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Coke: Selected Readings on Sir Edward Coke

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Source: The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2003). Vol. 3.

Selected Readings Concerning of the Life, Career, and Legacy of Sir Edward Coke 1

I. Coke’s Life and Career

  • Alward, Silas. “Coke: The Great Oracle of the Common Law.” The Canadian Law Times 32 (1912): 929.
  • Aubrey, John. “Sir Edward Coke.” In “Brief Lives,” Chiefly of Contemporaries, set down by John Aubrey, between the Years 1669 & 1696, edited by Andrew Clark. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1898. (Three lines relating to the false allegations of Lady Hatton’s pregnancy at the time of her marriage to Coke have been suppressed in this edition.)
  • Birkenhead, Earl of [Frederick E. Smith]. “Sir Edward Coke.” In Fourteen English Judges. New York: Cassell, 1926.
  • Barnes, Thomas G. “Notes from the Editors.” Two Companion Pamphlets to The First Part of the Institutes of the Laws of England. Delran, N.J.: Legal Classics, 1995. (A facsimile reprint of the 18th edition of 1823.)
  • Bowen, Catherine Drinker. “Coke and the Carson Collection.” In Four Talks for Bibliophiles. Philadelphia: Free Library of Philadelphia, 1958.
  • ———. “Five against the Odds: How do Great Men Cope with Old Age? By Starting Over.” 16 Horizons (1974): 78
  • ———. The Lion and the Throne: The Life and Times of Sir Edward Coke (1552–1634). Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1957.
  • ———. “The Lord of the Law.” American Heritage 8 (1957): 4.
  • Boyer, Allen D. Law, Liberty, and Parliament: Selected Essays on the Writings of Sir Edward Coke. Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2004.
  • Burke, Edmund Plunkett, Sir Edward Coke. London: Baldwin and Cradock, 1833.
  • Campbell, Lord John. “Life of Sir Edward Coke.” In The Lives of the Chief Justices of England: From the Norman Conquest till the Death of Lord Mansfield. London: John Murray, 1849–57.
  • Clark, Walter, Coke, Blackstone, and the Common Law. Rochester, N.Y.: The Lawyers Co-operative Publishing Co., 1918.
  • Coke, Edward. Vade Mecum. In Collectanea Topographica et Geneologica. London: J. B. Nichols and Son, 1834–43. Taken by John Bruce from Coke’s introductory leaves in his private manual. (The reader is cautioned to ignore dates Anno Domini in this edition which may have been mistakenly converted from regnal years. The manuscript is in the British Museum, Harleian MS. 6687, and is admirably described in John Baker’s article “Coke’s Note-Books,” listed below in section H. 1. Further autobiographical notes by Coke are in the Holkham mss.)
  • Foss, Edward. “Edward Coke.” In The Judges of England: With Sketches of Their Lives, and Miscellaneous Notices Connected with the Courts at Westminster, from the Time of the Conquest. London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1848–64.
  • Hahn, Edgar Aaron. Edward Coke. Rowfantia, no. 14. Cleveland: The Rowfant Club, 1949. Hill, Christopher. “Sir Edward Coke-Myth-Maker.” In Intellectual Origins of the English Revolution. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1965.
  • Holdsworth, Sir William. “The Influence of Sir Edward Coke on the Development of English Law.” In Essays in Legal History Read before the International Congress Held in London in 1913, edited by Paul Vinogradoff. London, New York: Oxford University Press, 1913; In A History of English Law. 2d ed. Boston: Little, Brown, 1937.
  • ———. “Sir Edward Coke.” Cambridge Law Journal 5 (1935): 332.
  • ———. Some Makers of English Law. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1966.
  • Hostettler, John. Sir Edward Coke: A Force for Freedom. Chichester: Barry Rose, 1998.
  • James, Charles Warburton. Chief Justice Coke, His Family & Descendants at Holkham. London: Country Life Ltd.; New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1929.
  • Johnson, Cuthbert William. The Life of Sir Edward Coke, Lord Chief Justice of England, with Memoirs of His Contemporaries. London: Henry Colburn, 1837.
  • Jones, Martin David. “Sir Edward Coke and the Interpretation of Lawful Allegiance in Seventeenth Century England.” History of Political Thought 7 (1986): 321.
  • Kippis, Andrew. Biographia Britannica; Or, the Lives of the Most Eminent Persons Who Have Flourished in Great Britain and Ireland, from the Earliest Ages, Down to the Present Times: Collected from the Best Authorities, Printed and Manuscript, and Digested in the Manner of Mr. Bayle’s Historical and Critical Dictionary. London: W. and A. Strahan, for C. Bathurst, W. Strahan, etc., 1778–93.
  • “Letter . . . to sir Thomas Lake, relating to the proceedings of sir Edward Coke at Oatland and ii. Documents relating to sir Walter Raleigh’s last voyage. Communicated to the Camden miscellany by S.R. Gardiner.” Camden Miscellany. 5 (1864).
  • Lyon, Walter Hastings, and Herman Block. Edward Coke, Oracle of the Law: Containing the Story of His Long Rivalry with Francis Bacon; Some Account of Their Times and Contemporaries; Famous Trials in Which Coke Participated; His Stand Against King James I to Maintain the Supremacy of the Common Law. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1929.
  • MacKinnon, Sir Frank Douglas. Record of a Tercentenary Commemoration of Sir Edward Coke (1551–1634). London, 1934. Reprinted in “Sir Edward Coke: I. Inner Temple.” Law Quarterly Review 51 (1935): 289; Inner Temple Papers. London: Stevens, 1948.
  • McDonnell, George P. “Sir Edward Coke.” In Dictionary of National Biography: From the Earliest Times to 1900. Edited by Sir Leslie Stephen and Sir Sidney Lee. London: Oxford University Press, 1921–1922.
  • Record of Honor and Virtue: The Noble Memorial of the Right Honorable Sir Edward Coke, Knight, Sometimes Lord Chief Justice of England and Attorney General to Queen Elizabeth, Who Departed This Transitory Life at His Manor of Stoke in Buckinghamshire This September 1634. (Eulogy, dedicatedtohisdaughter,Mrs. Anne Sadlier) (HLS MS 4125, Harvard Law School Library.)
  • Roscoe, Henry. Eminent British Lawyers. London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1830.
  • Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge. Lives of Eminent Persons, Consisting of Galileo, Kepler, Newton, Mahomet, Wolsey, Sir E. Coke, Lord Somers, Caxton,Blake, Adam Smith, Niebuhr, Sir C. Wren, and Michael Angelo. London: R. Baldwin, 1833.
  • Thorne, Samuel E. Sir Edward Coke, 1552–1952. The Selden Society Lecture, 1952. London: Brenard Quaritch, 1957.
  • ——— Essays in Legal History. London: Hambledon Press, 1985.
  • Usher, Ronald G. “Sir Edward Coke.” St. Louis Law Review 15 (1930): 325.
  • Windeyer, W. J. V. “Sir Edward Coke.” In Lectures on Legal History. Sydney: Law Book of Australasia Pt. Ltd., 1949.
  • Woolrych, Humphry W. The Life of the Right Honourable Sir Edward Coke, Knt., Lord Chief Justice of the King’s Bench. London: J. & W. T. Clarke, 1826.
  • Wrangham, Francis. “Sir Edward Coke.” In The British Plutarch Containing the Lives of the Most Eminent Divines, Patriots, Statesmen, Warriors, Philosophers, Poets, and Artists, of Great Britain and Ireland from the Accession of Henry VIII to the Present Time. 6 vols. London: J. Mawman, and Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy, 1816.

II. Topical Commentaries

A. Coke’s Tools

1. Language

  • Boyer, Allen D. “Sir Edward Coke, Ciceronianus: Classical Rhetoric and the Commo Law Tradition.” International Journal for the Semiotics of Law/Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 10 (1997): 3.
  • Disraeli, Isaac. “Of Coke’s Style, and His Conduct.” In Curiosities of Literature. New York: J. Widdleton, 1872.
  • Hornstein, L. H. “Some Chaucer Allusions by Sir Edward Coke.” Modern Language Notes 60 (1945): 483.
  • Howell, W. S. Rhetoric and Logic in England 1500–1700. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1956.
  • Shoeck, R. J. “Rhetoric and Law in Fifteenth-Century England.” Studies in Philology 50 (1953): 110.

2. Books

  • Abbot, L. W. Law Reporting in England, 1485–1585. London: Athlone Press, 1973.
  • Hassal, W. O., ed. A Catalogue of the Library of Sir Edward Coke. Preface by Samuel Thorne. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1950.
  • James, C. W. “Some Notes on the Library of Printed Books at Holkham.” Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, n.s., 11 (1931): 435.
  • ———. “Some Notes upon the Manuscript Library at Holkham.” The Library, 4th ser., 2 (1922): 213.
  • Lewis, Clive S. [C. S.] English Literature in the Sixteenth Century Excluding Drama. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1954.
  • Stebbings, Chantal, ed. Law Reporting in England. London: Hambledon Press, 1995.
  • Topulos, Katherine. “A Common Lawyer’s Bookshelf Recreated: An Annotated Bibliography of a Collection of Sixteenth-Century English Law Books.” Law Library Journal 84 (1992): 641.

3. History

  • Fussner, F. Smith. The Historical Revolution: English Historical Writing and Thought, 1580–1640. London: Routledge and Paul, 1962.
  • Goodrich, Peter. “Doctor Duxbury’s Cure: Or, a Note on Legal Historiography.” Cardozo Law Review 15 (1994): 1567.
  • ———. “Poor Illiterate Reason: History, Nationalism and Common Law.” Social & Legal Studies 1 (1992): 7.
  • Ross, Richard J. “The Memorial Culture of Early Modern English Lawyers: Memory as Keyword, Shelter, and Identity, 1560–1640.” Yale Journal of Law & the Humanities 10 (1998): 229.
  • Woolf, D. R. The Idea of History in Early Stuart England: Erudition, Ideology, and “The Light of Truth” from the Accession of James I to the Civil War. Toronto:University of Toronto Press, 1990.

4. Law

  • Aumann, Francis Robert. “Lord Coke: The Compleat Student of the Common Law.” Kentucky Law Journal 17 (1930): 64.
  • Jamieson, David F. “Custom, Reason and Legislation in the Thought of Sir Edward Coke.” Ph.D. diss., University of Utah, 1978.
  • McQuade, J. Stanley. “Medieval ‘Ratio’ and Modern Formal Studies: A Reconsideration of Coke’s Dictum That Law Is the Perfection of Reason.” American Journal of Jurisprudence 38 (1993): 359.
  • Singer, Barbara A. “The Reason of the Common Law.” University of Miami Law Review 37 (1983): 797.
  • Thorne, Samuel E. “Courts of Record and Sir Edward Coke.” University of Toronto Law Journal 2 (1937): 24.
  • ———. Essays in Legal History. London: Hambledon Press, 1985.

