne Zweifel wird er wieder tausend Fragen an mich stellen. Ich muss allein mit ihm reden. Nun bald hat er’s überstanden. [ Er steigt aus der Grube. ] Steig du, statt nieiner, hinab, und räume noch so viel hinweg, dass man die Cisterne öffnen kann.

Leo.

[ sie steigt zitterad ein paar Stufen hinab. ] Was in mir vorgeht, ist unaussprechlich!

Rok.

[ Zu Florestan. ] Nun, Ihr habt wieder einige Augenblicke geruht?

Flo.

Geruht? Wie fände ich Ruhe?

Leo.

[ für sich. ] Diese stimme!—Wenn ich nur einen Augenblick sein Gesicht sehen könnte.

Flo.

Werdet Ihr immer bei meinen Klagen taub seyn, grausamer Mann?

[ Mit den letzten Worten wendet er sein Gesicht gegen Leonoren.

Leo.

Gott! Er ist’s!

[ Sie fällt ohne Bewusstseyn an den Rand der Grube.

Rok.

Was verlangt Ihr denn von mir? Ich vollziehe die Befehle die man mir giebe; das ist mein Amt, meine Pflicht.

Flo.

Saget mir endlich einmal, wer ist der Gouverneur dieses Getängnisses?

Rok.

[ bei Seite. ] Jetzt kann ich ihm ja ohne Gefahr genug thun. [ Laut. ] Der Gouverneur dieses Gefängnisses ist Don Pizarro.

Leo.

[ Sich allmählig erholend. ] O Barbar! deine Grausamkeit giebt mir meine Kräfte wieder.

Flo.

O schickt sobald als möglich nach Sevilla,—fragt nach Leonoren Florestan.

Leo.

Gott! Er ahnet nicht, dass sie jezt sein Grab gräbt.

Flo.

Sagt ihr, dass ich hier in Ketten liege.

Rok.

Es ist unmoglich, sag’ ich Euch; ich würde mich ins Verderben stürzen, ohne Euch genützt zu haben.

Flo.

Wenn ich denn verdammt binn, hier zu verschmachten, O so lasst mich nicht so langsam enden!

Leo.

[ springt auf und hällt sich fest. ] O Gott! wer kann dass ertragen?

Flo.

Aus Erbarmen, gebt mir nur einen Tropfen Wasser—das ist ja so wenig!

Rok.

[ bei Seite. ] Es geht mir wider meinen Willen zu Herzen.

Leo.

Er scheint ihn zu erweichen.

Flo.

Du giebst mir keine Antwort.

Rok.

Ich kann Euch nicht verschaffen, was Ihr verlangt. Alles was ich Euch anbieten kann, ist ein Restchen Wein, das ich im Kruge habe.

Leo.

[ den Krug in grösster Eile bringend. ] Da ist er—da ist er.

Flo.

[ Leonoren betrachtend. ] Wer ist das?

Rok.

Mein Schliesser, und in wenig Tagen mein Eidam. [ Reicht Florestan den Krug der trinkt. ] Es ist freilich nur wenig Wein, dreh ich gab ihn Euch gern. [ Zu Leonoren. ] Du bist ja ganz in Bewegung.

Leo.

[ in grösster Verwirrung ] Wer sollte es nicht seyn? Ihr selbst, Meister Rokko—

Rok.

Es ist wahr: der Mensch hat so eine Stimme.

Leo.

Ja wohl—sie dringt in die Tiefe des Herzens.

Duet.

[ During the Symphony, Leonora takes advantage of the moment when Rocco stoops, to observe the Prisoner. The Duet is sung in an undertone.

Roc. [ While at work. ]
  • Work quickly—dig away;
  • Pizarro will be here ere long.
Leo. [ Also working. ]
  • My zeal and labor, I hope, will please you.
  • I feel not fatigue.
Roc.
  • [ Lifting a stone at the spot where he descended. ]
  • Come, help me to raise this stone;
  • Lift up—a little more—it is very heavy.
Leo.
  • I am lifting with all my might;
  • I do not spare.
Roc.
  • Try again.
Leo.
  • Alas!
Roc.
  • So—it yields.
Leo.
  • But little.
Roc.
  • It is not light.
  • [ They roll the stone aside, and stop a moment to fetch breath.—Beginning again.
  • Let’s get on quickly—we must dig away:
  • Pizarro will be here ere long.
Leo.
  • Oh, trust in me! zealously I’ll work;—
  • I feel my strength returning.
  • [ Looks at the Prisoner whilst Rocco, at his work, is turned from her.—in an undertone.
  • Ah! whoever the unhappy one may be,
  • No weapon shall smite him!
  • No, no: this feeble hand, I hope,
  • Will restore him to his liberty.
Roc. [ Starting up quickly. ]
  • What are you loitering about?
Leo.
  • No, father, I’m not idling.
Roc.
  • Let’s get on quickly—we must dig away:
  • Pizarro will be here ere long.
Leo.
  • Oh, trust in me! zealously I’ll work;—
  • I feel my strength returning. [ Rocco drinks.
  • [ Florestan raises his head, but does not turn towards Leonora.
Leo.
  • He is waking]
Roc.

