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American Political Writing during the Founding 1760-1805

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Source: American Political Writing During the Founding Era: 1760-1805, ed. Charles S. Hyneman and Donald Lutz (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1983). 2 vols. Volume 2. Chapter: A Selected List of Political Writings by Americans Between 1760 and 1805.

A Selected List of Political Writings by Americans Between 1760 and 1805

The following bibliography is based upon a comprehensive reading of the political literature of the founding era and is designed to assist those interested in the study of American political theory by identifying items worthy of attention. If the topic of the piece is not apparent from its title, the editors have, in most instances, provided annotation. If an item lacks annotation, as is the case with many sermons, this is because the content is either so broad as to defy easy categorization, or the content is so typical for such a piece that there is no point in repetitiously noting that fact. The information is sufficient for an investigator to be able to identify those pieces dealing with a specific topic he or she might wish to study. We enter no comment on the pieces printed in this collection.

The editors have roughly divided the items in the bibliography into three categories. If there is no asterisk, the piece is deemed of interest to someone studying American political theory, but the level of analysis is low. One asterisk identifies pieces with substantial theoretical content, and two asterisks indicate pieces that these editors feel are candidates for inclusion among the best theoretical writing by Americans during the founding era. Major bibliographies compiled by historians on some part of what is here defined as the founding era usually will be found to have a 20 to 30 percent overlap with the following bibliography. The items cited by such historians but not included below are not lacking in historical interest or importance, but simply do not have sufficient theoretical content or interest for inclusion here. A dagger at the end of a citation indicates a piece that is reproduced in these volumes.

A.