B. Judges and the Common Law

  • Baker, J. H. “The Structure of a Court.” In The Legal Profession and the Common Law: Historical Essays. London: Hambledon Press, 1986.
  • Berman, Harold. “The Origins of Historical Jurisprudence: Coke, Selden, and Hale.” Yale Law Journal 103 (1994): 1651.
  • Cantor, Norman F. Imagining the Law. New York: Harper Collins, 1997.
  • Clark, Walter. “Coke, Blackstone, and the Common Law.” Case and Comment 24 (1918): 861.
  • Coquillette, Daniel R. The Anglo-American Legal Heritage: Introductory Materials. Durham, North Carolina: Carolina Academic Press, 1999.
  • Francis, Clinton W. “The Structure of Judicial Administration and the Development of Contract Law in Seventeenth-Century England.” Columbia Law Review 83 (1983): 35.
  • Glen, Garrard. “Edward Coke and Law Restatement.” Virginia Law Review 17 (1931): 447.
  • Goedecke, W. Robert. “Edward Coke, Francis Bacon, and the Foundations of Law.” In Change and the Law. Tallahassee: Florida State University Press, 1969.
  • Goldberg, Ronnie Lee. “Sir Edward Coke and the Common Law.” Ph.D. diss., University of Chicago, 1978.
  • Gray, Charles. “Reason, Authority, and Imagination: The Jurisprudence of Sir Edward Coke.” In Culture and Politics from Puritanism to the Enlightenment, edited by Perez Zagorin. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980.
  • Hale, Sir Matthew. Introduction to The History of the Common Law of England, by Charles M. Gray. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1971.
  • Holdsworth, William S. “The Influence of Coke on the Development of English Law.” In Essays in Legal History, edited by Paul Vinogradoff. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1914.
  • Ives, E. W. “Social Change and the Law.” In The English Revolution, 1600–1660. New York: Barnes & Noble, 1969.
  • Kenyon, J. P. “The Judiciary.” In The Stuart Constitution, 1603–1688: Documents and Commentary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1966.
  • Lewis, John Underwood. “Sir Edward Coke (1552–1633): His Theory of ‘Artificial Reason’ as a Context for Modern Basic Legal Theory.” Law Quarterly Review 84 (1968): 330.
  • Milsom, S. F. C. Historical Foundations of the Common Law. London: Butterworths, 1969.
  • Powell, Jim. “An Independent Judiciary.” In The Triumph of Liberty: A 2,000-year History Told Through the Lives of Freedom’s Greatest Champions. New York: Free Press, 2000.
  • Prest, Wilfrid R. The Inns of Court under Elizabeth I and the Early Stuarts, 1590–1640. London: Longman, 1972.
  • ———. The Rise of the Barristers: A Social History of the English Bar, 1590–1640. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991.
  • Simpson, A. W. B. The History of the Common Law of Contract: The Rise of the Action of Assumpsit. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1975.
  • ———. A History of the Land Law. 2d ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1986.
  • Stumpf, Samuel Enoch. “Sir Edward Coke: Advocate of the Supremacy of the Law.” Vanderbilt Studies in the Humanities 1 (1951): 34.
  • Thorne, Samuel E. “Tudor Social Transformation and Legal Change.” New York University Law Review 26 (1951): 10.
  • ———. Essays in Legal History. London: Hambledon Press, 1985.

C. Competition with Other Benches

  • Baker, John H. “The Common Lawyers and the Chancery: 1616.” Irish Jurist, n.s. 4 (1969): 368.
  • ———. The Legal Profession and the Common Law: Historical Essays. London: Hambledon Press, 1986.
  • Cumming, Charles S. “The English High Court of Admiralty.” The Maritime Lawyer 17 (1992): 209.
  • De Smith, S. A. “The Prerogative Writs.” Cambridge Law Journal 11 (1951): 40.
  • Fortier, Mark. “Equity and Ideas: Coke, Ellesmere, and James I.” Renaissance Quarterly 51 (1998): 1255.
  • Gray, Charles M. “The Boundaries of the Equitable Function.” American Journal of Legal History 20 (1976): 192.
  • ———. “Prohibitions and the Privilege Against Self-Incrimination.” In Tudor Rule and Revolution: Essays for G. R. Elton from His American Friends, edited by DeLloyd J. Guth and John W. McKenna. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982.
  • ———. The Writ of Prohibition: Jurisdiction in Early Modern English Law. New York: Oceana Publications, 1994.
  • Greene, Douglas G. “The Court of the Marshalsea in Late Tudor and Stuart England.” American Journal of Legal History (1976): 267.
  • Harrington, Matthew P. “The Legacy of the Colonial Vice-Admiralty Courts (Part I).” Journal of Maritime Law & Commerce 26 (1995): 581.
  • Jones, W. J. The Elizabethan Court of Chancery. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1967.
  • Levy, Leonard W. “Origins of the Fifth Amendment and Its Critics.” Cardozo Law Review 19 (1997): 821.
  • MaGuire, M. H. “The Attack of the Common Lawyers on the Oath Ex Officio.” In Essays in Honor of C. H. McIlwaind. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1936.
  • Usher, Roland G. The Rise and Fall of the High Commission. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1968.

D. Administrative Law and Management of the Bench and Bar

  • Cohen, Maxwell. “Some Considerations on the Origins of Habeas Corpus.” Canadian Bar Review 16 (1938): 92.
  • ———. “Habeas Corpus cum Causa—The Emergence of the Modern Writ.” Canadian Bar Review 18 (1940): 10.
  • De Smith, S. A. “Wrongs and Remedies in Administrative Law.” Modern Law Review 15 (1952): 189.
  • Henderson, Edith G. Foundations of English Administrative Law: Certiorari and Mandamus in the Seventeenth Century. Cambridge: Ames Foundations, 1963.
  • Milsom, S. F. C. “The Origins and Early History of Judicial Review in England.” Ph.D. diss. University of Cambridge, 1957.
  • Pollack, Malla. “Purveyance and Power, or Over-Priced Free Lunch: The Intellectual Property Clause as an Ally of the Takings Clause in the Public’s Control of Government.” Southwestern University Law Review 30 (2000): 1.
  • Rose, Jonathan. “The Legal Profession in Medieval England: A History of Regulation.” Syracuse Law Review 48 (1998): 1.
  • Schwartz Bernard. Lions over the Throne: The Judicial Revolution in English Administrative Law. New York: New York University Press, 1987.
  • Winfield, Percy Henry. The History of Conspiracy and Abuse of Legal Procedure. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1921.

E. Judicial Review

  • Boudin, Louis B. “Lord Coke and the American Doctrine of Judicial Power.” New York University Law Review 6 (1928–29): 233.
  • Boyer, Allen Dillard. “Undersanding, Authority, and Will: Sir Edward Coke and the Elizabethan Origins of Judicial Review.” Boston College Law Review 39 (1997): 43. Easterbrook Frank. “Substance and Due Process.” Supreme Court Review (1982): 85.
  • Hamburger, Philip A. “Revolution and Judicial Review: Chief Justice Holt’s Opinion in City of London v. Wood.” Columbia Law Review 94 (1994): 2091.
  • Jaffe Louis L., and Edith G. Henderson. “Judicial Review and the Rule of Law: Historical Origins.” Law Quarterly Review 72 (1956): 345.
  • Lloyd, Aaron. “Lord Cooke’s Fundamental Rights, and the Institution of Substantive Judicial Review.” Auckland University Law Review 8 (1999): 1172.
  • Nelson, William E. Marbury v. Madison: The Origins and Legacy of Judicial Review. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2000.
  • Orth, John V. “Did Sir Edward Coke Mean What He Said?” Constitutional Commentary 33 (1999): 16.

F. Judicial Independence

  • Black, Barbara A. “Massachusetts and the Judges: Judicial Independence in Perspective.” Law & History Review 3 (1985): 101.
  • Cox, Archibald. “The Independence of the Judiciary: History And Purposes.” University of Dayton Law Review 21 (1996): 565.
  • Hoffman, Jonathan M. “By the Course of the Law: The Origins of the Open Courts Clause of State Constitutions.” Oregon Law Review 74 (1995): 1279.
  • Lederman, William R. “The Independence of the Judiciary.” Parts 1, 2. Canadian Bar, Review 34 (1956): 769, 1139.
  • Lemmings, David. “The Independence of the Judiciary in Eighteenth-Century England.” In The Life of the Law: Proceedings of the Tenth British Legal History Conference, edited by Peter Birks, 126. London: Hambledon Press, 1993.
  • Noonan, John T. “The John Dewey Memorial Lecture: Education, Intelligence, and Character in Judges.” Minnesota Law Review 71 (1987): 1119.
  • Redish, Martin H., and Lawrence C. Marshall. “Adjudicatory Independence and the Values of Procedural Due Process.” Yale Law Journal 95 (1986): 455.
  • Riggs, Burkeley N., and Tamera D. Westerberg. “Judicial Independence: An Historical Perspective.” Denver University Law Review 74 (1997): 337.
  • Roth, Philip J. “The Dangerous Erosion of Judicial Immunity.” Brief 18 (1989): 26.
  • Ziskind, Martha A. “Judicial Tenure in the American Constitution: English and American Precedents.” Supreme Court Review (1969): 135.

G. The English Constitution

  • Allen, J. W. English Political Thought, 1603–1660. 2 vols. London: Methuen & Co. Ltd., 1938.
  • Beaute, Jean. Un Grand Juriste Anglais, Sir Edward Coke, 1552–1634: Ses Idées Politiques et Constitutionnelles: Ou, Aux Origines De La Democratie Occidentale Moderne. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1975.
  • Burgess, Glenn. The Politics of the Ancient Constitution: An Introduction to English Political Thought, 1603–1642. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1992.
  • ———. “The Political Thought of Edward Coke.” In Absolute Monarchy and the Stuart Constitution. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1996.
  • Eusden, John Dykstra. Puritans, Lawyers, and Politics. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1958.
  • Freidrich, Carl J. “Common Law against Natural Law: James I, Edward Coke, and Francis Bacon.” In The Philosophy of Law in Historical Perspective. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1957.
  • Hill, Christopher. The Century of Revolution, 1603–1714. Edinburgh: T. Nelson, 1961.
  • Jones, William J. “The Crown and the Courts in England, 1603–1625.” In The Reign of James VI and I, edited by Alan G. R. Smith. London: St. Martin’s Press, 1973.
  • Kelley, Donald R. “Elizabethan Political Thought.” In The Varieties of British Political Thought, 1500–1800, edited by J. G. A. Pocock. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993.
  • Klein, William. “The Ancient Constitution Revisited.” In Political Discourse in Early Modern Britain, edited by Nicholas Phillipson and Quentin Skinner. Cambridge: Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993.
  • Maitland, Frederic William. The Constitutional History of England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1908.
  • Montague, F. C. The Political History of England from the Accession of James I to the Restoration (1603–1660). 2d ed. New York: Longmans, Green & Co., 1911.
  • Ogilvie, Sir Charles. King’s Government and the Common Law, 1471–1641. Oxford: Blackwell, 1958.
  • Pocock, J. G. A. The Ancient Constitution and the Feudal Law: A Study of English Historical Thought in the Seventeenth Century. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1957 (new ed. 1987).
  • Russell, Conrad. “Divine Rights in the Early Seventeenth Century.” In Public Duty and Private Conscience in Seventeenth Century England: Essays Presented to G. E. Aylmer, edited by John Morrill, Paul Slack, and Daniel Woolf. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993.
  • Sourzh, Gerald. “Constitution: Changing Meanings of the Term from the Early Seventeenth to the Late Eighteenth Century.” In Conceptual Change and the Constitution, edited by Terence Ball and J. G. A. Pocock. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1988.
  • Tanner, J. R. “Constitutional Questions in the Parliaments of James I.” In English Constitutional Conflicts of the Seventeenth Century, 1603–1689. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1928.
  • Wormuth, Francis D. The Royal Prerogative, 1603–1649: A Study in English Political and Constitutional Ideas. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1939.

H. Coke’s Writings and Cases

  • Bridgman, Richard Whalley. A Short View of Legal Bibliography: Containing Some Critical Observations on the Authority of the Reporters and Other Law Writers; Collected from the Best Authorities . . . London: W. Reed, 1807.
  • Gest, John Marshall. “The Writings of Sir Edward Coke.” Yale Law Journal 18 (1909): 504.
  • ———. The Lawyer in Literature. Boston: Boston Book Co., 1913.
  • Gray, Charles M. Copyhold, Equity, and the Common Law. Harvard Historical Monographs, vol. 53. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1963.
  • Hicks, Frederick Charles. Men and Books Famous in the Law. Rochester, N.Y.: The Lawyers Co-operative Publishing Co., 1921.
  • Holdsworth, W. S. Sources and Literature of English Law. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1928.
  • Ross, Richard J. “The Commoning of the Common Law: The Renaissance Debate over Printing English Law, 1520–1640.” University of Pennsylvania Law Review 146 (1998): 323.
  • Siegel, Stephen A. “The Aristotelian Basis of English Law, 1450–1800.” New York University Law Review 56 (1981): 18.