[ Ceasing to drink. ] He awakes, sayst thou?

Leo.

[ In the greatest confusion, her eyes fixed on Florestan. ] Yes, yes; he has just raised his head.

Roc.

Doubtless, he will again put a thousand questions to me. I must speak with him alone. Well, it will soon be all over with him. [ Gets up out of the grave. ] Go you Edition: current; Page: [19] down, and clear away the earth, nstead of me till you get the cistern open.

Leo.

[ Trembling, descends a step or two. ] Who now could tell what within my bosom is passing!

Roc.

[ To Florestan. ] Well, friend, are you again losing your cares in repose?

Flo.

Repose! where can I find it?

Leo.

[ To herself. ] That voice!—O, if I could only see his face for an instant!

Flo.

Oh, cruel man! will you be ever deaf to my lamentations?

[ At these words ke turns his face towards Leonora, who recognizes him.

Leo.

Oh, God! it is he!

[ She falls senseless on the edge of the grave.

Roc.

What do you ask of me? The orders I receive I execute: that is my province, my duty

Flo.

Tell me, at all events, the name of the Governor of this loathsome prison.

Roc.

[ Aside. ] There can be no harm in now telling him. [ Aloud. ] It is Don Pizarro.

Leo.

[ Gradually recovering herself ] Oh, barbarian! to my native strength thy cruelty restores me.

Flo.

Oh! if it be possible, let a messenger go to Seville, and there seek Leonora Florestan

Leo.

Little does he think, oh God! that she is now digging his grave!

Flo.

Tell her that I lie here in chains.

Roc.

It is not possible. It would ruin me, and nothing better you.

Flo.

Well, if here I am to die, let me not so slowly linger to my end.

Leo.

[ Springing to her feet, then restraining herself. ] Oh, God! who this torture can endure?

Flo.

Oh! for pity’s sake, to bathe my parched lips, give me a drop of water! a small favor that is to ask!

Roc.

[ Aside. ] My heart he touches, in spite of myself.

Leo.

[ Aside. ] He seems to soften.

Flo.

Thou dost not answer me.

Roc.

What you require I cannot procure: all that I can offer is the little wine I have remaining.

Leo.

[ Bringing the wine in great haste. ] There it is—there it is.

Flo.

[ Looking at Leonora. ] Who is he?

Roc.

At present my assistant; a few days hence to be my son-in-law. [ Hands the pitcher to Florestan, who drinks. ] There is but little wine, I see; but what there is you’re welcome so. [ To Leonora. ] How agitated thou art!

Leo.

[ In the greatest embarrassment. ] Who would not be so? You yourself, Master Rocco—

Roc.

True: so touching are the accents of his voice.

Leo.

They are—they stab me to the heart.

lf1422_figure_007.jpg
Edition: current; Page: [20]
lf1422_figure_008.jpg

EUCH WERDE LOHN IN BESSERN WELTEN! —YOU, THEN, AT LEAST, CAN PITY FEEL FOR SORROW. Air. Florestan.

Leo.
  • Der Himmel schicke Rettung dir,
  • Dann wird mir hoher Lohn gewährt.
Rok.
  • Mich rührte oft dein Leiden hier.
  • Doch Hülfe war mir streng verwehrt.
  • [ Leise zu Leonoren, die er bei Seite zieht.
  • Ich labt ihn gern den armen Männ;
  • Es ist ja bald um ihn gethan.
  • Ich thu’, was meine Pflicht gebeut.
  • Doch hass’ ich alle Grausamkeit.
Leo. [ für sich. ]
  • Wie hastig pochet mir das Herz!
  • Es wogt in Freud’ und tiefem Schmerz.
  • Die hehre bange Stunde winkt,
  • Die Tod mir, oder Rettung brinkt.
Flo. [ für sich. ]
  • Bewegt seh’ ich den Jüngling hier,
  • Und Rührung zeigt auch dieser Mann.
  • O Gott, du sendest Hoffnung mir
  • Dass ich sie noch gewinnen kann.
Leo.