ITEMS WHERE THE AUTHOR IS KNOWN

  • 1 Adams, John. A Defence of the Constitutions of Government of the United States. 1787. In Charles Francis Adams, ed., Works of John Adams, (Boston, 1851), IV.**
  • 2 Adams, John [Novanglus]. (Untitled Essays). Boston Gazette, January 23, 30, February 20-April 17, 1775.*Written in response to essays by Massachusettensis [Daniel Leonard]. Reproduced in Merrill Jensen, ed., Tracts of the American Revolution, 1763-1776 (Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1978).
  • 3 Adams, John. Thoughts on Government. 1776. From Charles Francis Adams, ed., Works of John Adams (Boston, 1851), IV: 189-202.**†
  • 4 Adams, Samuel. The Rights of the Colonists. Boston, 1772. 11 pp. Reproduced in The Annals of A America, I: 217-220.
  • 5 Adams, Zabdiel. An Election Sermon. Boston, 1782. 59 pp.**†
  • 6 Addison, Alexander. Analysis of the Report of the Committee of the Virginia Assembly. Philadelphia, 1800. 52 pp.**†
  • 7 Addison, Alexander. A Charge to the Grand Juries of the County Courts in Pennsylvania. Philadelphia, 1798. 24 pp.Alien and Sedition Acts, free speech, and free press.
  • 8 Addison, Alexander. Liberty of Speech and of the Press: Charges to a Grand Jury. Albany, 1790. 16 pp.
  • 9 Alden, Timothy. The Glory of America. Portsmouth, N.H., 1802. 47 pp.
  • 10 Allen, Ira. Some Miscellaneous Remarks and Short Arguments on a Small Pamphlet . . . and Some Reasons Given Why the District of the New Hampshire Grants Had Best Be a State. Hartford, 1777. 26 pp.
  • 11 Allen, Ira. A Vindication of the Conduct of the General Assembly of the State of Vermont. Dresden. N.H., 1779. 48 pp.
  • 12 Allison, Patrick. Candid Animadversions on a Petition. . . . Baltimore, 1793. 47 pp.
  • 13 Ames, Fisher. The Dangers of American Liberty. Boston, 1805. 55 pp.**†
  • 14 Ames, Fisher. Laocoon No. 1. 1799. From Seth Ames, ed., Works of Fisher Ames (Boston, 1854), II: 109-115.Defends Federalists against charges by Jeffersonians.
  • 15 Atwater, Jeremiah. A Sermon. Middlebury, Vt., 1801. 39 pp.**†
  • 16 Austin, Benjamin [Honestus]. Observations on the Pernicious Practice of the Law. Boston, 1786, 52 pp.Lawyers are not needed for good government, but they have insinuated themselves into it with pernicious consequences.
  • 17 Austin, Benjamin Jr. To the Printers. Massachusetts Centinel, January 9, 1788.Supports proposed United States Constitution.
  • 18 Avery, David. Two Sermons on the Nature and Evil of Professors of Religion Not Bridling the Tongue. Boston, 1791. 66 pp.The tongue as the principal medium for displaying corruption, and the effect it has on people and society.
  • 19 Backus, Charles. A Sermon. Hartford, 1793. 38 pp.
  • 20 Backus, Isaac. Government and Liberty Described. Boston, 1778. 20 pp.
  • 21 Backus, Isaac. A Letter . . . Concerning Taxes to Support Religious Worship. Boston, 1771. 22 pp.Opposes such taxation.
  • 22 Backus, Isaac. Truth is Great and Will Prevail. Boston, 1781. 44 pp.
  • 23 Backus, Simon. A Dissertation on the Right and Obligation of the Civil Magistrate. Middletown, Conn., 1804. 38 pp.**Importance of religion to make oaths and compacts operative, preserve public virtue, and support self-government.
  • 24 Baldwin, Ebenezer. The Duty of Rejoicing Under Calamities and Afflictions. New York, 1776. 42 pp.A “God is an American” morale-booster during the War.
  • 25 Baldwin, Henry. A General View of the Origin and Nature of the Constitution and Government of New York. New York, 1780. 197 pp.
  • 26 Baldwin, Thomas. A Sermon (Election Day). Boston, 1802. 36 pp.
  • 27 Ball, Heman. Vermont Election Day Sermon. Bennington, 1804. 31 pp.A standard rehearsal of Whig political principles.
  • 28 Bancroft, Aaron. Massachusetts Election Day Sermon. Boston, 1801. 29 pp.Prosperity and political success of American colonies laid to the moral virtues of the people. Continued success depends upon preserving these virtues.
  • 29 Barlow, Joel. Advice to the Privileged Orders. . . . New York, 1794. 31 pp.**Principles that ought to govern the collection of public revenue.
  • 30 Barlow, Joel. A Letter to the National Convention of France on the Defects in the Constitution of 1791. New York, 1792. 31 pp.**†
  • 31 Barlow, Joel. To His Fellow Citizens of the United States. Letter II: On Certain Political Measures Proposed to Their Consideration. Philadelphia, 1801. 37 pp.**†
  • 32 Barnes, David. A Discourse on Education. Boston, 1803. 27 pp.**Comprehensive discussion of education—school, home, etc.
  • 33The Barrington-Bernard Correspondence, 1760-1770. Selections from 1765-1768. From Edward Channing and Archibald Cary Coolidge, eds., The Barrington-Bernard Correspondence, 1760-1770, Harvard Historical Studies, vol. XVII (Cambridge, Mass,: Harvard University, 1912), pp. 92-103, 244-293.
  • 34 Barton, William. The Constitutionalist: Addressed to Men of All Parties. Philadelphia, 1804. 49 pp.**Judiciary has a special responsibility to enforce Constitution.
  • 35 Baxter, Joseph. The Duty of a People to Pray to and Bless God for Their Rulers. . . . Boston, 1772. 36 pp.The duties of rulers.
  • 36 Bean, Joseph. Massachusetts Election Day Sermon. Boston, 1774. 36 pp.
  • 37 Beers, William P. An Address to the Legislature and People of the State of Connecticut. New Haven, 1791.*Cosmopolitan, contrasted with localist, spirit in political factions. Size of electorate and of the legislature important.
  • 38 Belknap, Jeremy. The History of New England, 3 vols.; vol. I, pp. 60-99; vol. III, pp. 252-287. Boston, 1791-1792.Equality and public virtue as the basis for true republicanism.
  • 39 Belsham, William. An Essay on the African Slave Trade. Philadelphia, 1790. 15 pp.Opposed to it.
  • 40 [Benezet, Anthony.] Brief Considerations on Slavery. Burlington, Vt., 1773. 16 pp.*
  • 41 Benezet, Anthony. A Caution and Warning to Great Britain . . . the Calamitous State of the Enslaved Negroes in the British Dominion. Philadelphia, 1767. 52 pp.
  • 42 Benezet, Anthony. A Mite Cast into the Treasury: Or, Observations on Slave-Keeping. Philadelphia, 1772. 14 pp.**Major spokesman for the Quaker position.
  • 43 Benezet, Anthony. Serious Considerations on Several Important Subjects. Philadelphia, 1778. 48 pp.Compendium of Quaker political principles.
  • 44 Benezet, Anthony. Some Observations on . . . Indian Natives of the Continent. Philadelphia, 1784. 59 pp.
  • 45 Benezet, Anthony. Thoughts on the Nature of War. . . . Philadelphia, 1766. 14 pp.*Statement of the Quaker position.
  • 46 Bernard, Francis. Select Letters on the Trade and Government of America. London, 1774. 130 pp.Prominent American explains how colonists see their government and place within the Empire.
  • 47 Binney, Barnabas. An Oration [re] . . . the Liberty of Choosing Our Own Religion. Boston, 1774. 44 pp.
  • 48 Bishop, Abraham. Oration . . . Before the Republicans of Connecticut. New Haven, 1801. 47 pp.*Characteristics of Federalists as seen by a partisan Republican.
  • 49 Bishop, Abraham. Proofs of a Conspiracy Against Christianity and the Government of the United States. Hartford, 1802. 135 pp.**A tirade against the Federalists, professionals, well-to-do, and those who attack Jefferson. Good on equality, Federalist rhetoric, elitism, and corruption.
  • 50 Bland, Richard [Common Sense]. The Colonel Dismounted: Or the Rector Vindicated. . . . Williamsburg, Va., 1764. 53 pp.**Discusses constitution of the colony. Reproduced in Bernard Bailyn, ed., Pamphlets of the American Revolution (Cambridge, Mass., Belknap Press, 1965).
  • 51 Bland, Richard, An Inquiry into the Rights of the British Colonies. Williamsburg, Va., 1766. 31 pp.**†
  • 52 Bollan, William. The Freedom of Speech and Writing Upon Public Affairs, Considered, With an Historical View. London, 1766.
  • 53 Bowdoin, James. A Philosophical Discourse, Addressed to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. . . . Boston, 1780. 16 pp.On the encouragement of knowledge.
  • 54 Bowen, Nathaniel. An Oration . . . in Commemoration of American Independence. 1802.A rehearsal of the reasons for separating from England.
  • 55 Boucher, Jonathan. On the Necessity of Popular Support of Government. 1763. From A View of the Causes and Consequences of the American Revolution (London, 1797), pp. 308-321.
  • 56 Bradbury, Thomas. The Ass: or, the Serpent, A Comparison Between the Tribes of Issachar and Dan, in Their Regard for Civil Liberty. First printed in London, 1712; reprinted in Newburyport, Mass., 1774. 22 pp.**†
  • 57 Braxton, Carter [A Native of This Colony]. An Address to the Convention of the Colony and Ancient Dominion of Virginia on the Subject of Government in General, and Recommending a Particular Form to Their Attention. Virginia Gazette, June 8 and 15, 1776.**†
  • 58 Brown, Charles Brockden. Alcuin, A Dialogue. New Haven, 1798. 38 pp.On the essential equality of the sexes. Reprinted in The Annals of America, vol. IV. 40 pp.
  • 59 Brown, William L. An Essay on the Natural Equality of Men. Philadelphia, 1793. 191 pp.
  • 60 Burk, John. The History of Virginia from its First Settlement to the Present Day. Williamsburg, Va. 1805.
  • 61 Burke, Aedanus. An Address to the Freemen of . . . South Carolina. Charleston, 1783.Proper treatment of colonials who maintained friendly relations with the British within territory held by British forces.
  • 62 Burke, Aedanus. Considerations on the Society or Order of Cincinnati. Charleston, 1783. 33 pp.
  • 63 Burnet, Matthias. Connecticut Election Day Sermon. Hartford, 1803. 29 pp.*Five conditions needed for order, peace, and security.
  • 64 Callender, John. An Historical Discourse on the Civil and Religious Affairs . . . of Rhode Island. 1739. Republished in 1783.On liberty of conscience.
  • 65 Carmichael, John. A Self-Defensive War Lawful, Proved in a Sermon. Lancaster, Penn., 1775. 25 pp.
  • 66 Case, Stephen [A Moderate Whig]. Defensive Arms Vindicated and the Lawfulness of the American War Made Manifest. 1783. 53 pp.*
  • 67 Chalmers, James [Candidus]. Plain Truth: Addressed to the Inhabitants of America, Containing, Remarks on a Late Pamphlet Entitled Common Sense. Philadelphia, March 13, 1776. 40 pp.In response to Thomas Paine’s pamphlet, Chalmers defends the British monarchical constitution and attacks the idea of republicanism.