1. The Reports, Generally

  • Baker, J. H. “Coke’s Notebooks and the Sources of His Reports.” Cambridge Law Journal 30 (1972): 59.
  • ———. The Legal Profession and the Common Law: Historical Essays. London: Hambledon Press, 1986.
  • Dawson, John P. “The Named Reporters (1535–1790).” In Oracles of the Law. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Law School, 1968.
  • Jenkins, David. Eight Centuries of Reports; Or, Eight Hundred Cases Solemnly Adjudged in the Exchequer Chamber, Or, upon Writs of Error. 4th ed. Edited by Charles Francis Morrell. Translated by Theodore Barlow. London: H. Sweet & Sons, 1885.
  • Plucknett, T. F. T. “The Genesis of Coke’s Reports.” In Studies in English Legal History 15 (1985): 190. (First published in Cornell Law Review 17 (1942): 190.)
  • Sheppard, Steve, “Introduction to the 1826 Edition.” In Edward Coke, The Reports of Sir Edward Coke in Thirteen Parts. Union, N.J.: Lawbook Exchange, 2002 (reprint of 1826 edition).
  • Veerder, Van Vechten. “The English Reports, 1292–1865.” Harvard Law Review 15 (1901): 11.
  • Worrall, John, ed. The Reports of Sir Edward Coke, Kt., in Verse. Wherein the Name of Each Case, and the Principal Points, Are Contained in Two Lines. To Which Are Added, References in the Margin to All the Editions of the Said Reports; and Two Tables, One of the Names of the Cases, and the Other of the Principal Matters. London: H.
  • Lintot, 1742. Third edition, edited by J. Wesley Miller, published by William S. Hein, 1999. (It is not certain, but it is possible that the original verse renderings, likely enlarged in this edition, are the poetry written by Coke for his children, as recorded in the Lambeth mss inventory of items seized from Coke’s servant Pepys. This theory is propounded by Lord Campbell. Campbell Lives of the Chief Justices I:336 n. The verses are bad enough, and Coke’s ambivalence toward rhyming poets was strong enough, that it might be true. J. Wesley Miller, the recent editor of the Reports in Verse, hypothesizes authorship by poet Giles Jacob (1688–1744).)