[ leise zu Rokko, indem sie ein Stückchen Brod aus der Tasche zieht. ]

  • Dies Stückchen Brod. ja seit zwei Tagen
  • Trag’ ich es immer schon bei mir.
Rok.
  • Ich möchte gern, doch sag’ ich dir,
  • Das hie-se wirklich zu viel wagen.
Leo. [ schmeichelnd. ]
  • Ihr labtet gern den armen Mann!
Rok.
  • Das geht nicht an, das geht nicht an.
Leo. [ wie vorher. ]
  • Es ist ja bald um ihn gethan.
Rok.
  • So sey es, ja, du kannst es wagen.
Leo.

[ in grösster Bewegung, Florestan das Brod reichend. ]

  • Da’ nimm das Brod, du armer Mann!
Rok. [ für sich sehr gerührt. ]
  • Es ist ja bald um ihn gethan.
Flo.

[ Leonoren Hand ergreifend und an sich drückend. ]

  • O dank dir! dank Euch!
  • Euch werde Lohn in bessern Welten
Rok.
  • Der arme Mann!
Leo.
  • O mehr, als ich ertragen kann.
Rok.
  • Es ist ja bald um ihn gethan.
Flo.
  • O, dass ich Euch nicht lohnen kann.
  • [ Er verschlingt das Stück Brod.
Rok.

[ nach augenblicklichem Stillschweigen zu Leonoren. ] Alles ist bereit, ich gehe das Signal zu geben.

Flo.

[ zu Leonoren, während Rokko die Thure zu öffnen geht. ] Wo geht er hin? [ Rokko öffnet die Thüre, und giebt durch einen starken Pfiff das Zeichen. ] Ist das der Vorbote meines Todes?

Leo.

[ in der heftigsten Bewegung. ] Nein, nein, beruhige dich, lieber Gefangener.

Flo.

O, meine Leonore! so soll ich dich nie wieder sehen?

Leo.

[ sie fühlt sich zu Florestan hingezogen und sucht diesen Trieb zu überwaltigen. ] Mein ganzes Herz reisst mich zu ihm hin. [ Zu Florestan. ] Sey ruhig, sag’ ich dir. Vergiss nicht, was du auch hören und sehen magst, vergiss nicht, dass überall eine Vorsicht ist. Ja, ja! es ist eine Vorsicht.

[ Sie entfernt sich und geht gegen die Cisterne.

Leo.
  • Heaven send him deliverance,
  • Then will my reward indeed be great.
Roc.
  • Your sufferings have often moved me:
  • But to give you assistance was strictly forbidden.
  • [ Softly, to Leonora, whom he draws aside.
  • I am glad, Heaven knows, to refresh him;
  • But it is already too late.
  • I do what my duty imposes,
  • But hate all unnecessary cruelty.
Leo. [ Aside. ]
  • How violently this heart is beating!
  • My life seems to vacillate between joy and pain.
  • The awful hour fast approaches
  • That brings me to death or a happy release.
Flo. [ To himself. ]
  • The youth, I see, is affected,
  • And this man also betrays some compassion.
  • Oh God! thou sendest me hope that I may yet
  • Rejoin her for whom alone I live.
Leo.

[ Softly to Rocco, while she draws a small piece of bread from her pocket. ]

  • This bit of bread I have carried
  • In my pocket for the last two days.
Roc.
  • I would, most willingly; but, I tell you,
  • It would indeed be overstepping my license.
Leo. [ Winningly. ]
  • You’d like to refresh the poor man!
Roc.
  • Nay, I dare not—it will not do.
Leo. [ As before. ]
  • It will soon be at an end with him.
Roc.
  • Well, so be it, you may venture.
Leo.

[ In the greatest agitation, handing the bread to Florestan. ]

  • There, take the bread; poor man!
Roc. [ To himself, much affected. ]
  • Yes, it will very soon be all over with him.
Flo.