  • 68 Champion, Judah. Christian and Civil Liberty. Hartford, 1776.The basis for civil liberty lies in Christian thought.
  • 69 [Chandler, Thomas B.] An Address from the Clergy of New York and New Jersey to the Episcopalians in Virginia. New York, 1771. 58 pp.
  • 70 Chandler, Thomas B. The Appeal Farther Defended. New York, 1771. 240 pp.
  • 71 Chandler, Thomas B. A Friendly Address . . . [re] Our Political Confusions. New York, 1774. 55 pp.
  • 72 [Chandler, Thomas B.] What Think Ye of the Congress Now? New York, 1775. 48 pp.
  • 73 Chase, Samuel [Publicola]. To the Voters of Anne-Arundel County. Maryland Journal, February 13, 1787. See also May 18, July 13, July 18, and August 31, the last few being entitled “To Aristides.”*A running battle with Aristides [Alexander Hanson] in which Publicola defends the right of the people to instruct their representatives.
  • 74 Chauncy, Charles. The Appeal of the Public Answered in Behalf of the Non-Episcopal Churches of America. Boston, 1768. 205 pp.
  • 75 Chipman, Nathaniel. Sketches of the Principles of Government. Rutland, Vt. 1793.*An analysis of the United States Constitution, and the principles that give it strength, by a Federalist.
  • 76 Clarendon, Earl of, to William Pym. Boston Gazette, January 27, 1766.*An English Whig lays out the basic Whig principles.
  • 77 Clark, Jonas. Massachusetts Election Day Sermon. Boston, 1781. 42 pp.*Uses an extended biological metaphor to stress the communitarian underpinnings to a just relationship between governors and the governed.
  • 78 Clinton, George, [Cato]. No. IV: To the Citizens of the State of New York. New York Journal, November 8, 1787.*Critical analysis of the proposed Constitution.
  • 79 Clinton, George [Cato]. No. VI: To the People of the State of New York. New York Journal, December 13, 1787.**Problems of taxation, dangers of aristocracy. Cato’s pamphlets are reproduced in Cecelia Kenyon, ed., The Antifederalists (Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1966).
  • 80 Cobbett, William. The Democratic Judge: or the Equal Liberty of the Press. Philadelphia, 1798. 102 pp.
  • 81 Cooper, David. An Inquiry into Public Abuses, Arising for Want of a Due Execution of Laws. Philadelphia, 1784.
  • 82 [Cooper, David.] Serious Address to the Rulers of America. Trenton, 1783. 22 pp.
  • 83 Cooper, Thomas. An Account of the Trial of Thomas Cooper. Philadelphia, 1800. 64 pp.Cooper edits the proceedings of the trial against him under the Alien and Sedition Acts.
  • 84 Coram, Robert. Political Inquiries, to which is Added a Plan for the Establishment of Schools Throughout the United States. Wilmington, 1791. 107 pp.**†
  • 85 Coxe, Tench [An American Citizen]. An Examination of the Constitution of the United States of America. . . . Philadelphia, 1788. 33 pp.*Theoretical support for the proposed Constitution.
  • 86 Coxe, Tench [An American Citizen]. On the Federal Government, No. 1 and No. 3. New York Packet, October 5 and 16, 1787, respectively.*Reproduced in Paul Leicester Ford, ed., Pamphlets on the Constitution of the United States (New York: Da Capo Press, 1968). Summarizes American political history showing how it leads naturally to the Constitution.
  • 87 Cumings, Henry. A Sermon (Election Day). Boston, 1783. 55 pp.
  • 88 Daggett, David. Sun-Beams May be Extracted from Cucumbers, But the Process Is Tedious: An Oration. New Haven, 1799. 28 pp.*A witty, sarcastic response by a Federalist to what he perceived to be the utopianism on the part of the opposition.
  • 89 Dana, James. Connecticut Election Day Sermon. Hartford, 1779. 46 pp.*Foundations of good government are rooted in the word of God. Good on virtue, oaths, and basic principles of government.
  • 90 Dana, Samuel W. Essay on Political Society. Philadelphia, 1800. 234 pp.On the supremacy of the Constitution and how it is to be enforced. Pages after 193 contain discussion of judicial review.
  • 91 Dickinson, John. Essay on the Constitutional Power of Great Britain. Philadelphia, 1774. 127 pp.*Relationship of colonies to Britain.
  • 92 Dickinson, John. The Late Regulations Respecting the British Colonies on the Continent of America. . . . Philadelphia, 1765. 38 pp.A response to the Stamp Act. Reproduced in Bernard Bailyn, ed., Pamphlets of the American Revolution.
  • 93 Dickinson, John. Letters of a Farmer [On British Policy Affecting the American Colonies]. 1767. In The Political Writings of John Dickinson, I:167-276.*Letter XII especially good on basic principles. Letters I, II, IV, VI, IX, and X are reproduced in Jensen, ed., Tracts of the American Revolution.
  • 94 Dickinson, John [Fabius]. Letters to the Editor. Delaware Gazette, 1788.*These nine letters in support of the Constitution are reproduced in Ford. ed., Pamphlets on the Constitution of the United States.
  • 95 Dickinson, Samuel F. An Oration in Celebration of American Independence. Northampton, Mass., 1798. 23 ppHow political institutions and conduct of government respond to manners and taste.
  • 96 Doggett, Simeon. A Discourse on Education. New Bedford, 1796.Reproduced in Frederick Rudolph, ed., Essays on Education in the Early Republic (Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press, 1965), pp. 147-166.*
  • 97 Dorr, Edward. The Duty of Civil Rulers: A Connecticut Election Sermon. Hartford, 1765. 34 pp.**Favors support of Church by State, and protection of Church and religion from injurious behavior.
  • 98 Downer, Silas [A Son of Liberty]. A Discourse at the Dedication of the Tree of Liberty. Providence, 1768. 16 pp.**†
  • 99 Drayton, William Henry. The Charge to the Grand Jury. South Carolina and American General Gazette, May 8, 1776.Precursor to the Declaration of Independence in laying out grounds for breaking with England.*
  • 100 Dulaney, Daniel. Considerations on the Propriety of Imposing Taxes in the British Colonies . . . By Parliament. Annapolis, 1765. 55 pp.*Against virtual representation and the right of Parliament to tax colonists. Reproduced in Bailyn, ed., Pamphlets of the American Revolution.
  • 101 Dwight, Theodore. An Oration on the Anniversary of American Independence. Hartford, 1801. 31 pp.*A Federalist opposed to “levelling” by Jeffersonians. Opposes separating State and religion—discusses public schools, moral and religious instruction, literacy, religion, etc.
  • 102 Dwight, Theodore. An Oration, Spoken Before the Connecticut Society, for the Promotion of Freedom and the Relief of Persons Unlawfully Holden in Bondage. Hartford, 1794. 24 pp.**†
  • 103 Dwight, Timothy. A Discourse on Some Events of the Last Century. New Haven, 1801. 55 pp.*Summation of the state of American people, especially in morals and religion. A diatribe against the Enlightenment, self-interest, commercialism—all put at the door of freemasonry.
  • 104 Dwight, Timothy. The Nature and Danger of Infidel Philosophy. . . . New Haven, 1798. 95 pp.*An earlier and inferior version of the previous piece.
  • 105 Dwight, Timothy. Sermon Before the Connecticut Society of Cincinnati. New Haven, 1795. 40 pp.*Excellent discussion of virtue and politics.
  • 106 Dwight, Timothy. The True Means of Establishing Public Happiness. New Haven, 1795. 40 pp.The importance of religion and virtue.
  • 107 Dwight, Timothy. Virtuous Rulers A National Blessing. New Haven, 1791. 42 pp.
  • 108 Eliot, Andrew. Massachusetts Election Day Sermon. Boston, 1765. 49 pp.**On qualities of good public officials and their relations with the citizenry. Subtle and practical.
  • 109 Ellsworth, Oliver. The Landholder, VII. Connecticut Courant, December 17, 1787,On religious tests.
  • 110 Emerson, William. An Oration . . . In Commemoration of the Anniversary of American Independence. Boston, 1802. 25 pp.**Discusses prevailing attitudes about equality, liberty, rights; and how manners and way of life support these commitments.
  • 111 Emmons, Nathanael. A Discourse. Delivered on the National Fast, Wrentham, Mass., 1799. 31 pp.**†
  • 112 Emmons, Nathanael. A Discourse . . . in Commemoration of American Independence. Wrentham, Mass., 1802. 24 pp.*Character of American political system—mixed regime; similarity of American independence to Jewish independence.
  • 113 Evans, Israel. New Hampshire Election Day Sermon. Concord, N.H., 1791. 35 pp.*Interrelationships of religion, liberty, and just government.
  • 114 Farmer, A. W. A View of the Controversy Between Great Britain and Her Colonies. . . . New York, 1774. 37 pp.*A reply to Alexander Hamilton’s Full Vindication, which, in turn, had been a reply to an earlier pamphlet by Farmer—Free Thoughts on the Proceedings. . . . Very much a Tory.
  • 115 Findley, William. History of the Insurrection in the Four Western Counties of Pennsylvania. . . . Philadelphia, 1796. 328 pp.
  • 116 Fish, Elisha. A Discourse. Worcester, 1775. 28 pp.
  • 117 [Fitch, Thomas.] Reasons Why the British Colonies in America, Should Not Be Charged With Internal Taxes, by Authority of Parliament. New Haven, 1764. 39 pp.*Reproduced in Bailyn, ed., Pamphlets of the American Revolution.
  • 118 Fobes, Peres [Perez]. An Election Sermon. Boston, 1795. 42 pp.**†
  • 119 Ford, Timothy [Americanus]. The Constitutionalist: Or, An Inquiry How Far It Is Expedient and Proper to Alter the Constitution of South Carolina. City Gazette and Daily Advertiser, Charleston, 1794. 55 pp.**†
  • 120 Ford, Timothy. An Enquiry into the Constitutional Authority of the Supreme Federal Court Over the Several States. Charleston, 1792. 40 pp.
  • 121 Foster, Dan. A Short Essay on Civil Government. Hartford, 1775. 73 pp.Origin and nature of government.
  • 122 Franklin, Benjamin. An Account of the Supremest Court of Judicature in Pennsylvania, viz., The Court of the Press. Philadelphia Federal Gazette, February 12, 1789.**†
  • 123 Franklin, Benjamin. Advice to a Young Tradesman from an Old One. Worcester Magazine, Third Week in August, 1786, pp. 247-248.*The capitalist ethic and behavior appropriate to it.
  • 124 French, Jonathan. A Sermon. Boston, 1796. 23 pp.
  • 125 [Gale, Benjamin.] Brief, Decent, but Free Remarks on Several Laws. Hartford, 1782. 55 pp.