2. Particular Cases

  • William Aldred’s Case (9 Reports 57b), p. 308
  • Coquillette, Daniel R. “Mosses from an Old Manse: Another Look at Some Historic Property Cases about the Environment.” Cornell Law Review 64 (1979): 761.
  • Smith, George P. “Nuisance Law: The Morphogenesis of an Historical Revisionist Theory of Contemporary Economic Jurisprudence.” Nebraska Law Review 74 (1995): 658.
  • Christianson v. Snohomish Health Dist., 946 P. 2d 768 (Wash. 1997).
  • Prawner v. Battle Creek Co-op Creamery, 113 N. W. 2d 518 (Neb. 1962).
  • James Bagg’s Case (11 Reports 93a), p. 404
  • Gilmore, Michael S. “Standing Law in Idaho: A Constitutional Wrong Turn.” Idaho Law Review 31 (1995): 509.
  • Case of the Bankrupts (2 Reports 25a), p. 45
  • Weisberg, Robert. “Commercial Morality, the Merchant Character, and the History of the Voidable Preference.” Stanford Law Review 39 (1986): 3.
  • (Bates’s Case) Customs, Subsidies, and Impositions (12 Reports 33), p. 441
  • Elkins, Jeremy. “Constitutions and ‘Survivor Stories’: Declarations of Rights.” University of Chicago Law School Roundtable 3 (1996): 243.
  • Oakley, Francis. “Jacobean Political Theology: The Absolute and Ordinary Powers of the King.” Journal of the History of Ideas 29 (1968): 323.
  • Doctor Bonham’s Case (8 Co. Rep. 114), p. 264
  • Berger, Raoul. “Doctor Bonham’s Case: Statutory Construction or Constitutional Theory?” University of Pennsylvania Law Review 117 (1969): 521.
  • Cascarelli, Joseph C. “Is Judicial Review Grounded in and Limited by Natural Law?” Cumberland Law Review 30 (2000): 373.
  • Cook, Harold J. “Against Common Right and Reason: The Royal College of Physicians versus Doctor Thomas Bonham.” American Journal of Legal History 29 (1985): 301.
  • Gray, Charles M. “Bonham’s Case Reviewed.” Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 116 (1972): 35.
  • Grey, Thomas C. “Origins of the Unwritten Constitution: Fundamental Law in American Revolutionary Thought.” Stanford Law Review 30 (1978): 843.
  • Michael, Helen K. “The Role of Natural Law in Early American Constitutionalism: Did the Founders Contemplate Judicial Enforcement of ‘Unwritten’ Individual Rights?” North Carolina Law Review 69 (1991): 421.
  • Plucknett, Theodore. “Bonham’s Case and Judicial Review.” Harvard Law Review 40 (1926): 30.
  • Smith, George P. “Dr. Bonham’s Case and the Modern Significance of Lord Coke’s Influence.” Washington Law Review 41 (1966): 297.
  • Thorne, S. E. “Dr. Bonham’s Case.” Law Quarterly Review 54 (1938): 543.
  • California v. Green, 399 U.S. 149 (1970) (White, J., majority) (Harlan, J., concurring).
  • Collins v. Dixie Transport, Inc., 543 So. 2d 160 (Miss. 1989).
  • Dutton v. Evans, 400 U.S. 74 (1970).
  • McGowan v. Mississippi State Oil & Gas Bd., 604 So. 2d 312 (Miss. 1992).
  • Calvin’s Case, (7 Reports 1), p. 166
  • Bogen, David S. “The Individual Liberties Within the Body of the Constitution: A Symposium: The Privileges and Immunities Clause of Article IV.” Case Western Reserve Law Review 37 (1987): 794.
  • Carey, George W. “Liberty and the Fifth Amendment: Original Intent.” Benchmark 4 (1990): 301.
  • Flaherty, Martin Stephen. “Note: The Empire Strikes Back: Annesley v. Sherlock and the Triumph of Imperial Parliamentary Supremacy.” Columbia Law Review 87 (1987): 593.
  • Heyman, Steven J. “Constitutional Perspectives: The First Duty of Government: Protection, Liberty, and the Fourteenth Amendment.” Duke Law Journal 41 (1991): 507.
  • Houston, Michael Robert W. “Note: Birthright Citizenship in the United Kingdom and the United States: A Comparative Analysis of the Common Law Basis for Granting Citizenship to Children Born of Illegal Immigrants.” Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law 33 (2000): 693.
  • Jones, David Martin. “Sir Edward Coke and the Interpretation of Lawful Allegiance in Seventeenth Century England.” History of Political Thought 7 (1986): 321.
  • Kettner, James H. The Development of American Citizenship, 1608–1870. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1978.
  • McHugh, P. G. “The Common-Law Status of Colonies and Aboriginal ‘Rights’: How Lawyers and Historians Treat the Past.” Saskatchewan Law Review 61 (1998): 393.
  • O’Melinn, Liam Seamus. “Note: The American Revolution and Constitutionalism in the Seventeenth-Century West Indies.” Columbia Law Review 95 (1995): 104.
  • Price, Polly J. “Natural Law and Birthright Citizenship in Calvin’s Case.” Yale Journal of Law and the Humanities 9 (1997): 73.
  • Wheeler, Harvey. “Calvin’s Case (1608) andthe McIlwain-Schuyler Debate.”American Historical Review 61 (1956): 587.
  • Wilson, James. “Considerations on the Nature and Extent of the Legislative Authority of the British Parliament.” In James Wilson, The Works of James Wilson. Edited by Robert McCloskey, vol. 2, p. 726. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1967.
  • Wroth, L. Kinvin. “Symposium—Law and Civil Society: Part II: Traditional Forms of Sub-Federal Institutions: Article: Notes for a Comparative Study of the Origins of Federalism in the United States and Canada.” Arizona Journal of International and Comparative Law 15 (1998): 93.
  • Miller v. U.S., 357 U.S. 301 (1958) (Clark, J., dissenting).
  • Schneider v. Rusk, 377 U.S. 163 (1964) (Clark, J., dissenting).
  • U.S. v. Wong Kim Ark., 169 U.S. 649 (1898).
  • Archbishop of Canterbury’s Case (2 Reports 46a), p. 49
  • Foy, H. Miles. “Some Reflections on Legislation, Adjudication, and Implied Private Actions in the State and Federal Courts.” Cornell Law Review 71 (1986): 501.
  • Chudleigh’s Case (1 Reports 113b).
  • Reid, Charles J., Jr. “The Seventeenth-Century Revolution in the English Land Law.” Cleveland State Law Review 43 (1995): 221.
  • Cutler v. Dixon (4 Reports 14b), p. 111
  • Hayden, Paul T. “Reconsidering the Litigator’s Absolute Privilege to Defame.” Ohio State Law Journal 54 (1993): 985.
  • Schnapper, Eric. “‘Libelous’ Petitions for Redress of Grievances—Bad Historiography Makes Worse Law.” Iowa Law Review 74 (1989): 74.
  • Pierson v. Ray, 386 U.S. 547 (1967).
  • Murphy v. AA. Matthews, a Div. of CRS Group Engineers, Inc., 841 S.W. 2d 671 (Mo. 1992).
  • Bruce v. Byrne-Stevens & Associates Engineers, Inc., 776 P. 2d 666 (Wash. 1989).
  • Floyd and Baker (12 Reports 23), p. 427
  • State Attorney v. Parrotino, 628 So. 2d 1097 (Fla. 1993).
  • Fuller’s Case (12 Reports 41), p. 454
  • Herman, Lawrence. “The Unexplored Relationship Between the Privilege Against Compulsory Self-Incrimination and the Involuntary Confession Rule (Part I).” Ohio State Law Journal 53 (1992): 101.
  • O’Reilly, Gregory W. “England Limits the Right to Silence and Moves Towards an Inquisitorial System of Justice.” Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology 85 (1994): 402.
  • Randall, Charles H. “Sir Edward Coke and the Privilege Against Self-Incrimination.” South Carolina Law Quarterly 8 (1955): 417.
  • Usher, Roland G. “Nicholas Fuller: A Forgotten Exponent of English Liberty.” The American Historical Review 12 (1907): 743.
  • Heydon’s Case (3 Reports 7a), p. 78
  • Larue, L. H. “Special Issue on Legislation: Statutory and Constitutional Interpretation: Statutory Interpretation: Lord Coke Revisited.” University of Pittsburgh Law Review 48 (1987): 733.
  • Sinclair, M. B. W. “Statutory Reasoning.” Drake Law Review 46 (1997): 299.
  • Strauss, Peter L. “The Courts and the Congress: Should Judges Disdain Political History?” Columbia Law Review 98 (1998): 242.
  • Thorne, S. E. “The Equity of a Statute and Heydon’s Case.” University of Illinois Law Review 31 (1936): 202.
  • Board of Sup’rs of King and Queen County v. King Land Corp., 380 S.E. 2d 895 (Va. 1989).
  • Conley v. Sousa, 554 S.W. 2d 87 (Ky. 1977).
  • Northern X-Ray Co., Inc. v. State By and Through Hanson, 542 N.W. 2d 733 (N.D. 1996).
  • Pierson v. Ray, 386 U.S. 547 (1967) (Douglas, J., dissenting).
  • Stattner v. City of Caldwell, 727 P. 2d 1142 (Idaho 1986).
  • Truesdale v. South Carolina Highway Dept., 213 S.E. 2d 740 (S.C. 1975).
  • Case of the Isle of Ely (10 Reports 141a), p. 378
  • Bosselman, Fred P. “Limitations Inherent in the Title to Wetlands at Common Law.” Stanford Environmental Law Journal 15 (1996): 247.
  • Case De Libellis Famosa (5 Reports 125), p. 145
  • Mayton, William T. “Seditious Libel and the Lost Guarantee of a Freedom of Expression.” Columbia Law Review 84 (1984): 91.
  • Post, Robert C. “Symposium: New Perspectives in the Law of Defamation: The Social Foundations of Defamation Law: Reputation and the Constitution.” California Law Review 74 (1986): 691.
  • Lutrell’s Case (4 Reports 86a).
  • Bernards v. Link, 248 P. 2d 341 (Or. 1952).
  • MacKalley’s Case (9 Reports 61b), p. 314
  • Ker v. State of California, 374 U.S. 23 (1963) (Brennan, J., dissenting).
  • Marshalsea (10 Reports 68b), p. 314
  • Noto, Thomas J. “Pulliam v. Allen: Delineating the Immunity of Judges from Prospective Relief.” Catholic University Law Review 34 (1985): 829.
  • Wladis, John D. “Common Law and Uncommon Events: The Development of the Doctrine of Impossibility of Performance in English Contract Law.” Georgetown Law Journal 75 (1987): 1575.
  • Burnham v. Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 495 U.S. 604 (1990).
  • Pulliam v. Allen, 466 U.S. 522 (1984) (Powell, J., dissenting).
  • Office of State Attorney, Fourth Judicial Circuit of Florida v. Parrotino, 628 So. 2d 1097 (Fla. 1993).
  • Case of the Monopolies (11 Reports 84b), p. 394
  • Corré, Jacob I. “The Argument, Decision, and Reports of Darcy v. Allen.” Emory Law Journal 45 (1996): 1261.
  • Davies, D. Seaborne. “Further Light on the Case of Monopolies.” Law Quarterly Review 48 (1932): 394.
  • Miller, Sidney T. “The Case of the Monopolies—Some of Its Results and Suggestions.” Michigan Law Review 6 (1907): 1.
  • Sears, Roebuck & Co. v. Stiffel Co., 376 U.S. 225 (1964).
  • U.S. v. Line Material Co., 333 U.S. 287 (1948).
  • Pinnel’s Case (5 Reports 117), p. 144
  • Teeven, Kevin M. “Development of Reform of the Preexisting Duty Rule and Its Persistent Survival.” Alabama Law Review 47 (1996): 387.
  • Premunire (12 Reports 37), p. 447
  • Raack, David W. “A History of Injunctions in England Before 1700.” Indiana Law Journal 61 (1986): 539.
  • Thorne, Samuel E. “Praemunire and Sir Edward Coke.” Huntington Library Quarterly 462 (1938): 85.
  • The King’s Prerogative in Saltpetre (12 Reports 12).
  • Novak, William J. “Common Regulation: Legal Origins of State Power in America.” Hastings Law Journal 45 (1994): 1061.
  • Proclamations (12 Reports 74), p. 486
  • Cope, Esther. “Sir Edward Coke and the Proclamations.” American Journal of Legal History 15 (1971): 215.
  • McConnell, Michael W. “Tradition and Constitutionalism Before the Constitution.” University of Illinois Law Review (1998): 173.
  • Sir Stephen Proctor’s Case (12 Reports 118), p. 494
  • Barnes, Thomas G. “A Cheshire Seductress, Precedent, and a ‘Sore Blow’ to Star Chamber.” In On the Laws and Customs of England: Essays in Honor of Samuel E. Thorne, edited by Morris S. Arnold, et al. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1981.
  • Prohibitions del Roy (12 Reports 63), p. 478
  • State ex. rel. Village of Los Ranchos de Albuquerque v. City of Albuquerque, 889 P. 2d 185 (N.M. 1994).
  • Cincinnati & M.V.R. Co. v. Village of Roseville, 81 N.E. 178 (Ohio 1907).
  • Rooke’s Case (5 Reports 99), p. 141
  • Wade, Sir William. Administrative Law. 6th ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1988.
  • Lonner v. Ricks, 212 S.W. 2d 552 (Ark. 1948).
  • Countess of Rutland’s Case (5 Reports 25b).
  • Powell, H. Jefferson. “The Original Understanding of Original Intent.” Harvard Law Review 98 (1985): 885.
  • Semayne’s Case (5 Reports 91), p. 135
  • Cuddihy, William J. “The Fourth Amendment: Origins and Original Meaning, 602- 1791.” Ph.D. diss. Claremont Graduate School, 1957.
  • Cuddihy, William, and B. Carmon Hardy. “A Man’s House Was Not His Castle: Origins of the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution.” William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd. Ser., 37 (1980): 371.
  • Davies, Thomas Y. “Recovering the Original Fourth Amendment.” Michigan Law Review 98 (1999): 547.
  • Goddard, Jennifer M. “Note: The Destruction of Evidence Exception to the Knock and Announce Rule: A Call for Protection of Fourth Amendment Rights.” Boston University Law Review 75 (1995): 449.
  • Sklansky, David A. “The Fourth Amendment and Common Law.” Columbia Law Review 100 (2000): 1739
  • Witten, Todd. “Note: Wilson v. Arkansas: Thirty Years After the Supreme Court Addresses the Knock and Announce Issue.” Akron Law Review 29 (1996): 447.
  • Com. v. Carlton, 701 A. 2d 148 (Pa. 1997).
  • Green v. U.S., 355 U.S. 184 (1957) (Scalia, J., concurring).
  • Johnson v. Com., 189 S.E. 2d 678 (Va. 1972).
  • Lee v. State, 489 So. 2d 1382 (Miss. 1986).
  • Miller v. U.S., 357 U.S. 301 (1958).
  • Payton v. New York, 445 U.S. 573 (1980).
  • State v. Attaway, 870 P. 2d 103 (N.M. 1994).
  • State v. Dixon, 924 P. 2d 181 (Haw. 1996).
  • State v. Ford, 801 P. 2d 754 (Or. 1990).
  • State v. Thompson, 571 A. 2d 266 (N.H. 1990).
  • Steagald v. U.S., 451 U.S. 204 (1981).
  • Wilson v. Arkansas, 514 U.S. 927 (1995).
  • Shelley’s Case (1 Reports 88b), p. 6
  • Orth, John V. “Observation: Requiem for the Rule in Shelley’s Case.” North Carolina Law Review 67 (1989): 681.
  • Reppy, William A. “Judicial Overkill in Applying the Rule in Shelley’s Case.” Notre Dame Law Review 73 (1997): 83.
  • Simpson, A. W. B. “Politics and Law in Elizabethan England, Shelley’s Case (1581).” In Leading Cases in the Common Law. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995.
  • Countess of Shrewsbury’s Case (12 Reports 94).
  • Dutton v. Evans, 400 U.S. 74 (1970).
  • Blair v. United States, 250 U.S. 273, 279 (1919).
  • Moss Point Lumber Co. v. Board of Sup’rs of Harrison County, 42 So. 290 (Miss. 1906).
  • Slade’s Case (4 Reports 91a), p. 116
  • Baker, J. H. “New Light on Slade’s Case.” Cambridge Law Journal 29 (1971): 51.
  • Lucke, H. K. “Slade’s Case and the Origin of the Common Counts.” Parts 1–3. Law Quarterly Review 81, 82 (1965–1966): 422, 539, 81.
  • Ricks, Val D. “In Defense of Mutuality of Obligation: Why ‘Both Should Be Bound, or Neither.’” Nebraska Law Review 78 (1999):491.
  • Simpson, A. W. B. A History of the Common Law of Contract: The Rise of the Action of Assumpsit. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1975.
  • ———. “The Place of Slade’s Case in the History of Contract.” Law Quarterly Review 74 (1958): 381.
  • Holt v. Feigenbaum, 419 N.E. 2d 332 (N.Y. 1981).
  • Town of Westport v. Bossert Corp., 335 A. 2d 297 (Conn. 1973).
  • In re Traub’s Estate, 92 N.W. 2d 480 (Mich. 1958).
  • Spencer’s Case (5 Reports 16).
  • French, Susan F. “Toward a Modern Law of Servitudes: Reweaving the Ancient Strands.” Southern California Law Review 55 (1982): 55.
  • Reichman, Uriel. “Symposium Issue: Article: Toward a Unified Concept of Servitudes.” Southern California Law Review 55 (1982): 1179.
  • Sutton’s Hospital (10 Reports 1), p. 347
  • Yeazell, Stephen C. Digging for the Missing Link: From Medieval Group Litigation to the Modern Class Action. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1987.
  • Sierra Club v. Morton, 405 U.S. 727 (1972) (Douglas, J., dissenting).
  • Case of Swans (7 Reports 15), p. 232
  • Wise, Steven M. “The Legal Thinghood of Nonhuman Animals.” Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review 23 (1996): 471.
  • Twyne’s Case (3 Reports 80b).
  • Clark, Robert. “The Duties of the Corporate Debtor to Its Creditors.” Harvard Law Review 90 (1977): 505.
  • Vaux’s Case (4 Reports 44a), p. 112
  • U.S. v. Scott, 437 U.S. 82 (1978).
  • Green v. U.S., 355 U.S. 184 (1957) (Frankfurter, J., dissenting).
  • Vynior’s Case (4 Reports 81).
  • von Mehren, Robert. “From Vynior’s Case to Mitsubushi: The Future of Arbitration and Public Law.” Brooklyn International Law Journal (1986): 585.

3. Particular Trials

  • Sir Walter Raleigh’s Case.
  • Coote, Stephen. A Play of Passion: The Life of Sir Walter Raleigh. London: Macmillan, 1993.
  • Graham, Kenneth W. “The Right of Confrontation and the Hearsay Rule: Sir Walter Raleigh Loses Another One.” Criminal Law Bulletin 8 (1972): 99.
  • Raleigh, Sir Walter, The Works of Sir Walter Raleigh, Kt., Now First Collected: To Which Are Prefixed the Lives of the Author. Edited by William Oldys and Thomas Birch. 8 vols. Oxford: The University Press, 1829.
  • State v. Lanam, 459 N.W. 2d 656 (Minn. 1990) (Kelley, J., dissenting).
  • State v. Smith, 323 S.E. 2d 316 (N.C. 1984) (Martin, J., dissenting).
  • State v. Faafiti, 513 P. 2d 697 (Haw. 1973).
  • State v. Bailey, 110 S.E. 2d 165 (N.C. 1961).
  • Essex’s Case.
  • Hammer, Paul E. J. The Polarisation of Elizabethan Politics: The Political Career of Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, 1585–1597. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.
  • Strachey, Lytton. Elizabeth and Essex: A Tragic History. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1996.
  • The Gunpowder Plot.
  • Caraman, Philip. Henry Garnet, 1555–1606 and the Gunpowder Plot. New York: Farrar, Strauss, & Giroux, 1964.
  • Fraser, Antonia. Faith and Treason: The Story of the Gunpowder Plot. New York: Doubleday, 1996.
  • Nicholls, Mark. Investigating the Gunpowder Plot. New York: University of Manchester Press, 1991 (distributed by St. Martin’s Press).
  • Ross, Williamson H. The Gunpowder Plot. London: Faber and Faber, 1951.
  • Somerset’s Case (Overbury murders).
  • Amos, Andrew. Great Oyer of Poisoning: The Trial of the Earlof SomersetforthePoisoning of Sir Thomas Overbury, in the Tower of London, and Various Matters Connected Therewith, etc. London: R. Bentley, 1846.
  • McElwee, William. The Murder of Sir Thomas Overbury. London: Faber and Faber, 1952.
  • “Truth Brought to Light by Time.” In Walter Scott, ed., A Collection of Scarce and Valuable Tracts, on the Most Interesting and Entertaining Subjects: But Chiefly Such as Relate to the History and Constitution of These Kingdoms. (Somers Tracts). 2d ed. rev., 13 vol., London: T. Cadell, W. Davies, 1809–15.
  • White, Beatrice. Cast of Ravens: The Strange Case of Sir Thomas Overbury. New York: George Braziller, Inc., 1965.
  • Articuli Cleri.
  • Clanton, Bradley S. “Standing and the English Prerogative Writs: The Original Understanding.” Brooklyn Law Review 63 (1997): 1001.
  • Peacham’s Case.
  • Patterson, D. L. Jr., “Chief Justice Jeffreys and the Law of Treason,” Political Science Quarterly 20 (1905): 493.
  • Stewart, Jay. “Servants of Monarchs and Lords: The Advisory Role of Early English Judges.” American Journal of Legal History 38 (April 1994): 117.