[ Grasping Leonora’s hand, and pressing it. ]

  • Thanks! thanks!
  • Be your reward in worlds above.
Roc.
  • Poor fellow!
Leo.
  • Oh! this is more than I can bear.
Roc.
  • It will soon, alas! be over with him.
Flo.
  • Oh! that I cannot repay this kindness
  • [ He eats the piece of bread.
Roc.

[ To Leonora, after a momentary silence. ] All is ready—I must give the signal.

Flo.

[ To Leonora, while Rocco goes to open the door. ] Where is he going? [ Rocco opens the door, and gives the signal by a loud whistle. ] Is that the herald of my death?

Leo.

[ In the greatest agitation. ] No, no; calm yourself, poor dear prisoner!

Flo.

Oh, my Leonora, shall I then never see thee more?

Leo.

[ She feels herself drawn towards Florestan, and strives to overcome the impulse. ] My whole heart yearns towards him. [ To Florestan. ] Be composed, I beg you. Do not forget, whatever you may hear and see, that there is a Providence over all! Yes, yes, there is a Providence over all.

[ She leaves him, and goes towards the cistern.

AUFTRITT III.— : Vorige, Pizarro, in einem Mantel vermummt.

Piz.

[ Zu Rokko. ] Ist Alles bereitet?

Rok.

Ja, die Cisterne braucht nur geöffnet zu werden.

Piz.

Gut!—der Bursche soll sich entfernen.

Rok.

[ zu Leonoren. ] Geh, entferne dich!

Leo.

[ in grösster Verwirrung. ] Wer? Ich?—und Ihr?

Rok.

Muss ich nicht dem Gefangenen die Eisen abnehmen? Geh! geh!

[ Leonore entfernt sich in den Hintergrund und nähert sich allmählig wieder im Schatten gegen Florestan, die Auqen immer auf die vermummte person richtend.

Piz.

[ bei Seite, einen Blick auf Rokko und Leonore werfend. ] Die muss ich mir heute noch Beide vom Halse schaffen, damit Alles auf immer im Dunkeln bleibt.

Rok.

[ zu Pizarro. ] Soll ich ihm die Ketten abnehmen?

Piz.

[ Zieht einen Dolch hervor. ] Nein!

SCENE III.— : The same Pizarro, disguised in a mantle.

Piz.

[ To Rocco. ] Is all ready?

Roc.

Yes; nothing remains but to open the cistern.

Piz.

Then send away the lad.

Roc.

Go; you may withdraw.

Leo.

[ Greatly perplexed. ] Who? I go? and you?

Edition: current; Page: [21]
Roc.

[ To Pizarro. ] Shall I remove the fetters from the prisoner? [ To Leonora. ] Go! go!

[ Leonora withdraws to the background, and gradually approaches Florestan in the shade, her eyes fixed on the person in disguise.

Piz.

[ Aside, casting a look at Rocco and Leonora. ] These two I must also get rid of to-day, that all may remain secure.

Roc.

[ To Pizarro. ] Shall I take off his chains?

Piz.

[ Drawing a dagger. ] No!

Quartetto.

  • Er sterbe! doch er soll erst wissen,
  • Wer ihm sein stolzes Herz zerfleischt
  • Der Rache Dunkel sev zerrissen:
  • Sieh her! Du hast dich nicht getäuscht,
  • [ Er schlägt den Mantel auf.
  • Pizarro, den du stürzen wolltest,—
  • Pizarro, den du fürchten solltest,
  • Steht nun als Rächer hier!
Flo. [ gefasst. ]
  • Ein Mörder steht vor mir!
Piz.
  • Noch einmal ruf’ ich dir,
  • Was du gethan, zurück;
  • Nur noch ein Augenblick,
  • Und dieser Dolch— [ Er will ihn durchbohren.
Leo.

[ stürzt mit einem durchdringenden Schrei hervor und bedeckt Florestan mit ihrem Korper. ]

  • Zurück?
Fio.
  • O Gott!
Rok.
  • Was soll’s?
Leo.
  • Durchbohren!
  • Musst du erst diese Brust.
  • Der Tod sev dir geschworen
  • Für deine Mörderlust.
Piz.

[ schleudert sie fort. ] Wahnsinniger!

Rok.

[ zu Leonoren ] Halt ein!

Piz.

Er soll bestraft seyn.

Leo.

[ noch einmal ihren Mann bedeckend. ]

Tödte erst sein Weib!

Piz.

Sein Weib!

Rok.

Sein Weib!

Flo.

Mein Weib!

Leo.

[ zu Florestan. ] Ja, sieh hier Leonoren.