  • 126 Galloway, Joseph. A Candid Examination of the Mutual Claims of Great Britain and the Colonies. . . . New York, 1775, 62 pp.**Galloway’s rebuttal of the case for separation. Reproduced in Jensen, ed., Tracts of the American Revolution.
  • 127 Galloway, Joseph. A Letter to the People of Pennsylvania. . . . Philadelphia, 1760. 17 pp.Justifies an independent judiciary.
  • 128 Galloway, Joseph. A Reply to an Address. . . . New York, 1775. 42 pp.Galloway answers someone who severely attacked his Candid Examination. . . . Says colonies integral part of Great Britain.
  • 129 Gerry, Elbridge [A Columbian Patriot]. Observations on the New Constitution, and on the Federal and State Conventions. Boston, 1788.*Reproduced in Ford, ed., Pamphlets on the Constitution of the United States.
  • 130 Gordon, William. The History of the Rise, Progress, and Establishment of the Independence of the United States of America. 3 vols. New York, 1794.
  • 131 Gray, Robert. New Hampshire Election Day Sermon. Dover, N.H., 1798. 29 pp.The requisites for a great nation.
  • 132 [Grey, Isaac.] A Serious Address to Quakers. Philadelphia, 1778. 44 pp.
  • 133 Griffith, David. Passive Obedience Considered: A Sermon. Williamsburg, Va., 1776. 26 pp.The right of resistance—drawn from biblical passages.
  • 134 Hamilton, Alexander, James Madison, and John Jay [Publius]. The Federalist Papers. Published between October 27, 1787 and May 28, 1788 with individual essays appearing primarily, but not exclusively, in four New York papers: the Independent Journal, the New York Packet, the New York Daily Advertiser, and the New-York Journal and Daily Patriotic Register. The eighty-five essays have been published together in book form a number of times, with the best available being Jacob E. Cooke, ed., The Federalist (Cleveland: Meridian Books, 1961).**
  • 135 Hammon, Jupiter. Address to the Negroes of New York. New York, 1787. 20 pp.
  • 136 Hanson, Alexander. To the People of Maryland. Maryland Journal, April 13, June 22, and August 14, 1787, (last one titled “To Publicola”).Formerly writing under “J.B.F.” Hanson continues debate with Publicola [Samuel Chase] and argues against the people giving binding instructions to their representatives.
  • 137 Hanson, Alexander [Aristides]. Remarks on the Proposed Plan of a Federal Government. Annapolis, 1788. 42 pp.*Reproduced in Ford, ed., Pamphlets on the Constitution of the United States.
  • 138 Hart, Levi. Liberty Described and Recommended: in a Sermon Preached to the Corporation of Freemen in Farmington. Hartford, 1775. 23 pp.**†
  • 139 Haven, Jason. Massachusetts Election Day Sermon. Boston, 1769. 54 pp.Civil order and disobedience.
  • 140 Hawkins, Benjamin, et. al. Articles of a Treaty . . . [with] the Head Men and Warriors of the Cherokees. April, 1786.*
  • 141 Hay, George [Hortensius]. An Essay on the Liberty of the Press. Philadelphia, 1799.Legalistic discussion of requiring security of good behavior for publishers under indictment for libel.
  • 142 Hay, James. [A Virginian Born and Bred]. Remarks on the Bill of Rights and Constitution . . . of the State of Virginia. 1796. 35 pp.Arguments for writing a new state constitution to remedy the defects of the 1776 document.
  • 143 Hemmenway, Moses. Massachusetts Election Day Sermon. Boston, 1784. 52 pp.**Liberty in (1) state of nature, (2) civil society, and (3) the Church; limits on rulers in each of these; rights and duties of individuals; sources of authority.
  • 144 Hicks, William [A Citizen]. The Nature and Extent of Parliamentary Power Considered. Pennsylvania Journal, January 21-February 25, 1786.American colonists equal to British people.
  • 145 Hillhouse, William. A Dissertation, In Answer to a Late Lecture on the Political State of America. New Haven, 1789. 23 pp.A Federalist defends proposed Constitution.
  • 146 Hilliard, Timothy. An Oration (July 4). Portland, Maine, 1803. 20 pp.
  • 147 Hilliard, Isaac. The Rights of Suffrage. Danbury, 1804. 64 pp.
  • 148 Hitchcock, Gad. An Election Sermon. Boston, 1774. 56 pp.**†
  • 149 Hitchcock, Gad. A Sermon [Thanksgiving]. Boston, 1775. 44 pp.**On liberty—natural, civil, and religious.
  • 150 [Hoar, David] Natural Principles of Liberty, Virtue, etc., Boston, 1782. 12 pp.
  • 151 Holdfast, Simon. Facts Are Stubborn Things, Or Nine Plain Questions. Hartford, 1803. 23 pp.A Federalist defends Connecticut’s long-standing commitment to restricted suffrage, and to state support for education.
  • 152 Hopkins, Samuel. A Dialogue Concerning the Slavery of the Africans. New York, 1776. 71 pp.*Rebuttal of all arguments for continued slavery.
  • 153 Hopkins, Stephen. The Rights of Colonies Examined. Providence Gazette, December 22, 1764.**†
  • 154 Hotchkiss, Frederick W. On National Greatness. New Haven, 1793. 23 pp.
  • 155 Howard, Martin Jr. A Letter from a Gentleman at Halifax, To His Friend in Rhode Island, Containing Remarks Upon a Pamphlet Entitled “The Rights of Colonies Examined”. Newport, R.I. 1765.Attacks the pamphlet by Stephen Hopkins.
  • 156 Howard, Simeon. Massachusetts Election Day Sermon. Boston, 1780. 48 pp.*Characteristics of good rulers: need for educated population; emphasis upon virtue. Government should encourage piety.
  • 157 Howard, Simeon. A Sermon Preached to the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company in Boston. Boston, 1773. 43 pp.**†
  • 158 Humphreys, Daniel. The Inquirer: Being an Examination of the Question Whether the Legitimate Powers of Government Extend to the Care of Religion. Boston, 1801. 47 pp.*
  • 159 Huntington, Enoch. Political Wisdom, Or Honesty the Best Policy. Middletown, Conn., 1786. 20 pp.The qualities desirable in public officials.
  • 160 Huntington, Joseph. God Ruling the Nations for the Most Glorious Ends. Hartford, 1784. 34 pp.*Efforts by elected officials to rule justly are being thwarted by public distrust.
  • 161 Hurt, John. The Love of Our Country, A Sermon Preached Before the Virginia Troops. Philadelphia, 1777. 23 pp.
  • 162 Inglis, Charles. The Letters of Papinian: in which the Conduct, Present State and Prospects, of the American Congress, Are Examined. New York, 1779. 150 pp.
  • 163 Inglis, Charles. The True Interest of America Impartially Stated, In Certain Strictures on a Pamphlet Intitled “Common Sense”. Philadelphia, 1776. 71 pp.A Tory attacking Paine’s pamphlet rehearses all the costs likely to be incurred with independence.
  • 164 Iredell, James [Marcus] Answer to Mr. [George] Mason’s Objections to the New Constitution. . . . 1788.*Reproduced in Ford, ed., Pamphlets on the Constitution of the United States.
  • 165 Jackson, Jonathan [A Native of Boston]. Thoughts Upon the Political Situation of the United States of America. . . . Worcester, 1788. 209 pp.**A Whiggish analysis of the Massachusetts Constitution in comparison with the proposed United States Constitution.
  • 166 Jay, John [A Citizen of New York]. An Address to the People of the State of New York on the Subject of the Constitution Agreed Upon at Philadelphia, the 17th of September, 1787. 1788.*Reproduced in Ford, ed., Pamphlets on the Constitution of the United States.
  • 167 Jefferson, Thomas. Notes on the State of Virginia, edited by William Peden. Chapel Hill, 1955.**
  • 168 Jefferson, Thomas. A Summary View of the Rights of British America. Williamsburg, Va., 1774. 23 pp.*Reproduced in Jensen, ed., Tracts of the American Revolution.
  • 169 Johnson, John Barent. An Oration on Union. New York, 1794. 24 pp.
  • 170 Johnson, Stephen. A Connecticut Election Sermon. New London, 1770. 39 pp.**Good on general Whig principles.
  • 171 Johnson, Stephen. Integrity and Piety the Best Principles of a Good Administration of Government. New London, 1770. 39 pp.
  • 172 Jones, David. Defensive War in a Just Cause [is] Sinless. Philadelphia, 1775. 27 pp.
  • 173 Keith, Isaac S. The Friendly Influence of Religion and Virtue. Charleston, 1789. 24 pp.
  • 174 Kendal, Samuel. Religion the Only Sure Basis of Free Government. Boston, 1804. 34 pp.**†
  • 175 Kendal, Samuel. A Sermon. Boston, 1794. 35 pp.*Liberty dependent upon a regime of order.
  • 176 Kent, James. Dissertations . . . Preliminary Part of a Course of Law Lectures. New York, 1795. 87 pp.**Main forms of government and their respective merits; development of self-government in America; principles of law governing nations.
  • 177 Kent, James. An Introductory Lecture to a Course of Law Lectures. New York, 1794. 23 pp.**†
  • 178 Keteltas, Abraham. God Arising and Pleading His People’s Cause. Boston, 1777. 32 pp.
  • 179 Kirkland, John T. A Sermon. . . . Boston, 1795. 35 pp.Wars are evil, but some good effects arise from them.
  • 180 Knox, Samuel. An Essay on the Best System of Liberal Education, Adapted to the Genius of the Government of the United States. . . . 1799.*Reproduced in Rudolph, ed., Essays on Education in the Early Republic, pp. 271-372.
  • 181 Knox, William. Massachusetts Election Day Sermon. Boston, 1769. 100 pp.
  • 182 De Lafitte Du Courteil, Amable-Louis-Rose. Proposal to Demonstrate the Necessity of a National Institution in the United States of America, for the Education of Children of Both Sexes. . . . Philadelphia, 1797.*Reproduced in Rudolph, ed., Essays on Education in the Early Republic.
  • 183 Lathrop, John. Innocent Blood Crying to God: Boston Massacre Sermon. Boston, 1771. 21 pp.
  • 184 Lathrop, John. A Sermon Preached to the Artillery Company in Boston. Boston, 1774. 39 pp.*Circumstances under which Christians are justified in going to war.
  • 185 Lathrop, Joseph. The Happiness of a Free Government. Springfield, Mass., 1794. 22 pp.
  • 186 Lathrop, Joseph. A Miscellaneous Collection of Original Pieces. Springfield, Mass., 1786. 168 pp.**†
  • 187 Lathrop, Joseph. A Sermon. Springfield, Mass., 1787. 24 pp.
  • 188 Lee, Arthur. An Appeal to the Justice and Interests of the People of Great Britain. New York, 1775. 32 pp.
  • 189 Lee, Charles. Defense of the Alien and Sedition Laws. Philadelphia, 1798. 47 pp.
  • 190 Lee, Richard Henry. Letters from the Federal Farmer to the Republican. Letters II and III out of 18 published in 1787.**Reproduced in Ford, ed., Pamphlets on the Constitution of the United States.
  • 191 Leib, Michael. Patriotic Speech. New London, 1796. 24 pp.