4. The Institutes, Generally

  • Atkinson, W. A. “The Printing of Coke’s Institutes.” Law Times 162 (1926): 435.
  • Sheppard, Steve. “Casebooks, Commentaries, and Curmudgeons: An Introductory History of Law in the Lecture Hall.” Iowa Law Review 78 (1997): 547.
  • Simpson, A. W. B. “The Rise and Fall of the Legal Treatise: Legal Principles and the Forms of Legal Literature.” University of Chicago Law Review 48 (1981): 632.

5. Particular Doctrines in The Institutes

  • Abram, Suzanne L. “Note: Problems of Contemporaneous Construction in State Constitutional Interpretation.” Brandeis Law Journal 38 (2000): 613.
  • Arnold, Richard S. “Trial by Jury: The Constitutional Right to a Jury of Twelve in Civil Trials.” Hofstra Law Review 22 (1993): 1.
  • Burkhart, Ann M. “Freeing Mortgages of Merger.” Vanderbilt Law Review 40 (1987): 283.
  • Bush, Jonathan A. “‘You’re Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone’: Early Modern Common Law Discourse and the Case of the Jews.” Wisconsin Law Review (1993): 1225.
  • Christie, George C. “The Uneasy Place of Principle in Tort Law.” SMU Law Review 49 (1996): 525.
  • Dripps, Donald A. “The Constitutional Status of the Reasonable Doubt Rule.” California Law Review 75 (1987): 1665.
  • Fisher, George. “The Jury’s Rise as Lie Detector.” Yale Law Journal 107 (1997): 575.
  • Gardner, Martin R. “The Mens Rea Enigma: Observations on the Role of Motive in the Criminal Law Past and Present.” Utah Law Review (1993): 635.
  • Hafetz, Jonathan L. “Note: The Untold Story of Noncriminal Habeas Corpus and the 1996 Immigration Acts.” Yale Law Journal 107 (1998): 2509.
  • Harrison, Jack B. “How Open Is Open? The Development of the Public Access Doctrine Under State Open Court Provisions.” University of Cincinnati Law Review 60 (1992): 1307.
  • Lindgren, James. “Blackmail: Morals: The Theory, History, and Practice of the Bribery-Extortion Distinction.” University of Pennsylvania Law Review 141 (1993): 1695.
  • ———. “The Elusive Distinction Between Bribery and Extortion: From the Common Law to the Hobbs Act.” UCLA Law Review 35 (1988): 815.
  • Oldham, James C. “The Origins of the Special Jury.” University of Chicago Law Review 50 (1983): 137.
  • Orth, John V. “Taking from A and Giving to B: Substantive Due Process and the Case of the Shifting Paradigm.” Constitutional Commentary 14 (1997): 337.
  • Stephen, Sir James Fitzjames. A History of the Criminal Law of England. 3vols.London: MacMillan & Co., 1883.
  • Tomkovicz, James J. “The Endurance of the Felony-Murder Rule: A Study of the Forces That Shape Our Criminal Law.” Washington & Lee Law Review 51 (1994): 1429.
  • Wang, Janice Sue. “Comment: State Constitutional Remedy Provisions and Article I, Section 10 of the Washington State Constitution: The Possibility of Greater Judicial Protection of Established Tort Causes of Action and Remedies.” Washington Law Review 64 (1989): 203.

I. Coke’s Service in Parliament

  • Christianson, Paul. “Political Thought in Early Stuart England.” Historical Journal 30 (1987): 960.
  • Cust, Richard. “Charles I, the Privy Council, and the Forced Loan.” Journal of British Studies 24 (1985): 208.
  • ———. The Forced Loan and English Politics, 1626–1628. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1987.
  • Flemion, J. S. “The Struggle for the Petition of Right in the House of Lords: The Study of an Opposition Victory.” Journal of Modern History 45 (1973): 193.
  • Foster, Elizabeth Read. “The Procedure of the House of Commons Against Patents and Monopolies, 1621–1624.” In Conflict in Stuart England: Essays in Honor of Wallace Notestein, edited by A. W. Aiken and B. D. Henning. New York: Archon Books, 1960.
  • ———, ed. Proceedings in Parliament 1610. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1966.
  • Hexter, J. H. “Power Struggle, Parliament, and Liberty in Early Stuart England.” Journal of Modern History 50 (1978): 1.
  • Hinton, R. W. K. “The Decline of Parliamentary Government under Elizabeth I and the Early Stuarts.” Cambridge Historical Journal 13 (1957): 116.
  • Hirst, Derek. “Elections and the Privileges of the House of Commons in the Early Seventeenth Century: Confrontation or Compromise?” Historical Journal 18 (1975): 851.
  • ———. The Representative of the People?: Voters and Voting in England Under the Early Stuarts. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1975.
  • Hulme, Harold. “The Winning of Freedom of Speech by the House of Commons.” The American Historical Review 61 (1956): 825.
  • Jansson, Maija, and William B. Bidwell. Proceedings in Parliament 1625. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1987.
  • Johnson, Robert C., Mary Frear Keeler, Maija Jansson Cole, and William B. Bidwell, eds. Commons Debates 1628. Yale Center for Parliamentary History. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1977.
  • Judson, Margaret Atwood. The Crisis of the Constitution: An Essay in Constitutional and Political Thought in England, 1603–1645. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1949.
  • Lake, Peter. “Anti-Popery: The Structure of a Prejudice.” In Conflict in Early Stuart England: Studies in Religion and Politics, 1603–1642, edited by Richard Cust and Ann Hughes. London: Longman, 1989.
  • Merz, Ruth. “Sir Edward Coke in the Parliament of 1621.” Master’s thesis,Washington University, 1942.
  • Mitchell, Williams M. The Rise of the Revolutionary Party in the English House of Commons, 1603–1629. New York: Columbia University Press, 1957.
  • Notestein, Wallace, Frances Helen Relf, and Hartley Simpson. Commons Debates, 1621. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1935.
  • Pocock, J. G. A. “The Commons Debates of 1628.” Journal of the History of Ideas 39 (1978): 329.
  • Ruigh, Robert E. The Parliament of 1624: Politics and Foreign Policy. Harvard Historical Studies, vol. 87. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1971.
  • Russell, Conrad. Parliaments and English Politics, 1621–1629. Oxford: ClarendonPress, 1979.
  • ———. “Parliamentary History in Perspective, 1604–1629.” In Unrevolutionary England, 1603–1642. London: Hambledon Press, 1990.
  • White, Steven D. Sir Edward Coke and “The Grievances of the Commonwealth,” 1621- 1628. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1979.
  • Willson, David Harris. The Privy Councillors in the House of Commons, 1604–1629. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1940.
  • Zaller, Robert. The Parliament of 1621: A Study in Constitutional Conflict. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1971.

J. Coke’s Views on Parliament and Statutes

  • Baade, Hans W. “The Casus Omissus: A Pre-History of Statutory Analogy.” Syracuse Journal of International Law and Commerce 20 (1994): 45.
  • McIlwain, Charles H. The High Court of Parliament and Its Supremacy. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1910.
  • McKay, R. A. “Coke—Parliamentary Supremacy or the Supremacy of the Law?” Michigan Law Review 22 (1924): 215.

K. Impeachments

  • Cecil, Henry. Tipping the Scales. London: Hutchinson, 1964.
  • Hurstfield, Joel. Freedom, Corruption and Government in Elizabethan England. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1973.
  • Marcus, Richard L. “English Common Law: Studies in the Sources: The Tudor Treason Trials: Some Observations on the Emergence of Forensic Themes.” University of Illinois Law Review (1984): 675.
  • Noonan, John T. Bribes: The Intellectual History of a Moral Idea. New York: Macmillan, 1984.
  • Powell, Damian X. “Why Was Sir Francis Bacon Impeached? The Common Lawyers and the Chancery Revisited: 1621.” History 81 (1996): 511.
  • Roberts, Clayton. The Growth of Responsible Government in Stuart England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1966.
  • Smith, Lacey Baldwin. Treason in Tudor England: Politics and Paranoia. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1986.
  • Snapp, Harry F. “The Impeachment of Roger Maynwaring.” Huntington Library Quarterly 30 (1966–67): 217.
  • Tite, Colin G. C. Impeachment and Parliamentary Judicature in Early Stuart England. London: Athlone Press, 1974.

L. Magna Carta

  • Ashley, Maurice. Magna Carta in the Seventeenth Century. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1965.
  • Blackstone, William. The Great Charter and Charter of the Forest, with Other Authentic Instruments, to Which Is Affixed an Introductory Discourse Containing the History of the Charters. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1759. Reprinted in—.Tracts, Chiefly Relating to the Antiquities and Laws of England. 3d ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1781.
  • Butterfield, Sir Herbert. The Englishman and His History. Cambridge: The University Press, 1944.
  • ———. Magna Carta in the Historiography of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. Reading: University of Reading, 1969.
  • ———. The Whig Interpretation of History. New York: W. W. Norton, 1965.
  • Ely, James W., Jr. “The Oxymoron Reconsidered: Myth and Reality in the Origins of Substantive Due Process.” Constitutional Commentary 16 (1999): 315.
  • Goodhart, Arthur L. Law of the Land. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1966.
  • Hazeltine, H. D. “The Influence of Magna Carta on American Constitutional Development.” In Magna Carta Commemoration Essays, edited by Henry Elliot Malden. London: Royal Historical Society, 1917.
  • Helmholz, R. H. “Magna Carta and the ius commune.” University of Chicago Law Review 66 (1999): 297.
  • Holt, J. C. Magna Carta. 2d ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.
  • Howard, A. E. Dick. The Road from Runnymede: Magna Carta and Constitutionalism in America. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1968.
  • Jennings, Sir Ivor. Magna Carta and Its Influence in the World Today. London: Central Office of Information, 1965.
  • Johnson, Samuel. A History and Defence of Magna Charta: Containing a Copy of the Original Charter at Large, with an English Translation; the Manner of Its Being Obtained from King John, with Its Preservation and Final Establishment in the Succeeding Reigns. With an Introductory Discourse, Containing a Short Account of the Rise and Progress of National Freedom, from the Invasion of Caesar to the Present Times. London: J. Bell, 1769.
  • McKencie, W. S. Magna Carta. Glasgow: Malehose & Sons, 1914.
  • Pallister, Anne. Magna Carta: The Heritage of Liberty. New York: Oxford University Press, 1971.
  • Radin, Max. “The Myth of Magna Carta.” Harvard Law Review 60 (1947): 1060.
  • Sandoz, Ellis, ed. The Roots of Liberty: Magna Carta, the Ancient Constitution, and the Anglo-American Tradition of Rule of Law. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1993. (Including essays by Ellis Sandoz, J. C.
  • Holt, Christopher W.
  • Brooks, Paul Christianson, John Phillip Reid, and Corrine Comstock Weston.)
  • Swindler, William F. Magna Carta. New York: Grosset and Dunlap, 1968.
  • Thompson, Faith. Magna Carta: Its Role in the Making of the English Constitution, 1300–1629. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1948.
  • Thorne, Samuel, William H. Dunham, Philip B. Kurland, and Sir Ivor Jennings. The Great Charter: Four Essays on Magna Carta and the History of Our Liberty. New York: Pantheon, 1965.