Flo.

Leonore!

Leo.

[ zu den Andern. ] Ich bin sein Weib, geschworen

Hab’ ich ihm Trost. Verderben dir!

Piz.

Sein Weib! [ für sich. ] Welch unerhörter Muth!

Flo.

[ zu Leonoren. ] Vor Freude starrt mein Blut!

Rok.
  • Mir starrt vor Angst das Blut!
Leo.
  • Ich trotze seiner Wuth!
Piz.
  • Soll ich vor einem Weibe beben?
  • Nun opfr’ ich beide meinem Grimm!
  • Getheilt hast du mit ihm das Leben,
  • So theile nun den Tod mit ihm.

[ Er will auf sie eindringen, Leonore zieht hastig eine kleine Pistole aus der Brust und hällt sie Pizarro vor.

Leo.
  • Noch einen Laut und du bist todt!
  • [ Man hört die Trompete auf dem Thurm.
Piz.
  • Ha! der Minister! Hell und Tod!
Rok.
  • O, was ist das? gerechter Gott!

[ Pizarro steht betäubt, Rokko ebenso. Leonore hängt an Florestans Halse. Man hört die Trompeten stärker.

Quartett.

  • He shall die! his fate is seal’d,
  • But first he shall know by whom he falls;
  • Whose hand the mortal blow shall strike:
  • Yes, yes! the traitor all shall know:
  • [ Throwing open his mantle
  • Pizarro all thy projects has foreseen,—
  • Pizarro, whom thou would’st o’erthrow,
  • As avenger now stands before thee!
Flo.
  • A murderer stands before me!
Piz.
  • No more will I withhold my rage—
  • There is but an instant
  • Between thee and death, and
  • Thus I sate my fury— [ He tries to stab him.
Leo.

[ Springing forward with a piercing shriek, and protecting Florestan with her body. ]

Back, tyrant!

Flo.
  • Oh, Heaven!
Roc.
  • What would’st thou?
Leo.
  • Would’st thou stab him?
  • Through this breast to his!
  • In vain shall be thy fury;—
  • With my body I’ll protect him.
Piz.

[ Thrusts her away. ] Madman!

Roc.

[ To Leonora. ] Oh, desist!

Piz.

He shall be punished.

Leo.

[ Once more shielding her husband. ]

Kill first his wife!

Piz.

His wife!

Roc.

His wife!

Flo.

My wife!

Leo.

[ To Florestan. ] Yes, your own Leonora.

Flo.

Leonora!

Leo.

[ To the others. ] I am his wife, and have sworn

To save him and punish his oppressor.

Piz.

His wife! [ Aside. ] What unheard of courage!

Flo.

My heart now throbs with joy!

Roc.

Terror my blood congeals!

Leo.

His rage I defy!

Piz.
  • With rage I am o’erpower’d!
  • Shall I before a woman tremble?
  • Thou also shalt fall before my rage!
  • Stand off, or thou shalt share his death.

[ Pizarro advances, raising the dagger. Leonora suddenly draws a small pistol from her bosom and presents it at him.

Leo.
  • Another word, and thou art dead!
  • [ The sound of a trumpet is heard from a tower.
Piz.
  • Ah! the Minister!—Hell and death!
Roc.
  • What is that? Just Heaven!

[ Pizarro and Rocco stand confounded. Leonora hangs on Florestan’s neck.—The trumpet sounds louder.

AUFTRITT IV.— : Vorige Jaquino, Offiziere und Soldaten erscheinen an der obersten Gitteröffnung der Treppe.

Jaq.

[ spricht während der angezeigten Musikpause ] Vater Rokko! der Herr Minister kommt an! sein Gefolge ist schon vor dem Schlossthore.

Rok.

[ freudig und überrascht—für sich. ] Gelobt sey Gott! [ zu Jaquino sehr laut. ] Wir kommen! ja, wir kommen augenbheklich! und diese Leute mit Fackeln sollen heruntersteigen und den Herrn Gouverneur hinauf begleiten.

[ Die Soldaten kommen bis an die Thüre herunter. Die Offiziere und Jaquino gehen oben ab

Piz.
  • Verflucht sey diese Stunde!
  • Die Hölle spottet mein.
  • Verzweiflung wird im Bunde
  • Mit meiner Rache seyn.
Rok.
  • O fürchterliche Stunde!
  • O Gott! was wartet mein?
  • Ich will nicht mehr im Bunde
  • Mit diesem Wüthrich seyn.
Leo. und Flo.
  • { Es schlägt der Rache Stunde,
  • { Du sollst
  • { Ich soll gerettet seyn.
  • { Die Liehe wird im Bunde
  • { Mit Muthe dich/mich befrei’n.