  • 192 Leland, John. A Blow at the Root. 1801. In L. F. Greene, ed., The Writings of John Leland (New York: Arno Press, 1969), pp. 235-55.*
  • 193 Leland, John. The Connecticut Dissenters’ Strong Box: No. I. New London, 1802. 40 pp.**†
  • 194 Leland, John. An Elective Judiciary. . . . 1805. In L. F. Greene, ed., The Writings of John Leland, pp. 285-300.
  • 195 Leland, John. The Rights of Conscience Inalienable. . . . 1791. In L. F. Greene, ed., The Writings of John Leland, pp. 179-192.
  • 196 Leland, John [Jack Nips] The Yankee Spy. Boston, 1794. 20 pp.**†
  • 197 Leonard, Daniel [Massachusettensis] The Origin of the Contest With Great Britain. New York, 1775. 86 pp.**Balanced, detailed analysis urging caution and accommodation.
  • 198 Leonard, Daniel [Massachusettensis]. To All Nations of Men. Massachusetts Spy, November 18, 1773.*†
  • 199 Lewis, Isaac. A Sermon Preached Before . . . the Governor . . . and Legislature. Hartford, 1797. 31 pp.*Basic principles, religion, virtue, and godliness.
  • 200 Linn, William. A Discourse on National Sins. New York, 1798. 37 pp.Religion, government, prosperity, and how all can be undercut by sin.
  • 201 Livingston, Philip. The Other Side of the Question . . . A Defence of the Liberties of North America. Boston, 1774. 29 pp.
  • 202 Livingston, Robert. The Address of Mr. Justice Livingston to the House of Assembly in Support of His Right to a Seat. New York, 1769.New York Assembly cannot, according to Livingston, deny a seat in that body to justices of the colony’s supreme court.
  • 203 Livingston, Robert R. An Oration. New York, 1787. 22 pp.
  • 204 Livingston, William. Observations on Government, Including Some Animadversions on Mr. Adams’s “Defence of the Constitutions. . . .” New York, 1787. 56 pp.**
  • 205 Livingston, William. On the Use, Abuse, and Liberty of the Press. 1753.Reproduced in Leonard W. Levy, ed., Freedom of the Press from Zenger to Jefferson: Early American Libertarian Theories (Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1966).
  • 206 Logan, George. Five Letters Addressed to the Yeomanry. Philadelphia, 1792. 28 pp.Presses for social and economic equality.
  • 207 Lyman, Joseph. A Sermon, (Election Day). Boston, 1787. 61 pp.
  • 208 MacClintock, Samuel. A Sermon Preached Before the Honorable the Council. Portsmouth, N.H., 1784. 47 pp.*Comprehensive on Whig principles from religious point of view.
  • 209 McKeen, Joseph. Massachusetts Election Day Sermon. Boston, 1800. 30 pp.**Qualities and conduct of good rulers and relation of religion to same. Wisdom and virtue preferred to brilliance.
  • 210 Madison, James. An Extensive Republic Meliorates. 1787. In Gaillard Hunt, ed., The Writings of James Madison (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1901), 2:365-369.**
  • 211 Madison, James. Letter to T. Jefferson, Oct. 24, 1787. In Gaillard Hunt, ed., The Writings of James Madison (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1901), 2:18-35.**Incisive summary of much debate at constitutional convention.
  • 212 Madison, James. Vices of the Political System of the United States. 1787. In Gaillard Hunt, ed., The Writings of James Madison, 2:36-69.**
  • 213 Madison, James, et. al. Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments [in Virginia]. 1785. In Gaillard Hunt, ed., The Writings of James Madison (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1901), 2:183-191.**†
  • 214 Mason, John Mitchell. The Voice of Warning to Christians. 1800.Jefferson cannot fulfill obligations of office because he is an atheist.
  • 215 Mason, Jonathan. An Oration. New York, 1780. 40 pp.The necessity of patriotism for maintaining freedom, justice, etc.
  • 216 Maxcy, Jonathan. An Oration. Providence, 1799. 16 pp.**†
  • 217 Mayhew, Jonathan. On the Limits of Obligation to Obey Government. 1750.**No state of nature or compact—good of the people. Reproduced in Bailyn, ed., Pamphlets of the American Revolution.
  • 218 Mellen, John. A Great and Happy Doctrine. Boston, 1795. 34 pp.
  • 219 Mellen, John. Massachusetts Election Day Sermon. Boston, 1797. 36 pp.**Origin of government, basis for political obligation, basis for resistance, guide for good rulers and for deposing them.
  • 220 Messer, Asa. An Oration . . . in the Baptist Meeting House on the 4th of July. . . . Providence, 1803. 14 pp.*On the relation of knowledge, virtue, and religion to popular government.
  • 221 Miller, Samuel. A Discourse [to] the Society for Manumission of Slaves. New York, 1797. 36 pp.
  • 222 Minot, George Richard. The History of the Insurrections in Massachusetts, in the year 1776 and the Rebellion Consequent Thereon. Worcester, 1788. 192 pp.
  • 223 Moore, Zephaniah Swift. An Oration on the Anniversary of the Independence of the United States of America. Worcester, 1802. 24 pp.**†
  • 224 Morse, Jedidiah. A Sermon Exhibiting the Present Dangers and Consequent Duties of the Citizens of the United States. Charlestown, Mass., 1799. 59 pp.Defense of the right and duty of ministers to preach on political subjects; posits a French plot to undermine United States government, and silencing ministry part of this.
  • 225 Moultrie, William. Memoirs of the American Revolution so far as it Related . . . North and South Carolina, and Georgia, vols. I and II. 1802.
  • 226 Nicholas, George. A Letter . . . Justifying the Conduct of the Citizens of Kentucky [re: Kentucky Resolutions of 1798]. Lexington, Ky., 1798. 42 pp.
  • 227 Niles, Nathaniel. Two Discourses on Liberty. Newburyport, Mass., 1774. 38 pp.**†
  • 228 Osgood, David. A Discourse. Boston, 1795. 40 pp.*
  • 229 Osgood, David. A Sermon. Boston, 1788. 20 pp.
  • 230 Osgood, David. A Thanksgiving Sermon. Boston, 1794. 20 pp.
  • 231 Otis, James. The Rights of the British Colonies Asserted and Proved. Boston Gazette, July 23, 1764.**Reproduced in Bailyn, ed., Pamphlets of the American Revolution.
  • 232 Otis, James. A Vindication of the British Colonies Against the Aspersions of the Halifax Gentleman, in His Letter to a Rhode Island Friend. Boston, 1765.*Response to pamphlet by Martin Howard. Reproduced in Bailyn, ed., Pamphlets of the American Revolution.
  • 233 Page, John. An Address to the Citizens of the District of York, in Virginia. Richmond, 1794.
  • 234 Paine, Thomas. Common Sense Addressed to the Inhabitants of America. Philadelphia, January 9, 1776. 45 pp.**Reproduced in Jensen, ed., Tracts of the American Revolution.
  • 235 Parker, Samuel. A Sermon. Boston, 1793. 42 pp.
  • 236 Parsons, Jonathon. A Consideration of Some Unconstitutional Measures Adopted and Practiced in This State. Newburyport, Mass., 1784. 24 pp.
  • 237 Parsons, Theodore. A Forensic Dispute on the Legality of Enslaving the Africans. Boston, 1773. 48 pp.
  • 238 Parsons, Theophilus. The Essex Result. Newburyport, Mass., 1778. 68 pp.**†
  • 239 Payson, Phillips. A Sermon. Boston, 1778. 30 pp.**†
  • 240 Payson, Seth. A Sermon. Portsmouth, N.H., 1799. 23 pp.
  • 241 Peck, Jedidiah. The Political Wars of Otsego: Downfall of Jacobinism and Despotism. . . . Cooperstown, N.Y., 1796. 123 pp.Dangers of levelling spirit.
  • 242 Perkins, John. [A Well-Wisher to Mankind]. Theory of Agency: Or, An Essay on the Nature, Source and Extent of Moral Freedom. Boston, 1771. 43 pp.**†
  • 243 Pinkney, William. Speech in the House of Delegates of Maryland. Philadelphia, 1790. 22 pp.Supports legislation (a) prohibiting shipment of slaves to the West Indies, (b) removing restrictions on manumission of slaves.
  • 244 Pope, Nathaniel. A Speech. Richmond, 1800. 37 pp.Concerning the Sedition Act.
  • 245 Porter, Nathaniel. A Discourse (Election Day Sermon). Concord, N.H., 1804. 34 pp.*On the qualities and conduct of good rulers.
  • 246 Prescott, Benjamin. A Free and Calm Consideration of the Unhappy Misunderstanding. . . Between the Parliament of Great Britain and These American Colonies. Salem, Mass., 1774. 52 pp.*
  • 247 Price, Richard. Observations on the Nature of Civil Liberty. New York Gazette and Weekly Mercury, July 22, 1776.*
  • 248 Quincy, Josiah. Observations on the . . . Boston Port Bill With Thoughts on Civil Society and Standing Armies. Boston, 1774. 82 pp.*
  • 249 Quincy, Josiah. An Oration. Boston, 1798. 31 pp.
  • 250 Ramsay, David. An Address to the Freemen of South Carolina, On the Subject of the Federal Constitution. . . . Charleston, 1788, 12 pp.Reproduced in Ford, ed., Pamphlets on the Constitution of the United States, (Brooklyn, 1888), pp. 373-380.
  • 251 Ramsay, David. The History of the American Revolution. Philadelphia, 1789. 390 pp.**†
  • 252 Ramsay, David. The History of the Revolution of South Carolina. 2 vols. Trenton, 1785.*
  • 253 Ramsay, David. An Oration on the Advantages of American Independence. Pennsylvania Gazette, January 20, 1779.The arts and sciences in a new republic.
  • 254 Randolph, Edmund. Letter on the Federal Constitution. October 16, 1787.*Found in Ford, ed., Pamphlets on the Constitution of the United States (Brooklyn, 1888), pp. 261-276.
  • 255 Reese, Thomas. An Essay on the Influence of Religion, in Civil Society. Charleston, 1788. 87 pp.
  • 256 Rice, David. Slavery Inconsistent With Justice and Good Policy. Augusta, Ky., 1792. 23 pp.**†
  • 257 Ross, Robert. A Sermon [on] the Union of the Colonies. New York, 1776. 28 pp*.The reasons for separating from Britain.
  • 258 Rush, Benjamin. [A Pennsylvanian]. An Address to the Inhabitants of the British Settlements in America Upon Slave-Keeping. Philadelphia, 1773. 28 pp.**†
  • 259 Rush, Benjamin. Considerations on the Injustice and Impolicy of Punishing Murder by Death. Philadelphia, 1792. 19 pp.
  • 260 Rush, Benjamin. Considerations Upon the Present Test-Law of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia, 1784. 23 pp.In opposition to oaths. Rush was a prominent Quaker.
  • 261 Rush, Benjamin. Essays Litarary, Moral and Philosophical. Philadelphia, 1798.
  • 262 Rush, Benjamin. On the Superiority of a Bicameral to a Unicameral Legislature. Philadelphia, 1777. 24 pp.*
  • 263 Rush, Benjamin. A Plan for the Establishment of Public Schools and the Diffusion of Knowledge in Pennsylvania; To Which Are Added, Thoughts upon the Mode of Education, Proper in a Republic. Philadelphia, 1786. 23 pp.*†
  • 264