M. The Petition of Right

  • Boynton, Lindsay. “Martial Law and the Petition of Right.” English Historical Review 74 (1959): 23.
  • Creasy, Sir Edward Shepherd. The Textbook of the Constitution: Magna Charta, the Petition of Right, and the Bill of Rights. London: Richard Bentley, 1848.
  • Forster, John. Sir John Eliot: A Biography 1590–1632. London: Longman, Roberts, & Green, 1864.
  • Foster, Elizabeth Read. “Printing the Petition of Right.” Huntington Library Quarterly 28 (1974): 81.
  • Guy, J. A. “The Origins of the Petition of Right Reconsidered.” Historical Journal 25 (1982): 289.
  • Mosse, George Lachmann. The Struggle for Sovereignty in England, from the Reign of Queen Elizabeth to the Petition of Right. East Lansing: Michigan State College Press, 1950.
  • Popofsky, Linda. “Habeas Corpus and ‘Liberty of the Subject’: Legal Arguments for the Petition of Right in the Parliament of 1628.” The Historian 41 (1979): 257.
  • Reeve, L. J. “The Legal Status of the Petition of Right.” Historical Journal 29 (1986): 257.
  • Relf, Frances Helen. “The Petition of Right: Bibliographical Notes for the Parliament of 1628.” Ph.D. diss., University of Minnesota, 1917.
  • Schnapper, Eric. “The Parliament of Wonders (Review essay of Johnson, Kealer, Cole, and Bidwell, eds., Commons Debates 1628 ).” Columbia Law Review 84 (1984): 1665.
  • Thompson, Christopher. “The Origins of the Politics of the Parliamentary Middle Group, 1625–1629.” Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 5th ser., 22 (1972).
  • Young, Michael B. “The Origins of the Petition of Right Reconsidered Further.” Historical Journal 27 (1984): 449.

N. Economics

  • Anderson, Gary M., and Robert D. Tollison. “Barristers and Barriers: Sir Edward Coke and the Regulation of Trade.” Cato Journal 13 (1993): 49.
  • McCormack, Wayne. “Economic Substantive Due Process and the Right of Livelihood.” Kentucky Law Journal 82 (1994): 397.
  • MacPherson, C. B. The Political Theory of Possessive Individualism: Hobbes to Locke. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1962.
  • Malamet, Barbara. “The ‘Economic Liberalism’ of Sir Edward Coke.” Yale Law Journal 76 (1967): 1321.
  • Reid, Charles J. “The Seventeenth-Century Revolution in the English Land Law.” Cleveland State Law Review 43 (1995): 221.
  • Siegan, Bernard H. “Propter Honoris Respectum: Separation of Powers & Economic Liberties.” Notre Dame Law Review 70 (1995): 415.
  • Wagner, Donald O. “Coke and the Rise of Economic Liberalism.” Economic History Review 6 (1935): 30.
  • ———. “The Common Law and Free Enterprise: An Early Case of Monopoly.” Economic History Review 7, no. 1 (1937): 217.

O. Liberty

  • Carlyle, Alexander James. Political Liberty. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1941.
  • Hayek, Friedrich. The Constitution of Liberty. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1978.
  • Hinton, R. W. K. “Government and Liberty under James I.” Cambridge Historical Journal 11 (1955): 48.
  • Palmer, Ben W. “Edward Coke: Champion of Liberty.” American Bar Association Journal 32 (1946): 135.

P. Legacy in England

  • Berman, Harold J., and Charles J. Reid. “The Transformation of English Legal Science: From Hale to Blackstone.” Emory Law Journal 45 (1996): 437.
  • Care, Henry. English Liberties: Or, The Free-born Subject’s Inheritance. London: G. Larkin, 1680(?).
  • Coquillette, Daniel R. “Ideology and Incorporation III: Reason Regulated—The Post-Restoration English Civilians, 1653–1735.” Boston University Law Review 67 (1987): 289.
  • Gough, J. W. “Sir Edward Coke.” In Fundamental Law in English History. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1955.
  • Hale, Sir Matthew. The History and Analysis of the Common Law of England: Written by a Learned Hand. London: J. Nutt, 1713.
  • Haller, William. Liberty and Reformation in the Puritan Revolution. New York: Columbia University Press, 1955.
  • Hanson, Donald W. From Kingdom to Commonwealth: The Development of Civic Consciousness in English Political Thought. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1970.
  • Jones, William J. Politics and the Bench: The Judges and the Origins of the English Civil War. London: Allen and Unwin, 1971.
  • Keeton, George W. Shakespeare’s Legal and Political Background. New York: Barnes & Noble, 1968. (See chapter four.)
  • Landon, Michael. The Triumph of the Lawyers: 1678–1689. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1970.
  • Levack, Brian P. “Possession, Witchcraft, and the Law in Jacobean England.” Washington and Lee Law Review 52 (1995): 1613.
  • Malcolm, Joyce Lee. “Introduction.” In The Struggle for Sovereignty: Eighteenth- Century English Political Tracts. Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1999. (See also entries throughout.)
  • Pocock, J. G. A. “Burke and the Ancient Constitution: A Problem in the History of Ideas” in Pocock, Politics, Language and Time: Essays on Political Thought and History. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989.
  • Pollard, A. F. The Evolution of Parliament. London: Longman, Green & Co., 1920.
  • Pollock, Sir Frederic. The Expansion of the Common Law. London: Stevens and Sons, 1904.
  • Stephenson, Carl, and Frederick George Marcham. Sources of English Constitutional History: A Selection of Documents froma.d.600 to the Present. New York: Harper & Row, 1937.
  • Stone, Lawrence. The Causes of the English Revolution, 1529–1642. New York: Harper & Row, 1972.
  • Taswell, Langmead, and Thomas Pitt. English Constitutional History from the Teutonic Conquest to the Present Time. 10th ed. London: Sweet & Maxwell, 1946.
  • Wood, Thomas. Institutes of the Laws of England. London: E. and R. Nutt and R. Gosling, 1720.
  • ———. “Some Thoughts Concerning the Study of the Laws of England in the Two Universities.” In Michael H.
  • Hoeflich, ed., The Gladsome Light of Jurisprudence: Learning the Law in England and the United States in the 18th and 19th Centuries. New York: Greenwood Press, 1988.

Q. Legacy in the United States

Baade, Hans W. “‘Original Intention’: Raoul Berger’s Fake Antique.” North Carolina Law Review 70 (1992): 1523.

  • Baker, Fred A. The Fundamental Law of American Constitutions. Washington, D.C.: J. Byrne & Co., 1916.

  • Berger, Raoul. “The Founders’ Views—According to Jefferson Powell.” Texas Law Review 67 (1989): 1033. (See “Powell” under the Countess of Rutland’s Case, 11.H.2, above.)

  • ———. “Perspectives on Natural Law: Natural Law and Judicial Review: Reflections of an Earthbound Lawyer.” University of Cincinnati Law Review 61 (1992): 5.

  • ———. “Response: Original Intent: The Rage of Hans Baade.” North Carolina Law Review 71 (1993): 1151.

  • Bilder, Mary Sarah, “The Lost Lawyers: Early American Legal Literates and Transatlantic Culture.” Yale Journal of Law and the Humanities 11 (1999): 47.

  • ———. “The Origin of the Appeal in America.” Hastings Law Journal 48 (1997): 913.

  • Billings, Warren M. “Justices, Books, Laws, and Courts in Seventeenth-Century Virginia.” Law Library Journal 85 (1993): 277.

  • Black, Barbara Aronstein. “The Constitution of the Empire: The Case for the Colonists.” University of Pennsylvania Law Review 124 (1975–76): 1157.

  • ———. “A Bicentennial Celebration of the Constitution: The Third Circuit Judicial Conference in Philadelphia: Retrospective View. An Astonishing Political Innovation: The Origins of Judicial Review.” University of Pittsburgh Law Review 49 (1988): 691.

  • Clark, J. C. D. The Language of Liberty 1660–1732: Political Discourse and Social Dynamics in the Anglo-American World. Cambridge: Cambridge UniversityPress,1994.

  • Colburn, Trevor. The Lamp of Experience: Whig History and the Intellectual Origins of the American Revolution. Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1998.

  • Coquillette, Daniel R. “First Flower—The Earliest American Law Reports and the Extraordinary Josiah Quincy Jr. (1744–1775).” Suffolk University Law Review 30 (1996): 1.

  • ———. “Legal Ideology and Incorporation IV: The Nature of Civilian Influence on Modern Anglo-American Commercial Law.” Boston University Law Review 67 (1987): 877.

  • Corwin, Edward S. The Doctrine of Judicial Review: Its Legal and Historical Basis and Other Essays. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1914.

  • ———. “The Establishment of Judicial Review, I.” Michigan Law Review 11 (1910): 102.

  • ———. “The Establishment of Judicial Review, II.” Michigan Law Review 9 (1911): 283.

  • ———. “The ‘Higher Law’ Background of American Constitutional Law.” Parts 1, 2. Harvard Law Review 42 (1928): 149, 365.

  • ———. The “Higher Law” Background of American Constitutional Law. Ithaca, N.Y.: Great Seal Books, 1955.

  • ———. Liberty Against Government: The Rise, Flowering and Decline of a Famous Juridical Concept. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1948.

  • Curtis, Michael Kent. “Historical Linguistics, Inkblots, and Life after Death: The Privileges or Immunities of Citizens of the United States.” North Carolina Law Review 78 (2000): 1071.

  • Dalzell, George W. Benefit of Clergy in America and Related Matters. Winston-Salem, N. C.: John F. Blair, 1955.

  • Ely, James W. Jr. “Comment: Comments on Clinton: Reconsidering the Role of Natural Law in John Marshall’s Jurisprudence.” John Marshall Law Review 33 (2000): 1141.

  • Flint, George Lee, Jr. “Secured Transactions History: The Fraudulent Myth.” New Mexico Law Review 29 (1999): 363.

  • Geller, Lawrence D., and Peter J. Gomes. The Books of the Pilgrims. New York:Garland Publishing, 1975.

  • Greene, Jack P. Peripheries and Center: Constitutional Development in the Extended Polities of the British Empire and the United States 1607–1788. New York: W. W. Norton, 1986.

  • Grey, Thomas C. “Origins of the Unwritten Constitution: Fundamental Law and American Revolutionary Thought.” Stanford Law Review 30 (1978): 843.

  • Haines, Charles G. The Revival of Natural Law Concepts: A Study of the Establishment and of the Interpretation of Limits on Legislatures with Special Reference to the Development of Certain Phases of American Constitutional Law. Harvard Studies in Jurisprudence, vol. 4. New York: Russell & Russell, 1965.

  • Haskins, George Lee. Law and Authority in Early Massachusetts; A Study in Tradition and Design. New York, Macmillian, 1960.

  • Healy, Michael P. “Communis Opinio and the Methods of Statutory Interpretation: Interpreting Law or Changing Law.” William and Mary Law Review 43 (2001) 539.