[ Pizarro stürzt fort, und in er Rokko einem Wink qiebt, ihm zu folqen. Dieset benutzt den Augenblick, da Pizarro schon qeht, fasst die Hände beider Gatten, drückt sie an seine Brust, deutet qegen Himmel und eilt nach. Die Soldaten leuchten Pizarro vor.

SCENE IV.— : The same—Enter Jacquino, two Officers, and Soldiers with torches.

Jac.

[ Speaks during a pause in the music. ] Rocco, the minister is coming: He and his suite have already arrived at the postern.

Edition: current; Page: [22]
Roc.

[ Joyfully surprised—aside. ] Praised be God! He’s happily arrived! [ Aloud. ] We come! The soldiers shall ascend, and with lighted torches hence accompany the Governor.

[ The Soldiers come down to the door.—Exeunt Officers and Jacquino.

Piz.
  • No longer is there hope for me!
  • Hell mocks!
  • I must be firm, or fell despair
  • Will be my future lot.
Roc.
  • Oh! Heaven! his great arrogance
  • Makes me tremble yet.
  • No longer shall I be
  • In league with this fell tyrant.
Leo. & Flo.
  • { The moment of avenge
  • { For us at length hath come.
  • { The triumph of my/her constancy
  • { In his/her love I now shall find.

[ Pizarro rushes away, giving Rocco a sign to follow him. The latter avails himself of the opportunity to grasp the hands of Leonora and Florestan, presses them to his bosom, points to Heaven, and then hasting after him.

AUFTRITT V.— : Leonore, Florestan.

Flo.

Treues Weib! was hast du meinetwegen erdullet?

Leo.
  • Nichts, nichts! mein Florestan!

SCENE V.— : Leonora, Florestan.

Flo.

My ever-faithful Leonora! for me how much hast thou suffered?

Leo.
  • Oh! nothing, my own dear Florestan!
lf1422_figure_009.jpg
Edition: current; Page: [23]
lf1422_figure_010.jpg

O NAMENLOSE FREUDE! —OH, JOY! OH, RAPTURE PAST EXPRESSING. Durt. Florestan and Leonora.

Leo.
  • Du wieder nun in meinen Armen.
Flo.
  • Gott! wie gross ist dein Erbarmen
Beide.
  • O Gott! dir Dank! für diese Lust!
Leo.
  • Mein Mann an dieser Brust!
Flo.
  • Mein Weib an meiner Brust!
Leo
  • Once again in these fond arms!
Flo.
  • Heaven has kindly heard our prayer!
Both.
  • Oh, thus our thanks we raise!
Leo.
  • Life can boast no greater charms!
Flo.
  • Oh, now no more will we despair.

AUFTRITT VI.— : Die Vorigen. Rokko.

Rok.

[ hereinstürzend. ] Gute Bothschaft! thr armen Leidenden! Der Herr Minister hat eine Liste aller Gefangenen—alle sollen ihm vorgeführt werden. [ Zu Florestan. ] Ihr allein sevd nicht erwähnt; euer Aufenthalt hier, is eine Eigenmächtigkeit des Gouverneurs. Kommt, folget mir hinauf.

[ Alle drei ab.

SCENE VI.— : The same.—Enter Rocco.

Roc.

Good news! my poor sufferers! The Minister has a list of all of you, who are forthwith to appear before him. [ To Florestan. ] You are not named. Your imprisonment has evidently been unknown to the Minister, and is a stretch of arbitrary power, no doubt. Come, follow me all, follow me!

[ Exeunt.

AUFTRITT VII.— : Paradeplatz des Schlosses mit der Statue des Königs. Die Schlosswachen marschieren auf und bilden ein offenes Viereck. Dann erscheint der Minister, Don Fernando, von Pizarro und Offizieren beqleitet, von der einen Seite. Volk strömt herbei Von der andern Seite erscheinen, von Jaquino und Marzellinen beqleitet, die Staats-qefanqenen. Sie werfen sich alle vor Don Fernando auf die Knie. Später dringt Rokko mit Florestan und Leonoren sich durch das Volk und durch die Wachen.