    B.

    ITEMS WHERE THE AUTHOR IS DISPUTED OR UNKNOWN

    • 354The Address and Petition of a Number of the Clergy of Various Denominations . . . Relative to the Passing of a Law Against Vice and Immorality. Philadelphia, 1793. 13 pp.Proposes outlawing theatrical exhibitions, among other things.
    • 355An Address of the Convention for Framing a New Constitution of Government of the State of New Hampshire. Portsmouth, N.H., 1781. 64 pp.Why the old constitution is deficient.
    • 356 Aequus. From the Craftsman [London]. Massachusetts Gazette and Boston Newsletter, March 6, 1766.**†
    • 357 Agricola. [untitled essay]. Massachusetts Spy, October 22, 1772.**Very Lockian statement of basic principles on government.
    • 358 Agrippa [James Winthrop?] Massachusetts Gazette, November 23-February 5, 1788.Reproduced in Ford, ed., Pamphlets on the Constitution of the United States.
    • 359 Amendments Proposed to the Federal Constitution Proposed by the New York State Convention. Boston Gazette, August 18, 1788.*
    • 360 Amicus. To the Printer. Columbian Herald, Columbia, S.C., August 28, 1788.Anti-Federalist statement on the right of recall.
    • 361 Amicus Republicae. Address to the Public, Containing Some Remarks on the Present Political State of the American Republicks, etc. Exeter, 1786. 36 pp.**†
    • 362 [anon.] Address of a Convention of Delegates from the Abolition Society, to the Citizens of the United States. Philadelphia, 1794. 7 pp.
    • 363 [anon.] An Address . . . Respecting the Alien and Sedition Laws. Richmond, 1798. 63 pp.
    • 364 [anon.] An Address to the Inhabitants of the County of Berkshire Respecting Their Present Opposition to Civil Government. Hartford, 1778. 28 pp.*
    • 365 [anon.] The Alarm: or, an Address to the People of Pennsylvania, on the Late Resolve of Congress, for Totally Suppressing All Power and Authority Derived from the Crown of Great Britain. Philadelphia, 1776. 4 pp.**†
    • 366 [anon.] Ambition. City Gazette and Daily Advertiser, Charleston, June 6, 1789.*†
    • 367 [anon.] Boston Gazette, September 17, 1764**†
    • 368 [anon.] A Candid Examination of the Address of the Minority of the Council of Censors. Philadelphia, 1784. 40 pp.
    • 369 [anon.] Declaration and Address of His Majesty’s Loyal Associated Refugees, Assembled at Rhode Island. New York, 1779. 36 pp.
    • 370 [anon.] A Declaration of Independence Published by the Congress at Philadelphia in 1776 With a Counter-Declaration Published at New York in 1781. New York, 1781. 24 pp.The Tories declare their independence from revolutionary America.
    • 371 [anon.] Discussion of Revision of South Carolina’s Code of Law. City Gazette and Daily Advertiser, Charleston, February 3, 1789.
    • 372 [anon.] Dissertation Upon the Constitutional Freedom of the Press. Boston, 1801. 54 pp.
    • 373 [anon.] An English Patriot’s Creed, Anno Domini, 1775. Massachusetts Spy, January 19, 1776.*†
    • 374 [anon.] An Essay of a Frame of Government for Pennsylvania. Philadelphia, 1776. 16 pp.*Summary of Whig ideas, with specific proposals for a state constitution.
    • 375 [anon.] An Essay Upon Government. Philadelphia, 1775. 125 pp.**Origin of government; society, government, and property defined; authority and obligations of rulers; and the rights and obligations of citizens.
    • 376 [anon.] A Few Salutary Hints Pointing out the Policy and Consequences of Permitting British Subjects to Engross Our Trade and Become Our Citizens. Charleston, 1786. 16 pp.
    • 377 [anon.] Four Letters on Interesting Subjects. Philadelphia, 1776. 24 pp.**†
    • 378 [anon.] A Friend to the Judiciary. New York, 1801. 60 pp. Concerning the independence of the judiciary.
    • 379 [anon.] An Impartial Review of the Rise and Progress of the Controversy Between . . . Federalists and Republicans. Philadelphia, 1800. 50 pp.
    • 380 [anon.] A Letter from a Virginian to the Members of the Continental Congress. Boston, 1774. 31 pp.*A restrained, even-tempered plea for Congress to be patient and to seek accommodation with Britain.
    • 381 [anon.] Letter to a Member of the General Assembly of Virginia on the Subject of a Conspiracy of the Slaves. Richmond, 1801. 21 pp.
    • 382 [anon.] Letter to the Editor. Boston Gazette, July 22, 1765.*“No taxation without representation” applied to western Massachusetts towns vis-a-vis Massachusetts legislature.
    • 383 [anon.] Letter to the Editor. Massachusetts Spy, April 4, 1771.*The nature of government.
    • 384 [anon.] Letter to the Editor. Massachusetts Spy, August 22, 1771.The nature of government.
    • 385 [anon.] Letter to the Editor. Boston Gazette, December 31, 1787.*Short, pithy summary of views on education.
    • 386 [anon.] A Letter to the People of Pennsylvania, Occasioned by the Assembly’s Passing that Important Act, for Constituting the Judges of the Supreme Courts and Common-Pleas, During Good Behavior. Philadelphia. 1760. 39 pp.*Reproduced in Bailyn, ed., Pamphlets of the American Revolution.
    • 387 [anon.] A Memorial and Remonstrance Presented to the General Assembly of the State of Virginia . . . in Consequence of a Bill . . . for the Establishment of Religion by Law. Worcester, 1786. 16 pp.*
    • 388 [anon.] Northampton [Mass.] Returns to the Convention on the Constitution. 1780. In Oscar Handlin and Mary Handlin, eds. The Popular Sources of Political Authority (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1966), pp. 572-587.*Comprehensive critique of the Massachusetts Constitution of 1780, especially interesting on property requirement in voting for lower house.
    • 389 [anon.] No Standing Army in the British Colonies. New York, 1775. 18 pp.
    • 390 [anon.] Number I and Number II. City Gazette and Daily Advertiser, Charleston, March 16, 17, and 18, 1789.Parliamentary privilege and freedom of the press.
    • 391 [anon.] On the Management of Children in Infancy. South Carolina Gazette, November 1, 1773.*Brief statement on child-rearing up to literacy at age seven.
    • 392 [anon.] The People the Best Governors: Or a Plan of Government Founded on the Just Principles of Natural Freedom. New Hampshire, 1776. 11 pp.**†
    • 393 [anon.] The Political Establishment of the United States of America. Philadelphia, 1784. 25 pp.*Inadequacy of the Articles of Confederation—a new constitution is required.
    • 394 [anon.] The Power and Grandeur of Great Britain Founded on the Liberty of the Colonies. . . . New York, 1768. 24 pp.**The British government does not impose taxes; the people make voluntary contributions for revenue.
    • 395 [anon.] Proposals to Amend and Perfect the Policy of the Government of the United States of America. Baltimore, 1782. 36 pp.*
    • 396 [anon.] Review [in two parts] of John Adams’s “Defence of the Constitutions . . . of America,” taken from the Monthly Review (in London) and reprinted in the New York Packet, September 25 and 28, 1787.
    • 397 [anon.] Rudiments of Law and Government Deduced from the Law of Nature. Charleston, 1783. 56 pp.**†
    • 398 [anon.] Serious Considerations on Several Important Subjects, viz. On War . . . Observations on Slavery . . . Spiritous Liquors. Philadelphia, 1778. 48 pp.
    • 399 [anon.] To the Printers. Boston Gazette, July 15, 1765.Americans are equal to the British at home.
    • 400 [anon.] To the Printer. Boston Gazette, December 2, 1765.*Succinct statement of general principles in response to the Stamp Act.
    • 401 [anon.] [two untitled essays]. The United States Magazine, January, Providence, 1779 vol. I, pp. 5-41, 155-159.*The first summarizes traditional attitudes toward government. The second outlines reasons for distaste for established religion.
    • 402 A. Z. Virtuous Pennsylvanians. South Carolina Gazette, November 29, 1773.
    • 403 Benevolus. Poverty. City Gazette and Daily Advertiser, Charleston, December 8, 1789.*†
    • 404 Berkshire’s Grievances. Statement of Berkshire County Representatives, and Address to the Inhabitants of Berkshire. Pittsfield, Mass., 1778.**†
    • 405Bills of Rights and Amendments Proposed by Massachusetts and Virginia [to the Proposed United States Constitution]. 1788.*Reproduced in Kenyon, ed. The Antifederalists, pp. 421-39.
    • 406 Bostonians. Serious Questions Proposed to All Friends to The Rights of Mankind, With Suitable Answers. Boston Gazette, November 19, 1787.*†
    • 407 Britannus Americanus. Boston Gazette, March 17, 1766.**†
    • 408 Brutus [Thomas Treadwell? Robert Yates?] Against the New Federal Constitution. Worcester Magazine, December, 1787.List of objections to the proposed constitution.
    • 409 Brutus [Thomas Treadwell? Robert Yates?] No. I: To the Citizens of the State of New York. New York Journal and Weekly Register, October 18, 1787.*Not reproduced in the volume edited by Kenyon (as are several of the other essays by Brutus), this one expresses the fears that under the new Constitution the government will be too far from the people, and the country too heterogeneous.
    • 410 Brutus [Thomas Treadwell? Robert Yates?] No. II. New York Journal and Weekly Register, November 1, 1787.*
    • 411 Brutus [Thomas Treadwell? Robert Yates?] No. IV: To the People of the State of New York. New York Journal and Weekly Register, November 29, 1787.*Not reproduced in Kenyon, this essay explores the relationship between the people and their representatives.
    • 412 Brutus [Thomas Treadwell? Robert Yates?] No. V: To the People of the State of New York, New York Journal and Weekly Register, December 13, 1787.*Not reproduced in Kenyon, it proposes that the Constitution is an original compact among the people dissolving other compacts, rather than an agreement among the states.
    • 413 Brutus [Thomas Treadwell? Robert Yates?] No. VI: To the People of the State of New York, New York Journal and Weekly Register, December 27, 1787.*Reproduced in Kenyon, ed., The Antifederalists. Will the states be absorbed?
    • 414 Brutus Junior. Letter to the Editor. New York Journal, November 8, 1787.
    • 415 By a Gentleman Born and Bred. Remarks on the Bill of Rights, Constitution and Some Acts of the General Assembly of the State of Virginia. Richmond, 1801. 35 pp.
    • 416 Cato. Discourse Upon Libel. Massachusetts Spy, April 19, 1771.
    • 417 Centinel [Samuel Bryan?] No. I & No. II: To the People of Pennsylvania. Maryland Journal, October 30, and November 2, respectively, 1787.A widely-read Anti-federalist. Reproduced in Kenyon, ed., The Antifederalists.
    • 418 Cincinnatus. Number I, Number II, Number V, and Number VI: To James Wilson, esq. New York Journal, November 1, 8, 29, and December 6, respectively, 1787.An Anti-Federalist response to James Wilson’s defense of the proposed Constitution. Number II especially notable on freedom of the press and trial by jury. Number VI speaks to taxation and public finance.
    • 419 A Citizen. To the Citizens of Richmond, Not Freeholders. Virginia Argus, Richmond, July 31, 1801.In favor of broad suffrage.
    • 420 A Citizen of Connecticut. An Address to the Legislature and People of Connecticut on the Subject of Dividing the State into Districts for the Election of Representatives in Congress. New Haven, 1791. 37 pp.
    • 421 Columbus. A Letter to a Member of Congress, Respecting the Alien and Sedition Laws. Boston, 1799.
    • 422 Common Sense. [untitled essay]. Massachusetts Gazette, January, 1788.Arguments in support of the proposed Constitution.
    • 423 A Constant Customer. Extract of a Letter from a Gentleman in the Country to His Friend. Massachusetts Spy, February 18, 1773.*†
    • 424The Constitution of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery . . . to Which are Added the Acts . . . of Pennsylvania for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery. Philadelphia, 1788. 29 pp.
    • 425 Continental Congress. Appeal to the Inhabitants of Quebec, October 26, 1774, Journals of the Continental Congress, vol. I, pp. 105-113.**†
    • 426 Council of Censors of Pennsylvania. Minority Report. To the Freemen of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia, 1784, 12 pp.Anti-constitutionalists in Pennsylvania list the failures of the 1776 Pennsylvania Constitution.
    • 427 A Countryman. Letter to the Editor. New York Journal, Dec. 6, 1787.*The social disruptions caused by the war.
    • 428 A Countryman. Letter II. New York Journal, Dec. 13, 1787.Discusses section in the Constitution on the importation of slaves. Confused by the terms Federalist and anti-Federalist.
    • 429 D.D. Extract from a Thanksgiving Sermon, Delivered in the County of Middlesex. Worcester Magazine, January, 1787.*Defense of the Massachusetts government against the charges by Daniel Shays.