  • Hill, Alfred. “The Political Dimension of Constitutional Adjudication.” Southern California Law Review 63 (1990): 1237.

  • Koch, William C. “Reopening Tennessee’s Open Courts Clause: A Historical Reconsideration of Article I, Section 17 of the Tennessee Constitution.” Memphis State University Law Review 27 (1997): 333.

  • Kurland, Philip B. “Magna Carta and Constitutionalism in the United States: The Myth and the Noble Lie.” In The Great Charter: Four Essays on Magna Carta and the History of Our Liberty, edited by Samuel Thorne, William H. Dunham, Philip B. Kurland, and Sir Ivor Jennings. New York: Pantheon, 1965.

  • Lawson, Gary, and Guy Seidman. “Downsizing the Right to Petition.” Northwestern University Law Review 93 (1999): 739.

  • Lovejoy, David. The Glorious Revolution in America. New York: Harper Torchbooks, 1974.

  • McCarthy, Finbarr. “Participatory Government and Communal Property: Two Radicbibll Concepts in the Virginia Charter of 1606.” University of Richmond Law Review 29 (1995): 327

  • McConnell, Michael W. “Tradition and Constitutionalism Before the Constitution.” University of Illinois Law Review (1998): 173.

  • McDowell, Gary L. “Coke, Corwin, and the Constitution: The ‘Higher Law Background’ Reconsidered.” The Review of Politics 55 (1993): 393.

  • McIlwain, Charles H. The American Revolution. New York: Macmillan Co., 1923.

  • McManus, Edgar J. Law and Liberty in Early New England: Criminal Justice and Due Process, 1620–1692. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1993.

  • Mandell, Joshua R. “Comment: Trees That Fall in the Forest: the Precedential Effect of Unpublished Opinions.” Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review 34 (2000): 1255.

  • Manning, John F. “Textualism and the Equity of the Statute.” Columbia Law Review 101 (2001): 1.

  • Massey, Calvin R. “Symposium: Perspective on Natural Law: The Natural Law Component of The Ninth Amendment,” University of Cincinnati Law Review 61 (1992): 49.

  • Morris, Richard B. “Massachusetts and the Common Law.” American Historical Review 31 (1926): 443.

  • Mullett, Charles F. “Coke and the American Revolution.” Economica 12 (1932): 457.

  • ———. Fundamental Law and the American Revolution, 1760–1776. New York: Columbia University Press, 1933.

  • ———. “The Eighteenth-Century Background of John Marshall’s Constitutional Jurisprudence.” Michigan Law Review 76 (1978): 893.

  • Notestein, Wallace. The English People on the Eve of Colonization, 1603–1630. New York: Harper, 1954.

  • Penn, William. English Liberties: Or, The Freeborn Subject’s Inheritance. London: G. Larkin or J. Howe, 1682. (Sometimes attributed to Henry Care.)

  • ———. The Excellent Priviledge of Liberty & Property Being the Birth-Right of the Free- Born Subjects of England. Philadelphia: William Bradford, 1687.

  • Pope, Herbert. “The Fundamental Law and the Power of the Courts.” Harvard Law Review 27 (1913): 45.

  • Pound, Roscoe. “Common Law and Legislation.” Harvard Law Review 21 (1907): 386.

  • ———. The Formative Era of American Law. Boston: Little, Brown, 1938.

  • Reid, John Philip. The Briefs of the American Revolution: Constitutional Arguments Between Thomas Hutchinson, Governor of Massachusetts Bay, and James Bowdoin for the Council and John Adams for the House of Representatives. New York: New York University Press, 1981.

  • ———. The Concept of Liberty in the Age of the American Revolution. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1988.

  • ———. Constitutional History of the American Revolution. 4 vols. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1986–1995. (1 vol. abridgment, 1995.)

  • Reinsch, Paul S. “The English Common Law in the Early American Colonies.” In Select Essays in Anglo-American Legal History, edited by American Association of Law Schools. Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1907.

  • Riggs, Robert E. “Substantive Due Process in 1791.” Wisconsin Law Review (1990): 941.

  • Roesler, Shannon M. “Comment: The Kansas Remedy by Due Course of Law Provision: Defining a Right to a Remedy.” Kansas Law Review 47 (1999): 655.

  • Rossiter, Clinton. Seedtime of the Republic: The Origin of the American Tradition of Political Liberty. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1953.

  • Schwartz, Paul, Barbara Kern, and R. B. Bernstein. Thomas Jefferson and Bolling v. Bolling: Law and Legal Profession in Pre-Revolutionary America. San Marino, Calif.: Huntington Library, 1999.

  • Schweber, Howard. “The ‘Science’ of Legal Science: The Model of the Natural Sciences in Nineteenth-Century American Legal Education.” Law and History Review 17 (1999): 421.

  • Scott, Arthur P. “The Constitutional Aspects of the ‘Parson’s Cause.’” Political Science Quarterly 31 (1916): 558.

  • Sheppard, Steve, ed. The History of Legal Education in the United States: Commentaries and Primary Sources. Pasadena: Salem Press, 1998.

  • Sherry, Suzanna. “The Founders’ Unwritten Constitution.” University of Chicago Law Review 54 (1987): 1127.

  • ———. “Symposium: Perspective on Natural Law: Natural Law in the States.” University of Cincinnati Law Review 61 (1992): 171.

  • Stoner, James R. Common Law and Liberal Theory: Coke, Hobbes, and the Origins of American Constitutionalism. Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 1992.

  • Whitman, James Q. “Why Did the Revolutionary Lawyers Confuse Custom and Reason?” University of Chicago Law Review 58 (1991): 1321.

  • Wright, Benjamin Fletcher. American Interpretations of Natural Law: A Study in the History of Political Thought. London: Russell & Russell, 1962.

  • Zweiben, Beverly. How Blackstone Lost the Colonies: English Law, Colonial Lawyers and the American Revolution. New York: Garland Publishing, 1990.

  • Anastasoff v. U. S., 223 F. 3d 898 (8th Cir., 2000) (Arnold, C. J.).

R. Legacy Elsewhere.

  • Aja Espil, Jorge A. En Los Orígenes De La Tratadística Constitucional. Buenos Aires: Abeledo-Perrot, 1968.
  • Clark, David. “Legal History: The Icon of Liberty: The Status and Role of Magbibla Carta in Australian and New Zealand Law.” Melbourne University Law Review 24 (2000): 866.
  • Parent, Hugues. “Histoire de l’acte Volontaire En Droit Penal Anglais et Canadien.” McGill Law Journal 45 (2000): 975.

III. Selected Commentaries on Related Matters

A. Coke’s Monarchs and Their Governance

  • Trevelyan, George Macaulay. England Under the Stuarts. London: Methuen & Co., 1949.

1. Elizabeth I

  • Erickson, Carolly. The First Elizabeth. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1997.
  • Neale, Sir John Ernest. The Elizabethan House of Commons. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1950.
  • ———. Elizabeth I and Her Parliaments, 1584–1601. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1958.
  • Nichols, John. The Progresses and Public Processions of Queen Elizabeth. London: J. Nichols and Son, 1823.

2. James VI and I

  • James I. “The Trew Law of Free Monarchies (The 1598 Text).” In The Political Works of James I. 1616. Reprint. Edited by Charles H. McIlwain. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1918. And in James VI and I. Political Writings. Edited by Johann B. Sommerville. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.
  • Nichols, J. B., ed. The Progresses, Processions, and Magnificent Festivities of King James the First, His Royal Consort, Family, and Court. London: J. B. Nichols, 1828.
  • Parent, Hugues. “Histoire de l’Acte Volontaire en Droit Penal Anglais et Canadien.” McGill Law Journal 45 (2000): 975.
  • Smith, Alan G. R., ed. The Reign of James VI and I. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1973.
  • Usher, Roland G. “James I and Sir Edward Coke.” English History Review 18 (1903): 664.
  • Willson, David Harris. King James VI and I. London: Jonathan Cape, 1956.

3. Charles I

  • Reeve, L. J. Charles I and the Road to Personal Rule. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989.
  • Sharpe, Kevin. The Personal Rule of Charles I. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1993.

B. Rivals, Allies, and Sponsors

1. Sir Francis Bacon

  • Burch, Charles Nelson. “The Rivals [Coke and Bacon].” Virginia Law Review 14 (1928): 507.
  • Coquillette, Daniel R. Francis Bacon. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1992.
  • Du Maurier, Dame Daphne. The Winding Stair: Sir Francis Bacon, His Rise and Fall. London: Gollancz, 1976.
  • Jardine, Lisa, and Alan Stewart. Hostage to Fortune: The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon. New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1999.
  • Marwil, Jonathan L. The Trials of Counsel: Francis Bacon in 1621. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1976.
  • Matthews, Nieves. Francis Bacon: The History of a Character Assassination. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1999.
  • Peltonen, Makku, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Bacon. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.
  • Spedding, James. An Account of the Life of Francis Bacon, Extracted from the Edition of His Occasional Writings. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1878.
  • ———. Robert Ellis, and Douglas Heath, eds. The Works of Francis Bacon. 14 vols. London: Longman, 1857–1874.
  • Vickers, Brian, ed. Essential Articles for the Study of Francis Bacon. The Essential Article Series. Hamden, Conn.: Archon Books, 1968.
  • Zagorin, Perez. Francis Bacon. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999.

2. Thomas Egerton, Baron Ellesmere

  • Dawson, John P. “Coke and Ellesmere Disinterred: The Attack on the Chancery in 1616.” University of Illinois Law Review 36 (1936): 127.
  • Jones, W. J. “Ellesmere and Politics, 1603–1617.” In Early Stuart Studies: Essays in Honor of David Harris Willson, edited by Howard S. Reinmuth. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1970.
  • Knafla, Louis A. Law and Politics in Jacobean England: The Tracts of Lord Chancellor Ellesmere. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1977.
  • Plucknett, T. F. T. “Ellesmere on Statutes.” Law Quarterly Review 60 (1944): 242.

3. William Cecil, Lord Burghley

  • Cecil, William. The Execution of Justice in England. Edited by Robert M. Kingdon. Folger Shakespeare Library. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1965.
  • Dennis, George Ravenscroft. The Cecil Family. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1914.
  • Graves, Michael A. R. Burghley: William Cecil, Lord Burghley. New York: Longman, 1998.
  • Hickes, Sir Michael. The “Anonymous Life” of William Cecil, Lord Burghley. Edited by Alan G. R. Smith. Lewiston, N.Y.: E. Mellen Press, 1990.
  • Read, Conyers. Lord Burghley and Queen Elizabeth. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1960.

4. Robert Cecil, Earl of Salisbury

  • Cecil, Algernon. A Life of Robert Cecil, First Earl of Salisbury. London: J. Murray, 1915.
  • Handover, P. M. The Second Cecil: The Rise to Power, 1563–1604, of Sir Robert Cecil, Later First Earl of Salisbury. London: Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1959.
  • Haynes, Alan Robert. Cecil, Earl of Salisbury, 1563–1612: Servant of Two Sovereigns. London: P. Owen, 1989.

5. John Selden

  • Berkowitz, David Sandler. John Selden’s Formative Years: Politics and Society in Early Seventeenth-Century England. Washington, D.C.: Folger Shakespeare Library, 1988.
  • Christianson, Paul. Discourse on History, Law, and Governance in the Public Career of John Selden, 1610–1635. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996.
  • ———. “The Five Knights’ Case, and Discretionary Imprisonment in Early Stuart England.” Criminal Justice History 6 (1985): 65.
  • ———. “Young John Selden and the Ancient Constitution, ca. 1610–18.” Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 128 (1984): 271.
  • Selden, John. Opera Omnia, tam Edita quem Inedita. Collegit ac Recensuit Vita Auctoris, Praefationes Indices Adjecit. Edited by David Wilkins. 6 vols. London: J. Walthoe [and others], 1726.