SCENE VII.— : Parade before the Castle. Enter the Guard, marching; then the Minister, Don Fernando, accompanied on one side by Pizarro and Officers. The People crowd around. On the other side appear the State Prisoners, accompanied by Jacquino and Marcellina. They all throw themselves on their knees before Don Fernando. Afterwards Rocco, with Florestan, press through the Guard and the People.

Finale.
Chor der Gefangenen und des Volks.

  • Heil sey dem Tag! Heil sey der Stunde;
  • Da, lang ersehnt, doch unvereint.
  • Gerechtigkeit mit Huld im Bunde,
  • Vor unsers Grabes Thor erschient.
Fer.
  • Des besten Königs Wink und Wille!
  • Führt mich zu Euch, ihr Armen her,
  • Das ich der Frevel Naeht enthülle,
  • Die All’ umfangen schwarz und schwer.
  • Nicht länger knieet sclavisch nieder.
  • Tyrannenstrenge sey mir fern;
  • Es sucht der Bruder seine Brüder,
  • Und kann er helfen, hilft er geru.

Finale.
Chorus of Prisoners and People.

  • Thanks, thanks, and all hail!
  • To him who comes our chains to sunder.
  • Justice comes, at length, to give us
  • Long-lost liberty!
Fer.
  • Of a gracious King I am the Minister,
  • And of Justice the humble instrument:
  • He desires not to oppress,
  • But to check crimes by fitting punishment.
  • Though under his just anger fallen,
  • His beneficence you shall now experience:
  • From chains and bolts he sets you free,
  • Once more you are at liberty.

AUFTRITT VIII.— : Die Vorigen. Rokko Leonore und Florestan.

Rok.
  • Wohlan! so helfet, helft den Armen!
Piz.
  • Was seh ich? ha!
Rok.
  • Bewegt es dich?
Piz.
  • Fort! fort!
Fer.
  • Nein, rede!
Rok.
  • All Erbarmen
  • Vereine diesem Paare sich!
  • [ Florestan vorführend.
  • Don Florestan!
Fer.
  • Der Todtgeglaubte?
  • Der Edle, der für Wahrheit stritt?
Rok.
  • Und Qualen, ohne Zahl, erlitt.
Fer.
  • Mein Freund! der Todtgeglaubte!
  • Gefesselt, bleich, steht er vor mir.
Rok. Leo. }
  • Ja, Florestan! Ihr seht ihn hier.
Rok.
  • Und Leonore! [ Sie vorstellend.
Fer.
  • [ noch mehr betroffen. ] Leonore?
Rok.
  • Der Frauen Zierde führ’ ich vor;
  • Sie kam hierher—
Piz.
  • Zwei Worte sagen—
Fer.
  • [ zu Pizarro. ] Kein Wort!
  • [ zu Rokko. ] Sie kam?—
Rok.
  • Dort an mein Thor,
  • Und trat als Knecht in meine Dienste,
  • Und that so brave, treue Dienste,
  • Dass ich zum Eidam sie erkor!
Mar.
  • O weh mir! was vernimmt mein Ohr?
Rok.
  • Der Unmensch wollt in dieser Stunde
  • An Florestan vollziehn den Mord.
Piz.
  • Vollziehn!—Mit ihm—
Rok. [ auf sich und Leonoren deutend. ]
  • Mit uns im Bunde!
  • Nur Euer Kommen rief ihn fort.
Cho.
  • Bestrafet sey der Bösewicht,
  • Der Unschuld unterdrückt:
  • Gerechtigkeit hält zum Gericht
  • Der Rache Schwerdt gezückt.
Flo. [ zu Rokko. ]
  • Du schlossest auf des Edlen Grab,
  • Jetzt nimm ihm seine Ketten ab!
  • Doch halt!—Euch, edle Frau, allein
  • Euch ziemt es ganz ihn zu befrien.
  • [ Leonore nimmt die Schlüssel, lässt in grösster Bewegung Florestan die Ketten ab: er sinkt in Leonorens Arme.
Leo.
  • O Gott! o welch ein Augenblick!
Flo.
  • O unaussprechlich süsses Glück!
Fer.
  • Gerecht, o Gott! ist dein Gericht!
Rok. Mar. }
  • Du prüfest, du verlässt uns nicht.
Cho.
  • Wer ein solches Weib errungen,
  • Stimm in unsern Jubel ein!
  • Nie wird es zu hoch besungen,
  • Retterinn des Gatten seyn.
Flo.
  • Deine Treu erhielt mein Leben;
  • Tugend schreckt den Bösewicht.
Leo.
  • Liebe führte mein Bestreben,
  • Wahre Liebe fürchtet nicht.
Cho.
  • Preist mit hoher Freude Gluth
  • Leonorens edlen Muth.
Flo. [ vortretend und auf Leonoren deutend. ]
  • Wer ein solches Weib errungen,
  • Stimm in unsern Jubel ein!
  • Nie wird es zu hoch besungen,
  • Retterinn des Gatten seyn.
Leo [ umarmt ihm. ]
  • Liebend ist es mir gelungen,
  • Dich aus Ketten zu befreien;
  • Liebend seh es hoch gesungen,
  • Florestan ist wieder mein!
Rok. und Cho. {
  • Wer ein solches Weib errungen,
  • Stimm in unsern Jubel ein!
  • Nie wird es zu hoch besungen,
  • Retterinn des Gatten seyn.