    • 430 Deliberator. To the Printers. Freeman’s Journal, Philadelphia, February 20, 1788.In opposition to the proposed Constitution.
    • 431 Demophilus [George Bryan?] The Genuine Principles of the Ancient Saxon, or English[,] Constitution, Philadelphia, 1776. 46 pp.**†
    • 432 De Witte, John [pseud.] To the Editor. American Herald, Worcester, December 3, 1787.An Anti-Federalist essay.
    • 433 An Elector. To the Free Electors of This Town. Boston Gazette, April 28, 1788.**†
    • 434 F.A. A Letter to a Right Noble Lord. Boston Gazette, July 22, 29, August 5, 12, 26, and September 2, 1765.Six-part essay in response to a member of Parliament who defended the Stamp Act.
    • 435 A Farmer. To the Editor. Maryland Gazette and Baltimore Advertiser, March 7, 1788.The new Constitution will not abate war or prevent despotism.
    • 436 Farmer. To the Printer. Pennsylvania Packet, Philadelphia, November 5, 1776.*Exposition of Whig ideology in relatively concise form.
    • 437 A Federalist. Letter to the Editor. Boston Gazette, December 3, 1787.A general defense of the proposed Constitution.
    • 438 A Federalist. To the People of Pennsylvania. Maryland Journal, November 6, 1787.In response to Centinel.
    • 439 Form of Ratification of the Federal Constitution by the State of New York. Boston Gazette, August 11, 1788.*
    • 440 Freeborn American. To the Printers. Boston Gazette and Country Journal, March 9, 1767.The duties of a free press.
    • 441 Freeholders of Boston. Instructions to Their Representatives. Boston Gazette, May 28, 1764.*Summary of Whig ideas and values.
    • 442 Freeholders of Newbury-Port. Instructions to Their Representatives. Boston Gazette, November 4, 1765.Summary of basic values.
    • 443 Freeholders of Plymouth. Instructions to Their Representatives. Boston Gazette, November 4, 1765.
    • 444 Freeman, [Untitled essay reproduced from the June 6 issue of the New York Gazette]. Georgia Gazette, September 19, 26, and October 3, 1765.**Virtual representation, the nature of representation, and the relationship of the American people to the British people.
    • 445 Freeman. Another Letter from Freeman. Georgia Gazette, October 26, 1769.*In response to Libertas, supports the position that the people are sovereign and can withdraw support from a legislature that breaks the contract.
    • 446 Hamden. On Patriotism. South Carolina Gazette, November 29, 1773.Brief discussion of private interest versus public good.
    • 447 Hermes. The Oracle of Liberty, and Mood of Establishing a Government. Philadelphia, 1791, 39 pp.
    • 448 Historicus. Royal South Carolina Gazette, Charleston, March 28, 1782.An untitled essay laying out the Tory view of republican government.
    • 449 Homespun. A Countryman. South Carolina Gazette, October 31, 1774.*Brief discussion of how deliberation on public affairs should proceed, who should be allowed to deliberate, etc.
    • 450 Hortensius. An Essay on the Liberty of the Press, Richmond, 1799. 30 pp.*
    • 451 An Impartial Citizen. A Dissertation Upon the Constitutional Freedom of the Press. Boston, 1801. 54 pp.**†
    • 452 Instructions of the Town of New-Braintree to its Representative. Worcester Magazine, June, 1786
    • 453 J. Letter to the Printer. The Boston Evening Post, May 23, 1763, Supplement.
    • 454 J.B.F. To the Electors of Anne-Arundel County. Maryland Journal and Baltimore Advertiser, February 23, 1787.In response to Samuel Chase’s piece in the same paper, J.B.F. attacks the practice of instructing representatives.
    • 455 The Journeyman Carpenters. An Address. American Daily Advertiser, Philadelphia, May 11, 1791.Justifies their strike and striking in general.
    • 456 Junius, Camillus. [untitled]. The Argus, or Greenleaf’s New Daily Advertiser, New York, March 15 and April 6, 1796.*Freedom of speech—the legislature has no “privilege” against criticism.
    • 457 A Landholder. For the New Federal Constitution. Worcester Magazine, December, 1787.
    • 458 Leonidas. A Reply to Lucius Junius Brutus’ Examination of the President’s Answer to the New Haven Remonstrance. New York, 1801. 62. pp.*Leonidas is attacking Brutus, a Federalist: topics range from the limits to majority rule to presidential power of appointment and removal.
    • 459 L.Q. To the Printers. Boston Gazette, May 16, 1763.A reply to T.Q., whose discussion on the separation of powers (prohibition on multiple office holding) appeared in the April 18 edition of the same paper.
    • 460 Majority and minority reports on the repeal of the Sedition Act. February 25, 1799. Annals of Congress, 5th Cong., 3rd Session, pp. 2987-2990, 3033-3014.*
    • 461 Medium. On the Proposed Federal Constitution. Worcester Magazine, December, 1787.
    • 462 A Member of the General Committee. To Freeman. South Carolina Gazette, October 18, 1769.Counters a critic of the Stamp Act.
    • 463A Memorial and Remonstrance Presented to the General Assembly of the State of Virginia . . . In Consequence of a Bill . . . for the Establishment of Religion by Law. Worcester, 1786. 16 pp.*
    • 464Memorial Presented to Congress . . . by Different Societies Promoting Abolition of Slavery. 1792. 31 pp.
    • 465 Monitor. No. VI, Massachusetts Spy, January 9, 1772.**A community has the right to reward every virtue and punish every vice. A list of virtues is included.
    • 466 Monitor. To the New Appointed Councellors of the Province of Massachusetts-Bay. Massachusetts Spy, August 18, 1774.**†
    • 467 Monitor. [untitled]. Massachusetts Gazette, October 30, 1787.Supports the proposed Constitution.
    • 468 M.Y. A Letter from a Son of Liberty in Boston to a Son of Liberty in Bristol County. Boston Evening Post, May 12, 1766.Defends lawyers as members of the legislature against those who would exclude lawyers from political office.
    • 469 A Native of this Colony. An Address to the Convention of the Colony . . . of Virginia, on the Subject of Government in General and Recommending a Particular Form to Their Attention. Virginia Gazette, June 8, 1776.**The basic principle underlying each form of government, with a good discussion of virtue (public versus private).
    • 470 Nestor. To the Publick. Worcester Magazine, December, 1786.**The blessings of civil society and the need for seeking the common good to remain a civil society (of the five essays, the first is best).
    • 471 Nov Anglicanus. To the Inhabitants of the Province. Boston Gazette, May 14, 1764.A response to the Stamp Act.
    • 472 An Observer. To the Editor. American Herald, Worcester, December 3, 1787.A rejoinder to Federalist paper number five.
    • 473 An Officer of the Late Continental Army. Against the Federal Constitution. Worcester Magazine, December, 1787.
    • 474 An Old Whig. To the Printer. Massachusetts Gazette, November 27, 1787.
    • 475 An Old Whig. To the Printer. Freeman’s Journal, Philadelphia, November 28, 1787.On constitutional conventions.
    • 476 An Old Whig. To the Printer. Maryland Gazette and Baltimore Advertiser, November 2, 1788.An opponent of the proposed Constitution predicts that the “necessary and proper” clause will be used to expand the powers granted Congress in Article I.
    • 477 One of the Subscribers. Letter to the Editor. New York Packet, September 21, 1789.*Propositions for reforming the system of public education in Boston, for both sexes.
    • 478 An Other Citizen. On Conventions. Worcester Magazine, September, 1786.*Opposed to the county conventions called by those opposed to the operation of Massachusetts courts. These conventions eventually led to Shays’s Rebellion.
    • 479 P. . . . To the Printers. New York Mercury, January 28, 1765.A typical response to the Stamp Act.
    • 480 Penn, William [pseud.] To the Printer. Independent Gazetteer, Philadelphia, January 3, 1788.An Anti-Federalist keying on the topic of presidential veto.
    • 481Personal Slavery Established by the Suffrages of Custom and Right Reason. Philadelphia, 1773. 26 ppA reply to a piece by Anthony Benezet, this essay outlines the standard arguments used in favor of slavery.
    • 482 Philadelphiensis [Benjamin Workman?] To the Printer. Freeman’s Journal, Philadelphia, February 6, 20, and April 9, 1788.An Anti-Federalist focusing on the executive branch.
    • 483 Philanthropos. [untitled]. Pennsylvania Gazette, Philadelphia., January 16, 1788.In support of the proposed Constitution.
    • 484 Philodemos. [untitled]. Boston American Herald, May 12, 1788.In support of the proposed Constitution.
    • 485 Philo Patriae [William Goddard?] The Constitutional Courant: Continuing Matters Interesting to Liberty, and No Wise Repugnant to Loyalty. Burlington, N.J. [?], 1765.
    • 486 Philo Publicus. Boston Gazette, October 1, 1764.*†
    • 487 Philo Publius [untitled]. New York Daily Advertiser, December 1, 1787.In support of the proposed Constitution.
    • 488 The Preceptor. Vol. II Social Duties of the Political Kind. Massachusetts Spy, May 21, 1772.**†
    • 489Proposed Amendments [to the Federal Constitution] Made by the Maryland Convention. Annapolis, 1788.
    • 490 A Republican. To the Printer. New Hampshire Gazette, Exeter, February 8 to March 22, 1783.*Summary of the Whig perspective.
    • 491 Republicus. To the Printer. The Kentucky Gazette, March 1, 1788.Against the proposed Constitution, especially the electoral college.
    • 492 Resolves of the Lower House of the South Carolina Legislature. South Carolina Gazette and Country Journal, December 17, 1765.*Resolutions in opposition to the Stamp Act; wording and logic very similar to that found in proposals by northern colonies.
    • 493 Resolves of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Boston Gazette, November 4, 1765.In opposition to the Stamp Act. Good summary of basic American political principles. See previous item.
    • 494 Rusticus. Letter to the Editor. New York Journal, September 13, 1787.In opposition to the proposed Constitution.
    • 495 Salus Populi. To the Freemen of the Province of Pennsylvania. South Carolina and American General Gazette, Charleston, April 3, 1776.Justifies breaking with England.
    • 496 [Several Quakers]. An Address to the Inhabitants of Pennsylvania by the Freemen of Philadelphia Who Are Now Confirmed. Philadelphia, 1777. 52 pp.
    • 497 Sidney. Letter to the Editor. New York Journal, September 13, 1787.In opposition to the proposed Constitution.
    • 498 Spartanus. Freemans Journal or New Hampshire Gazette, Portsmouth, June 15 and 29, 1776.*A strongly democratic statement.
    • 499 Theophrastus. A Short History of the Trial by Jury. Worcester Magazine, October, 1787.**†
    • 500To the Supporters and Defenders of American Freedom and Independence in the State of New York. New York, 1778.Urges no traffic with or toleration of Tories, loyalists, or collaborators with Britain.
    • 501 T.Q. On Separation of Powers: How Much Separation is Enough? Boston Gazette and Country Journal, April 4, 18, and June 6, 1763.*†See the piece by L.Q.
    • 502 The Tribune. No. xvii. South Carolina Gazette, October 6, 1766.**†
    • 503 Tribunus. Letters from Tribunus to Republicanus. Worcester Magazine, May, 1787.Two articles discussing public credit.
    • 504 Tullius. Three Letters on the Nature of the Federal Union, etc., Philadelphia, 1783. 28 pp.
    • 505 U. Boston Gazette, August 1, 1763.*†
    • 506 U. To the Printers. Boston Gazette, August 29, 1763.Diatribe against “private revenge.”
    • 507 Velerius. Massachusetts Centinel, Boston, November 28, 1787.Supports the proposed Constitution.
    • 508The Virginia Report of 1799-1800, Touching the Alien and Sedition Laws, Richmond, 1850.
    • 509 Virginiensis [Charles Lee?] Defense of the Alien and Sedition Laws. Philadelphia, 1798. 47 pp.
    • 510The Votes and Proceedings of the Freeholders and Other Inhabitants of the Town of Boston, In Town Meeting Assembled, According to Law. November 20, 1772, [Samuel Adams?].*Reproduced in Jensen, ed., Tracts of the American Revolution.
    • 511 Vox Populi. To the Printer. Massachusetts Gazette, Boston, October 30, 1787.Against the proposed Constitution, with a special concern for the dangers in congressional control of elections.
    • 512 The Worcester Speculator. No. VI. Worcester Magazine, October, 1787.**†
    • 513 Worcestriensis. To the Honorable . . . (No. II). Massachusetts Spy, August 14, 1776.*The importance of education to a republic.
    • 514 Worcestriensis. Number III. Massachusetts Spy, August 21, 1776.*The importance of religion.
    • 515 Worcestriensis. Number IV. Massachusetts Spy, September 4, 1776.**†