6. Sir John Davies

  • Klemp, P. J. Fulke Greville and Sir John Davies: A Reference Guide. Boston: G. K. Hall, 1985.
  • Pawlisch, Hans S. “Sir John Davies, the Ancient Constitution, and Civil Law.” History Journal 23 (1980): 689.
  • Sanderson, James L. Sir John Davies. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1975.

7. Sir Christopher Hatton

  • Brooks, Eric St. John. Sir Christopher Hatton: Queen Elizabeth’s Favourite. London: J. Cape, 1946.
  • Vines, Alice Gilmore. Neither Fire Nor Steel: Sir Christopher Hatton. Chicago: Nelson- Hall, 1978.

8. Lady Elizabeth Hatton

  • Disraeli, Isaac. “Domestic History of Sir Edward Coke.” In Curiosities of Literature. New York: J. Widdleton, 1872. (Contains transcripts of a defense of Lady Hatton that may be the work of Francis Bacon.)
  • Norsworthy, Laura. The Lady of Bleeding Heart Yard: Lady Elizabeth Hatton, 1578- 1646. New York: Harcourt, Brace & Co., 1936.
  • Turner, Jesse. “Concerning Divers Notable Stirs Between Sir Edward Coke and His Lady.” American Law Review 51 (1917): 883.

9. Roger Williams

  • Carpenter, Edmund James. Roger Williams: A Study of the Life, Times and Character of a Political Pioneer. New York: Grafton Press, 1909. Reprint. Freeport,N.Y.:Books for Libraries Press, 1972.
  • Covey, Cyclone. The Gentle Radical: A Biography of Roger Williams. New York: Macmillan, 1966.
  • Eberle, Edward J. “Roger Williams’ Gift: Religious Freedom in America.” Roger Williams University Law Review 4 (1999): 425.
  • Felker, Christopher D. “Roger Williams’ Uses of Legal Discourse: Testing Authority in Early New England.” The New England Quarterly 63 (1990): 624.
  • Hall, Timothy D. Separating Church and State: Roger Williams and Religious Liberty. Bloomington: University of Illinois Press, 1998.
  • Miller, Perry. Roger Williams: His Contribution to the American Tradition. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1953.
  • Williams, Roger. The Correspondence of Roger Williams. Edited by Glenn W. La- Fantasie. Hanover: Brown University Press, 1988.

10. Coke’s Heirs

  • Coke, Roger. A Detection of the Court and State of England During the Four Last Reigns, and the Inter-Regnum: Consisting of Private Memoirs, &c., with Observations and Reflections: Also an Appendix Discovering the Present State of the Nation. in Two Volumes London, 1694.
  • ———. A Survey of the Politicks of Mr. Thomas White, Thomas Hobbs, and Hugo Grotius Also, Elements of Power & Subjection, Or, the Causes of Humane, Christian, and Legal Society. London: Printed for G. Bedell and T. Collins, 1662.
  • ———. A Supplement to the First Edition of the Detection of the Court and State of England During the Four Last Reigns and the Inter-regnum: Containing Many Secrets Never Before Made Publick: as Also a More Impartial Account of the Civil Wars in England than Has Yet Been Given. London: Printed for Andrew Bell, 1696.
  • ———. Justice Vindicated from the False Focus Put upon it by Thomas White, Gent., Thomas Hobbs, and Hugo Grotius. And Also Elements of Power & Subjection Wherein Is Demonstrated the Cause of All Humane, Christian and Legal Society, London: G. Bedell and T. Collins, 1660.
  • Longueville, Thomas. The Curious Case of Lady Purbeck; A Scandal of the XVIIbiblh Century. London: Longmans, Green, & Co., 1909. (The story of Coke’s daughter Frances.)
  • Stirling, A. M. W. Coke of Norfolk, and His Friends: The Life of Thomas William Coke. London: J. Lane, 1912.
  • C. Selected Early Criticism
  • Brooke, Sir Robert. The Reading of M. Robert Brook, Serjeant of the Law, and Recorder of London, upon the Stat. of Magna Charta, Chap. 16. London: M. Flesher and R. Young, 1641.
  • Egerton, Thomas (Baron Ellesmere and Viscount Brackley). The Lord Chancellor Egerton’s Observations on the Lord Coke’s Reports: Particularly in the Debate of Causes Relating to the Right of the Church; the Power of the King’s Prerogative; the Jurisdiction of Courts; Or, the Interest of the Subject. London: B. Lintott, 1710(?). Reprinted in Knafla, Law and Politics in Jacobean England, listed above in section III.B.2.
  • Fulbecke, William. A Parallele or Conference of the Civil Law, the Canon Law, and the Common Law of this Realme of England. London: Company of Stationers, 1618.
  • Hobart, Sir Henry. The Reportsof that Reverend and Learned Judge, The Right Honorable Sr. Henry Hobart Knight and Baronet, Lord Chief Justice of His Majesty’s Court of Common Pleas; and Chancellor of both Their Highnesses Henry and Charles, Princes of Wales, 1603–1625. 5th ed. Edited by Edward Chilton. London: E. and R. Nut and R. Gosling, 1724. (Chief Justice Hobart’s ruling in the 1614 case, Day v. Savage, holds, “Because even an Act of Parliament, made against natural equity, as to make a man Judge in his own case, is void in itself, for Jura natura sunt immutabilia, and they are leges legum.”)
  • Hobbes, Thomas. Dialogue Between a Philosopher and a Student of the Common Law of England. Edited by Joseph Cropsey. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1971.
  • De Vere, Edward (Earl of Oxford). “Some Notes and Observations upon the Statute of Magna Charta, Chapter 29, and Other Statutes Concerning the Proceedings in the Chancery . . . , 1615–1616.” MS. 1031, Manuscript in Harvard Law School Department of Special Collections, Cambridge.
  • Parsons, Robert. An Answere To The Fifth Part Of Reportes Lately set forth by Syr Edward Cooke, Knight, the Kingés Attorney Generall. Concerning The Ancient & Moderne Municipall lawes of England, which do Apperteyne to Spirituall Power & Iurisdiction. By Occasion Whereof, & of the Principall Question set downe in the Sequent page, there is laid forth an Evident, Plaine & Perspicuous. Demonstration of the Continuance of Catholicke Religion in England, from our first Kinges christened, Unto these dayes. St. Omer, France: English College Press, 1606.
  • ———. A Quiet and Sober Reckoning With M. Thomas Morton Somewhat Set in Choler by His Aduersary P. R.: Concerning Certaine Imputations of Wilfull Falsities Obiected to the Said T. m. in a Treatise of P. R. Intituled of Mitigation, Some Part Wherof bible Hath Lately Attempted to Answere in a Large Preamble to a More Ample Reioynder Promised by Him. But Here in the Meane Space the Said Imputations Are Iustified, and Confirmed, & with Much Increase of New Untruthes on His Part Returned Upon Him Againe: So as Finally the Reckoning Being Made, the Verdict of the Angell, Interpreted by Daniel, Is Verified of Him. There Is Also Adioyned a Peece of a Reckoning with Syr. Edward Cooke, Now L. Chief Iustice of the Comon Pleas, about a Nihil Dicit, & Some Other Points Uttered by Him in Two Late Preambles, to His Sixt and Seauenth Partes of Reports. St. Omer, France: English College Press, 1609.
  • Prynne, William. Brief Animadversions On, Amendments Of, & Additional Explanatory Records To, the Fourth Part of the Institutes of the Lawes of England, Concerning the Jurisdiction of Courts: Compiled by the Late Famous Lawyer, Sir Edward Cooke, Knight, Wherein the Misquotations, Mistakes of Records, Antiquities Cited in Them Are Rectified, Some Doubtful Passages Explained, Many Defective Omissions of Usefull Records Supplyed . . . : the Transcripts of Which Records out of The Originals, Are at Large Inserted, Many Others Chronologically and Briefly Quoted: with Several Tables Thereunto. . . . London: Thomas Ratcliffe and Thomas Daniel, 1669.
  • ———. Irenarches redivivus, Or, A briefe collection of sundry usefull andnecessarystatutes and petitions in Parliament (not hitherto published in print, but extant onely in the Parliament Rolls) concerning the necessity, utility,institution,qualification,jurisdiction, office, commission, oath, and against the causlesse, clandestine dis-commissioning of Justices of Peac fit to be publikely known and observed in these reforming times.: With some short deductions and a touch of the antiquity and institution of assertors and justices of peace in other forraign kingdomes. / Together with a full refutation of Sir Edward Cooks assertion, and the commonly received erronious opinion, of a difference between ordinances and Acts of Parliament in former age here cleerly manifested to be then but one and the same in all respects, and in point of the threefold assent. Published for the common good, by William Prynne of Lincolns-Inne. London: for Michael Spark at the Bible in Green-Arbor, 1648.
  • Zouch, Richard. The Jurisdiction of the Admiralty of England Asserted, Against Sr. Edward Coke’s Articuli Admiralitatis, in XXII Chapter of His Jurisdiction of Courts. London: F. Tyton and T. Dring, 1663.

IV. Noteworthy Mentions

  • Allen, Carleton Kemp. Law in the Making. 7th ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1964.
  • Baker, J. H. An Introduction to English Legal History. 3d ed. London: Butterworths, 1990.
  • Bendix, Reinhard. Kings or People: Power and the Mandate to Rule. Berkeley:University of California Press, 1978.
  • Friedrich, Carl Joachim. The Philosophy of Law in Historical Perspective. 2d. ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1958.
  • Gardiner, Samuel R. History of England from the Accession of James I to the Outbreak of the Civil War, 1603–1642. 10 vols. London: Longmans, Green & Co., 1884.
  • Helgerson, Richard. Forms of Nationhood: Elizabethan Writings of England. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992.
  • Hill, Christopher. Society and Puritanism in Pre-Revolutionary England. New York: Schocken Books, 1964.
  • Hirst, Derek. Authority and Conflict: England, 1603–1625. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1986.
  • Kantorowicz, Ernst H. The King’s Two Bodies: A Study in Medieval Political Theology. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1957.
  • McWhirter, Darien A. The Legal 100: A Ranking of the Individuals Who Have Most Influenced the Law. Secaucus, N.J.: The Citadel Press, 1998.
  • Plucknett, Theodore F. T. A Concise History of the Common Law. Rochester, N.Y.: Lawyers Co-operative Publishing Company, 1929.
  • Pound, Roscoe, and Theodore F. T. Plucknett. Readings on the History and System of the Common Law. Rochester: Lawyers Co-operative Publishing Company, 1927.
  • Radin, Max. Handbook of Anglo-American Legal History. St. Paul: West Publishing Co., 1936.
  • Schwartz, Bernard. The American Heritage History of Law in America. New York: McGraw Hill, 1974.
  • Smith, Alan G. R. The Emergence of a Nation State: The Commonwealth of England 1529–1660. London: Longman Group, 1984.
  • Sommerville, J. P. Politics and Ideology in England, 1603–1640. Harlow: Longmans, 1986.
  • Thatcher, Rt. Hon. Baroness Margaret. The Rule of Law in a Dangerous World. Washington, D.C.: National Legal Center for the Public Interest, 1994.
  • Turner, Edward Raymond. The Privy Council of England in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, 1603–1784. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press, 1927.
  • Wootton, David, ed. Divine Right and Democracy: An Anthology of Political Writing in Stuart England. London: Penguin, 1986.
  • Wormser, Rene A. The Story of the Law and the Men Who Made It—From the Earliest Times to the Present. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1962.

[1. ]N.B.: Works are not repeated in each of the various categories to which they pertain.

Last modified April 13, 2016