SCENE VIII.— : The same. Rocco, Leonora and Florestan.

Roc.
  • There, all will be well—help the poor captive!
Piz.
  • What do I see? Ha!
Roc.
  • Does it surprise thee?
Edition: current; Page: [24]
Piz.
  • Away! away!
Fer.
  • No—speak!
Roc.
  • For mercy’s sake, have pity on
  • And re-unite this hapless pair!
  • [ Florestan advances
  • Don Florestan!
Fer.
  • He that was supposed to be dead?
  • Who so bravely fought for truth and right?
Roc.
  • And who has suffered torments inconceivable
Fer.
  • My friend! whom I thought dead!
  • Yet standing thus exhausted and in chains!
Roc. Leo. }
  • Yes, it is Florestan whom you now behold!
Roc.
  • And Leonora! [ Presenting her.
Fer.
  • [ Still more affected. ] Leonora!
Roc.
  • I present a woman, the pride and ornament
  • Of her sex; she came hither—
Piz.
  • [ Threateningly. ] Speak but two words—
Fer.
  • [ To Pizarro. ] Not a syllable.
  • [ To Rocco. ] She came?—
Roc.
  • Here, to my gate;—
  • She entered my service as a hireling lad,
  • And served me so well and faithfully,
  • That I chose the unknown for my son-in-law.
Mar.
  • Oh, woe’s me! what do I hear?
Roc.
  • The monster, within this very hour,
  • Had planned to do a deed of murder on Florestan.
Piz.
  • Murder! on him!
Roc. [ Pointing to himself and Leonora. ]
  • Yes, my lord! he sought to involve us in his crime,
  • But your arrival upset his plans.
Cho.
  • Punishment befall the wretch
  • Who oppresses the innocent;
  • Justice holds aloft, for punishment,
  • The sword of Revenge.
Fer. [ To Rocco. ]
  • His threatened death has been averted!
  • Now, take off his chains!—yet, stay!
  • You, heroic woman! you, alone, deserve
  • The happiness completely to set him free!
  • [ Leonora takes the keys, and, in great agitation, unfastens the chains which bound Florestan: who rushes into Leonora’s arms.
Leo.
  • Oh, what a moment!
Flo.
  • Oh, happiness inexpressible!
Fer.
  • O heaven! how just are all thy judgments!
Roc. Mar. }
  • Thou triest—but dost not forsake.
Cho.
  • Whoever has possessed such a partner of his heart,
  • Let him join in our jubilee!
  • Never can the praise be too loudly sounded
  • Of the wife that is the preserver of her husband!
Flo.
  • Thy fidelity has restored me to life!
  • Thy virtues have unnerved the wicked!
Leo.
  • Love guided my endeavors,—
  • Such true love as never knows fear
Cho.
  • Celebrate, in joyous measure,
  • Leonora’s noble courage.
Flo. [ Advancing, and pointing to Leonora. ]
  • Whoever has possessed such a partner of his heart,
  • Let him join in our jubilee!
  • Never can the praise be too loudly sounded,
  • Of the wife that is the preserver of her husband!
Leo. [ Embracing him. ]
  • Having succeeded in delivering
  • You from captivity!—Loving and beloved!
  • Loudly let it be proclaimed!
  • Florestan is again mine own!
Roc. and Cho. {
  • Whoever has possessed such a partner of his heart,
  • Let him join in our jubilee!
  • Never can the praise be too loudly sounded
  • Of the wife that is the preserver of her husband!
THE END.