    A LIST OF NEWSPAPERS EXAMINED

    Anyone attempting to read comprehensively the newspapers published in America between 1760 and 1805 runs into several problems. First of all, a significant percentage of issues did not survive, and those that do are often available only on microfilm of poor quality and in various libraries. The Library of Congress has the most complete collection, but even there the problem is that few papers were published for as long as half the period under study. The strategy forced upon the researcher is to select judiciously from those papers available, with the aim of constructing a continuous set of newspapers over the period from each of the major cities and towns that generated the most activity. The problem is eased somewhat by the significant number of newspapers that did not usually publish political essays and letters, or if they did, tended to reprint essays from newspapers elsewhere. Most of the newspapers that were not read comprehensively, and are so indicated below, were in fact examined and determined to fall into this last category. An estimated four thousand political essays and letters were examined in the newspapers from the era. Because it was the practice in even the most sophisticated publications to reprint pieces from papers in other colonies, in some instances a political essay was encountered four or five times in various newspapers, from South Carolina to New Hampshire. In the list below, those newspapers that were consulted comprehensively for the period 1760-1805 are marked with an asterisk. The rest are listed to show which major papers were not so examined, and to help provide a reasonably complete list of newspapers for the period.

      CONNECTICUT

    • American Mercury (Hartford)*
    • Connecticut Courant (Hartford)*
    • Connecticut Gazette (New London)*
    • Connecticut Journal (New Haven)
    • Middlesex Gazette (Middletown)
    • New Haven Chronicle
    • New Haven Gazette*
    • Norwich Packet
    • Spectator*
    • Weekly Monitor (Litchfield)

      DELAWARE

    • Wilmington Courant
    • Wilmington Gazette

      GEORGIA

    • Augusta Chronicle
    • Georgia Gazette (Savannah)*
    • State Gazette of Georgia (Savannah)*

      MARYLAND

    • Maryland Chronicle (Frederick)
    • Maryland Gazette (Annapolis)*
    • Maryland Gazette and Baltimore Advertiser*
    • Maryland Journal (Baltimore)*
    • Weekly Museum (Baltimore)*

      MASSACHUSETTS

    • American Herald (Worcester)*
    • Berkshire Chronicle
    • Boston Censor*
    • Boston Chronicle*
    • Boston Evening Post*
    • Boston Gazette*
    • Boston Gazette and Weekly Republican Journal*
    • Cumberland Gazette (Portland, Maine)
    • Essex Journal (Salem)
    • Hampshire Chronicle (Springfield)
    • Hampshire Gazette (Northhampton)
    • Hampshire Herald (Springfield)
    • Independent Chronicle (Boston)
    • Massachusetts Centinel (Boston)*
    • Massachusetts Gazette (Boston)*
    • Massachusetts Spy (Worcester)*
    • Post Boy and Advertiser (Boston)*
    • Salem Mercury
    • Western Star (Stockbridge)
    • Worcester Magazine*

      NEW HAMPSHIRE

    • Freemans Oracle and New Hampshire Advertiser (Exeter)*
    • New Hampshire Gazette and General Advertiser (Exeter)
    • New Hampshire Mercury (Portsmouth)
    • New Hampshire Recorder and Weekly Advertiser (Keene)*
    • New Hampshire Spy (Portsmouth)

      NEW JERSEY

    • Brunswick Gazette (New Brunswick)
    • New Jersey Gazette (Trenton)
    • New Jersey Journal (Elizabethtown)
    • Plain Dealer (Bridgetown)*

      NEW YORK

    • Albany Gazette*
    • Albany Register
    • American Magazine (New York)
    • Goshen Repository
    • Hudson Gazette
    • Independent Journal (New York)
    • New York Daily Advertiser (New York)*
    • New York Gazette (New York)*
    • New York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (New York)*
    • New York Journal (New York)*
    • New York Mercury (New York)*
    • New York Museum (New York)
    • New York Packet (New York)*
    • Northern Centinel or Lansingburg Advertiser
    • Poughkeepsie Journal*

      NORTH CAROLINA

    • North Carolina Chronicle (Fayetteville)
    • North Carolina Gazette*
    • State Gazette of North Carolina (Newberne and Edentown)*

      PENNSYLVANIA

    • American Museum (Philadelphia)
    • Freeman’s Journal (Philadelphia)*
    • Independent Gazetteer (Philadelphia)*
    • Lancaster Journal*
    • Pennsylvania Evening Post and Daily Advertiser (Philadelphia)*
    • Pennsylvania Gazette (Philadelphia)*
    • Pennsylvania Herald (Philadelphia)
    • Pennsylvania Journal (Philadelphia)*
    • Pennsylvania Ledger (Philadelphia)*
    • Pennsylvania Mercury (Philadelphia)
    • Pennsylvania Packet (Philadelphia)*
    • Pittsburg Gazette

      RHODE ISLAND

    • Newport Herald
    • Newport Mercury*
    • Providence Gazette*
    • United States Chronicle (Providence)

      SOUTH CAROLINA

    • City Gazette, or Daily Advertiser (Charleston)*
    • The Columbian Herald or the Independent Courier (Charleston)
    • Royal South Carolina Gazette (Charleston)*
    • South Carolina and American General Gazette (Charleston)*
    • South Carolina Gazette (Charleston)*
    • South Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (Charleston)*
    • South Carolina State Gazette and Timothy’s Daily Advertiser (Charleston)*
    • South Carolina Weekly Chronicle
    • State Gazette of South Carolina (Charleston)*

      VIRGINIA

    • The Norfolk and Portsmouth Chronicle
    • Virginia Gazette (Winchester)*
    • Virginia Gazette and Petersburg Advertiser
    • The Virginia Gazette and Weekly Advertiser (Richmond)
    • The Virginia Herald and Independent Advertiser
    • Virginia Independent Chronicle (Richmond)*
    • The Virginia Journal and Alexandria Advertiser*

    COLLECTIONS OF WRITING FROM THE FOUNDING ERA

    There are a number of good, more-specialized collections that have proved to be very useful, and any student of American political theory would want to be at least familiar with their respective contents. In some instances we have drawn upon them for pieces found in this collection.

    • Almon, John, ed. A Collection of Papers Relative to the Dispute Between Great Britain and America, 1764-1775. New York: Da Capo Press, 1971.
    • Bailyn, Bernard, ed. Pamphlets of the American Revolution. Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press, 1965.
    • Borden, Morton, ed. The Antifederalist Papers. East Lansing, Mich.: Michigan State University Press, 1965.
    • Cooke, J. E., ed. The Federalist. Cleveland: Meridian Books, 1961.
    • Elliott, Jonathan, ed. The Debates in the Several State Conventions on the Adoption of the Federal Constitution. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1901.
    • Farrand, Max, ed. The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1937.
    • Ford, Paul Leicester, ed. Pamphlets on the Constitution of the United States. Brooklyn: 1888.
    • Handlin, Oscar, and Mary Handlin, eds. The Popular Sources of Political Authority. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1966.
    • Hyneman, Charles S. and George W. Carey, eds. A Second Federalist. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1967.
    • Jensen, Merrill, ed. Tracts of the American Revolution, 1763-1776. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1978.
    • Kenyon, Cecilia, ed. The Antifederalists. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1966.
    • Levy, Leonard W., ed. Freedom of the Press from Zenger to Jefferson: Early American Libertarian Theories. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1966.
    • Lewis, John D., ed. Anti-Federalists Versus Federalists: Selected Documents. San Francisco: Chandler, 1967.
    • Mark, Irving and Eugene L. Schwaab, eds. The Faith of Our Fathers: An Anthology Expressing the Aspirations of the American Common Man, 1790-1860. New York: Octagon Books, 1976.
    • Padover, Saul K., ed. The World of the Founding Fathers. New York: A. S. Barnes and Company, 1977.
    • Pole, J. R., ed. The Revolution in America, 1754-1788: Documents and Commentaries. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1970.
    • Rudolph, Frederick, ed. Essays on Education in the Early Republic. Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press, 1965.
    • Smith, Wilson, ed. Theories of Education in Early America, 1655-1819. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1973.
    • Storing, Herbert, ed. The Complete Antifederalist. 7 vols. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1981.
    • Thornton, John Wingate, ed. The Pulpit of the American Revolution. Boston: Gould and Lincoln, 1860.

Last modified April 13, 2016